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Tyre situation splits the Formula 1 paddock
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Posted By: James Allen  |  15 Apr 2013   |  3:32 pm GMT  |  373 comments

Tyres were once again the talk of the Formula 1 paddock in China as teams chose to sit out much of qualifying to save rubber while in the race, those who started on the soft tyre were forced to pit as early as lap six because their rubber fell off the cliff. Jenson Button had to ask whether to fight another driver mid race as lap time consistency was more of a priority.

The performance difference between the two compounds also prompted a mix of strategies, with the front seven cars starting the race on the soft tyres, while the likes of Jenson Button and Sebastian Vettel didn’t set a competitive lap in qualifying so they could start on the more durable medium.

That meant it wasn’t until those who started on the medium tyre stopped for the final time to put on a set of the softs – and in doing so set up a thrilling grandstand finish with Vettel hunting down Lewis Hamilton for the final podium place – that we saw the true pecking order.

While the mix of strategies provided an exciting end to the race, in the early stages the likes of Button and Vettel were forced to manage their tyres to make their strategy work, and in doing so couldn’t push to make up ground and at times they had to let people through to avoid losing tyre life defending their position.

The paddock is split as to whether the new brand of Pirelli tyres are actually good for the show.

Positive about new tyres

Former team boss and BBC pundit Eddie Jordan is supportive of the new range of Pirelli tyres. “What Pirelli have served up is unpredictability and unpredictability gives excitement – and that’s what we got in China,” he said.  “I didn’t know for sure whether Vettel could pass Hamilton or not. The intrigue went right through the race and that’s what we want.”

Meanwhile former Jordan technical director Gary Anderson agreed, adding that if Pirelli had chosen the hard, rather than the soft, alongside the medium in China, we would have seen a one-stop race: “In terms of the tyres themselves, I think they make teams think harder,” he told the BBC. “Some make it work and some don’t. There’s nothing wrong with that.

“You have to drive the car within its limits and the tyres are part of the car. If Pirelli had gone to China with the medium tyre and the hard rather than the medium and soft, the most critical tyre would have done 25 laps. So it would have been a one-stop race. Is that what people want?”

Former Red Bull driver and BBC commentator David Coulthard who won 13 races said: “I’m reluctant to end up being the guy who says: ‘Shut up and get on with it.’ But it’s difficult for me to understand why tyres are supposed to be a more fundamental part of the overall success of a team than they were before.”

In Pirelli’s defence, the Italian company’s motorsport director Paul Hembery said: “It was degradation, rather than actual wear, that dictated the strategy but we still saw consistent lap times from the medium compound, even on a long run of 15 laps or more.

“Once more we saw a very wide variety of race strategies, with Button and Vettel opting to run on the soft tyres at the end. This gave us a thrilling finish, with a battle for the final podium place between Hamilton and Vettel that went all the way to the chequered flag.”

There was also an interesting comment from JA on F1 reader Tim B, someone who has followed Motorsport a long time , which we thought was worth re-publishing. He said: “I’ve been following motorsport in general and F1 in particular for 40 years, and I compete in amateur motorsport in a purpose-built race car. I know a little bit about motor racing and what it takes to drive a car fast on a track.

“I happen to like the variables that have been introduced by the tyres. I also don’t mind DRS as a way of compensating for the effect on a following car of the turbulent aerodynamic wake of the leading car. However, I am getting tired of being characterised as a shallow or uninformed fan, or a “magpie”, or any one of a number of sneers, for holding those views.”

Critical of new tyres

McLaren team principal Martin Whitmarsh, who saw his driver Button forced to let drivers through rather than defend his position in China so that he could make their strategy work, said: “It’s quite excruciating, trying to save tyres non-stop from start to finish. It seems to go on forever. It feels painful, and however bad it is for me, it must be a lot worse if you have to drive like that.”

Button, who led the race momentarily before going on to finish fifth, added: “It was quite a strange race: there was no point fighting because that was the quickest way to the end. One lock-up, one trip over the marbles and the tyres would have been gone so our strategy wouldn’t have worked and it was a very tight strategy.

“It was so difficult, I would radio in and say ‘Can I fight them?’ They’d come back and say ‘Yes, fight, fight!’ And then ten seconds later ‘No, you need to look after the tyres and get to our target lap.’ You don’t want to look like you’re not fighting but for us the best thing to do was to have clean air and not destroy the tyres. It’s not the most exciting way to go racing but we got 10 points because we did that.”

While Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso stormed to his first victory of the season, his Brazilian team-mate Felipe Massa struggled with graining and finished sixth: “I had amazing graining on the front tyres and after that I was just getting slower and slower because the graining was increasing at the front,” he said. “In the second stint I started to have a lot of graining and I was a bit scared it was too much.”

After qualifying and ahead of the race in China, Red Bull’s Mark Webber, who started from the pit lane and failed to finish the race, said: “It will all look good in the first five or six laps, having everyone fighting, but it’s a little bit WWF [referring to the wrestling sports-entertainment brand] at the moment. Whatever fuel load you have got in the car, if you race people, you are in trouble. So just don’t race, put the tyre on and just try and get home.”

Speaking about the soft tyres ahead of the race, Mercedes’ Nico Rosberg said: “With those tyres it is more of a question of how many corners you are going to get to, rather than laps!”

Meanwhile Mercedes non-executive chairman Niki Lauda told the APA news agency: “You have to wonder if it’s necessary for the tyres to be so on the limit, when everyone has to go in the box just after starting a race. It’s so complicated, especially for the spectators.”

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1

Imagine this “conservation” of tyres in Moto GP! You might as well give them 50cc scooters if they want to do that.

Come to think of it, I’ve got Pirelli tyres on my Aprilia Tuono and the new rear is squaring off after just 400 miles! Never again.

2

Longtime reader, James. First time poster. And grumpy old F1 fan. China was an embarrassment to the spirit of F1 racing, to me, matching the Michelin debacle of Indy 2005, except that in 2005 that was a design error. This time around it’s a design decision.

@Dizzy: +10

The FIA needs to limit itself to a single artificial technique to employ: DRS or marble-spewing thermally challenged tires. Pick one.

@Tiga: +10

If the SCAA can do it, so can the supposed pinnacle of motorsport. It’s embarrassing. A former innovative, bleeding-edge formula reduced to a series of computational vector nannies.

The reality is that the fastest qualifying laps, the fastest race laps are in the past, now pushing 10 years in the past. Those records will never be broken in the new faux-racing F1.

Sure, for safety reasons, it’s for the best, but if the FIA/FOM are determined to slow the cars down and spice up the racing, then lose a big chunk of the aero (Frank, you’ll still have your 200mph advert) and revert to manual transmissions.

With more predictable-wearing tires on cars that can follow each other closely we can enjoy the spectacle of the world’s most skilled drivers performing real overtakes, early and often. While double-clutching.

Why not? The FIA ended the ground effect wars in ’91 and it wasn’t until 2001 that the aerodynamicists clawed it back. F1 is overdue for a big aero reset. And DRS ain’t it. And cheap rubber doesn’t make the experience feel better.

Will it happen? No. There’s no room in today’s F1 car for a third pedal and a shift lever. Bernie’s recent gigantic tracks of tarmac are designed for 3000+ kg of downforce cars. Heavily invested in CFD/wind tunnels the big spending teams would rebel. The smaller independent teams would embrace it, but Bernie could care less about them.

We get what we get, fake passes and tire management chess, but I promise to try and pretend this season is the greatest open-wheel racing ever. For those of you who actually enjoy this WWE on Wheels, please tell me what it is you enjoy about the sitting-duck DRS passes? Is a fake pass really better than no pass at all?

We do get to look forward to smaller, lower revving engines next year, with lower reliability, so that’s something.

Sorry for the long rant, but the rules state the first post must be over 2000 characters. I’m just following team orders.

3

I understand that DRS and tire compounds are meant to “mix it up” and make for more entertaining racing for the fans. F1 is a business and the name of the game is entertainment that generates revenue. It’s kind of sad to think about in those terms, but that’s the reality. To that end, I think that they’ve missed the mark this time. It’s not exciting to watch drivers drone around the track unwilling or unable to engage each other in competitive driving. When you’ve taken the driver out of the equation, which is what I think these new tires have nearly done, you’ve interfered too much. I believe strategy should be a strong element, but when it becomes the only element it takes away from the excitement.

4
ROBERTO MARQUEZ

Are we talking about World Drivers Championship or World Tyre Championship ? Would not it be better to have good tyres and let drivers drive, and make pit stops compulsory , in some races one, in others 2,etc. If Lewis had the pole is it not fair to bet that taking the tyres out of the equation he probably would have won ? What happens if there is a fatal accident because one of these “tyres” blows ?

5

I feel maybe the issues with tyres won’t be simply solved by makin more resilient compounds. Even if the tyres were more resilient, and drivers would be looking at 3 stops max. You’d still find a few drivers driving at a slower pace to try to eek out extra mileage and run a two stop race. I fully agree that the soft was the wrong choice for china but I feel that the gap between compound performance could be altered. At the moment the gap is only 1-1.2 seconds. With average pit loss times being in the region 20-21 seconds then if you had a resilient soft then you’d still need a 20 lap stint to justify an extra stop. Strategy has little bearing with resilient close reforming compounds. Now a 2-2.5 performance step would create options for strategy because although the tyres would “go off” after 10-12 laps, the increase in pace you’d achieve would be justified by the pit stop. As it is, drivers will always look after tyres because of how much relative time they lose in the pits versus the performance gain in the tyre they run for the stint.

I for one enjoy the Pirelli era of F1. But I’m fully aware of the problems of it. But I feel large performance steps could be a way to offer a solution. Who cares If tyres wear quickly, as long as there is a gain to be had?

6

The way I see it, all the teams and drivers are playing on a level playing field. Each of them has the ability to design and setup their car to maximize the opportunity to get to the chequered flag in the fastest time. Some are better at it than others, so they win. It doesn’t matter if there are artificial aids like DRS and tyres deliberately designed to degrade as they all have same same thing to contend with. What these factors are doing however is spicing up the strategy and intrigue of each race. I was enthralled with the China race as there were different teams trying different strategies, and on the last lap we were still not sure what the podium was going to look like. Beats a boring procession with minimal overtaking and one predictably superior team/driver lapping most of the field ( although we will probably see some of this later in the season when the engineers start to figure out the optimum setups like last year). To me, the strategy game is what sets F1 apart from a lot of other racing categories.

7

Wouldn’t it be better to use normal tires and just get rid of the wings? Then they could drive full-out and pass for real without DRS.

8
Paul du Maître

Just for the record, i love Pirelli tyres F1 and my car does have Pirelli tyres (although they predate Pirelli’s entrance in F1). As a customer, i can make the difference between road tyres and F1 tyres.

The only thing i’d ask Pirelli is to have less rubber marbles on track…

9

I’ve done amateur SCCA formula car racing, and I’m a great fan of Formula One since a child. SCCA races are about 30 – 40 minutes of hard driving, F1 is about three of those put together, and the pinnacle of driving and technical challenge.

It’s a reasonable target for F1 – three segments between two stops, one stop if you’re Button or lucky, three stops if you’re screwing up. People can relate to that, and its about what we had last year, with DRS to keep the strategies working instead of bottling up behind slower cars. But in between stops there’s got to be racing – its got to be close to flat! Even SCCA can manage that. If F1 can’t, the word pinnacle does not apply. If the guys had run close to flat instead of a schedule in China they could have literally run out of tires. Obviously we can do better, and the public expects it of F1.

10

The way I see it is that the current tyre situation is ludicrous, but then again I hate having a control tyre in any series, I much preferred the days of multiple manufacturers bringing different compounds to different tracks and having dominance at some and not others, so I say drop the single supplier, open up team sponsorship tyre choices, have mandatory pit stops for tyre changes, force a starting minimum amount of fuel to stop the fuel/tyre saving modes.

DRS unfortunately is needed while the cars significantly alter the down force of the following car, so unless the FIA can change the regs to have a natural slipstream I think DRS in needed.

Now to my pet hate. Seeing a f****ing wheel coming off the hub following a pit stop, not only is it unnecessary it is dangerous and every time we see one come off there is always the possibility of a calamity and a team fine is a slap on the wrist and not a solution. Time that the single wheel nut is retired, not just from f1 but from all forms of motor racing. For the sake of safety for drivers, marshals and spectators it is time to regulate a wheel stud pattern of 4 or 5 studs and never again see a wheel go rolling across the track because of the failure of a single wheel nut to torque up.

11

Having just watched this link from an earlier posting http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1WuWu8kGak

it just confirms I am sick of hearing about tyres and makes last weekend look pathetic as a race. By next year we will also have to contend with an F1 car with an engine no bigger than a mini cooper. Then we shall see how sad it really has become. At least for the moment Sky have eclipsed the BBC whose coverage is now truly awful. Jake H, DC & EJ was so good at it and the red button was a joy after the race but now all gone.

12

I’ve watched Formula 1 since I was 5 years old and I’ve never missed a race. I really think we’re getting some of the best quality racing ever, even if the drivers can’t drive 10/10ths every lap. Before the cars were super reliable drivers had to nurse engines, and gearboxes and things like that. This is no different except the teams can’t control it and they just don’t like the variable. But, they have millions of dollars and some of the best brains on the planet. They should be able to cope with a few variables being thrown their way.

However, I think the tyres could be fine tuned a bit. You’d never be able to get it perfect for every track, but I think the aim should be this for the the best type of racing:

Using a race that is 60 laps long as an example:

Have a soft tyre that lasts 10-12 laps. It’s first lap is it’s best for qualifying, but if you’re really on the limit you can get that 2nd lap to work for you if you’re lucky. Having the tyres last for 10 laps means you’re not punished for using them in qualifying so there’s more cars on track on the Saturday. It also means that if you put them on at the end of the race, you have enough time to pass quite a few cars. This always makes for a final end to the race. Even if it’s a guy coming from 13th to 5th in the final laps, I love seeing just how far up he can get.

The hard tyre should last 15 laps. They should be faster over a stint of anything over 10 laps. This would lead to hard decisions over whether to make more stops for softs, or go longer on the hards. The default strategy for most teams would probably be soft + hard + hard + hard. But, that still leaves 5 laps to find somewhere.

I think that would make for a great race.

Also, I think we’re living in an era now where Formula 1, and people in general need to be conserving our resources. This means that a car that can have less fuel, and use less of it’s tyres, should be a car that does well. But, also just having an out and out quick car means you do well. Having all that means we don’t turn up week in, week out knowing which car is going to win, and I love it.

13

Having the tyres degrade rapidly made for an interesting rade in Canada 2010 (bridgestones at the time) and pirelli were asked to make tyres that would degrade as quickly as that.

However it’s all just made things artificial and too much importance is on the tyres. We have DRS and mandatory KERS (the effect of which will be greater in 2014) so there are enough variables to allow the amount of overtaking they desire without the tyres falling apart so quick.

In terms of marketing it is bad as people just associate pirelli tyres with degradation

14

Get rid of the soft tires altogether. Give the teams a medium for slow speed circuits, and the hard compounds. With hard compounds, you’d have the cars sliding around, fighting for traction. One pit stop per race is enough – it makes that one stop critical, and keeps a factor of strategy and timing in place. Cruising around, using only part of the car’s potential, is not racing.

15

Sorry James I haven’t read all the posts but I feel the problem is summerised by this. In Pirelli’s defence, the Italian company’s motorsport director Paul Hembery said: “It was degradation, rather than actual wear, that dictated the strategy”

Pirelli were asked to provide tire that wear out to give 2-3 stops by the fia because that’s what the fans said they wanted but they have created tires that suffer degradation or thermal degredation. A term never heard of in f1 prior to 2011. This is the problem and what the drivers and fans don’t like.

Yes we want multi stops and that the drivers can drive to the maximum till they run out of rubber.. I think its too simple to say that Pirelli have provided what they were asked for so its not there fault. Maybe the first gen tire of 2011 were the best…

16

http://www.auto-motor-und-sport.de/formel-1/neue-pirelli-reifen-wird-in-spanien-alles-anders-6920544.html

Lauda is quoted here that starting from Barcelona, Pirelli will bring new more durabele tyres with a better operating window. Pirelli says nothing has been decided yet.

If it is all true F1 should shame itself.

17

One of my biggest dislikes of DRS is when the car in front is left totally defenseless & the car behind simply opens DRS & then goes straght past with relative ease.

Some of the most exciting/intense racing I’ve seen have been when you have had one driver defending with a car behind doing everything to try & find a way past, I loved those 2 great Alonso/Schumacher battles at Imola in 05/06, I was kept on the edge of my seat through to the end of those 2 races watching 2 great drivers racing each other hard. OK no overtake occurred but it was thrilling to watch.

When there is zero chance to overtake & the cars behind are not able to even attempt an overtake then yes it can get a bit dull.

The problem however is that DRS often swings things too far the other way, Instead of overtaking been too hard, It often then becomes far too easy & I think thats equally as bad.

One of the thing which got me hooked on racing is the racing, I love watching close racing, I love watching good/close racing battles & I love watching good, exciting overtaking & to me DRS produces none of these & over the past 2 seasons its been doing nothing but hurt my enjoyment of the races to the point where my attention has started to go elsewhere.

I remember in the Pre-DRS era, Watching one car starting to catch another was exciting, Watching that car looking for ways to overtake was exciting & watching any eventual overtaking move was exciting. Now I all too often find myself getting excited over one car catching another only for that car to hit DRS & breeze straght past when he gets there, No excitement, No tension over a good battle, Nothing & that really kills my enjoyment of the race.

Im not saying that I necessarily prefer what we had before as overtaking was harder than it could have been, I accept that. However I don’t believe DRS is the answer because I feel its taken things way too far the other way, Overtaking is now too easy & there’s now so much of it that I feel its starting to be devalued. I also believe that the drivers that are great overtakers are also now not standing out as much as they used to because everyone can pass & there’s now less need for that exciting dive up the inside which made guys like Hamilton, Kobayashi & Juan Montoya stand out like they did & become fan favorites as a result.

In the DRS-era we are seeing more passing, A lot more, However we are now seeing a lot less exciting overtaking & thats the thing I hate the most!

18

F1 folk are champion complainers.

They also have short memories. Remember the season when tyre changes were banned? It was the dullest ever.

So – go Pirelli.

19

HEAR HEAR!!!!! Keep the tyres as they are! From what i can see,the people saying the tyres are no good,and are calling for change,have a vested interest(the teams struggling with Degradation),or they are an old time fan that wish it was still the 1950’s,and Fangio,Moss,Clark,etc. were still running around! LOL!!!!!

But SERIOUSLY,can anyone HONESTLY say this ISN”T the best start to a season ever,I Don’t Think So!!

20

Don’t like Pirelli tires or DRS or KERS (although it’s interesting how no one complains about this “gimmick” anymore)? You can always stitch off.

F1 traditionalists/dinosaurs have a wealth of motorsports to chose to watch (in both N America and Europe), so just switch off if it offends your common sensibilities so much.

The issue for these ‘fans’ seems to be that the new direction that F1 is forging is now so exciting, so engaging, so captivating, that no one can tear their eyes away.

Where I live, F1 is a middle of the night or early morning event. Things used to be that for 80% of the tracks you woke up for the start, stayed awake for til the first stop, then were able to catch a few winks before waking up for the podium ceremony.

This past race had me on the edge of my seat at 5am! Without Pirelli, Vettel would have cruised around in 3rd place til the end of the race. No drama, no excitement, no racing (‘artificial’ or otherwise).

(As someone who doesn’t watch golf because I don’t want to be bored) chalk me up as a massive supporter!

21

I think the tyres are fantastic,but the situation in Qualifying has to change,or by the middle of the year it will be a 5 minute Q3,not 10!!
A fairly simple solution would be to change the Q3 runners to be starting the race on the tyres they set their best Q2 time,and give them 1 extra set of Options(to be returned to Pirelli immediately after qualifying),provided they do a run on a set of their own as well. That would get the Top 10 fighting down to the last second of Q3,and provide the same spectacle that Qualifying used to provide when they were racing on Bridgestones,without the “sterile” Racing they produced by not degrading at all,and even getting faster when they went all the way down to lose the grooves,although not for many laps. Anyone remember how good Alonso was at driving the Renault with the tyres in that condition? He comprehensibly Smashed Michael Schumacher on more than one occasion,in this situation.
Another thing that would help overtaking in other area’s than the DRS Zones,would be to use sweepers & Jet Blowers like Nascar does during safety car period’s to clean up some of the discarded rubber build-up,but only at the critical area’s for overtaking. They shouldn’t change the tyres(although this weekends move to Med/Hard is very sensible compared to the Soft/Hard mix originally planned for Bahrain)as they are creating excellent strategy racing,and the best thing is the how if the teams go just one or two laps too long and hit the cliff,it can change the result completely.The teams are also preferring different tyres to each other,i.e. Lotus,Force India,& to a lesser extent,Ferrari,seem to like the Option’s, whereas Mercedes,Red Bull,Mclaren & Torro Rosso
prefer the Primes for the race,which opens all sorts of options regarding pitstop strategy,like going hard and doing extra pitstops,or doing less and staying out as long as possible,then firing up on the options in the back end of the race,with low fuel,and the ability to change easily if circumstances dictate!
[mod]

22

For me F1 is about doing the best job with race day the culmination and obivously the most entertaining part of that job. If the job was simple then it wouldn’t be a challenge. Normally changes to the technical rules are used to maintain the challenge and recently aero has been the biggest problem for F1 because mainly one team with the best aerodynamisist has dominated. Pirelli has reduced the aero advantage to one of an equal component and evened up the field. They should be praised for their work and those who are complaining should put their energies into the car because they are not going to get a unanimous decision from the teams. After all no one is going to hand the advantage back to Red Bull who would arguably be the boggest beneficiaries in that scenario. I doubt there are many Ferrari fans calling for a change in the tyre’s. 🙂

23

TIRES – The tires make no sense to me. Both from an environmental and a racing point of view: the drivers are forced to stay on the racing line as the marbles on the side track would destroy their race strategy.

DRS – I am okay with DRS. A faster car should be upfront and not stuck behind a slower car. Perhaps the DRS system should be re-engineered to have the sixties style slipstream racing back?

ERS – I am very much looking forward to the energy recovery system. This should be the real differentiator. It is both beneficial to the environment and the racing.

Also, encourage teams to have their cars as light as possible. This would stimulate material research and innovation.

And make tires and fuel last the race distance. It would be a huge cost reduction in pit crew and tires obviously.

24

“I ran three teams during the tyre-war era of the late 1990s and early 2000s, which some are saying was a time when drivers could push right to the limit all the time. But that’s a fallacy. They could never go 100% all the time…F1 has never been any different in the 40 years I have known it. The only difference is the tyre-management aspect is more visible now and the complaints have developed a bit of momentum.”

— Gary Anderson

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/formula1/22147074

so…i think the critics should pretty much suck it up.

25

Agreed, I just hope they suck it up silently because Pirelli are doing an excellent job. There are some teams out there doing an excellent job of making the tyres work and that alone refutes the criticisms in my view. When I listed to teams complain about the tyres all I hear is “we haven’t done a good enough job”.

26

Doing some unofficial counting.

It seems about 85% of the comments are negative about the Pirelli tyres & about 80% are negative about the DRS.

Matches the feeling to both I’ve seen on other fan websites.

Perhaps time for a rethink on both?

27

judging by this blog that counting is not unofficial but un-accurate

28

Inaccurate in what way?

Maybe you should read all the comments & take a count of each for/against, Thats what I did.

Also based off several poll’s on other websites which have ended with similar results.

29

Even if that’s true, what of it?

It’s normal that the people who aren’t happy will be quite vocal about it, while those that are tend to just sit back and enjoy.

If Pirelli did a sudden turn around and produced super durable tyres for 2014 then chances are that suddenly 80-85% of opinions would be negative about that instead.

30

i would encourage anyone who dislike the current situation in f1 with the tires & drs to abandon it & instead watch the indycar series.

since they introduced there new car & v6 turbo engine package last season the racing has been simply fantastic.

theres no stupid gimmicks like the drs, the tyres dont fall apart like the pirellis do & theres tons of brilliant racing & real overtaking all of which is truly exciting to watch for the fans.

i have been a fan of f1 since i was taken to the watkins glen gp by my uncle in 1971 & attended most of the us/canadian gp’s in that time. however since 2011 my love of f1 has declined thanks to the drs & pirelli tires & i am so dis-interested in the way things are now that i will no longer be watching f1 sadly.

31

Hate both Pirelli & DRS & been honest if there retained for much longer I may simply stop following F1 after been a massive fan for about 40yrs.

The fans of the DRS & Pirelli say the racing is exciting & there’s loads of passing.

Well I personally find nothing exciting or interesting about DRS passing. Watching 1 driver hit a button & cruise straght the car infront half way down a straght is boring, There’s nothing exciting about that.

Regarding the tyres, watching drivers cruising around to a lap delta nursing the tyres is also boring & watching 1 driver pass another because his tyres are a second a lap faster is equally boring.

I used to love watching those great on-track fights because the best drivers in the world & used to love watching exciting overtaking & sadly in the modern era of F1 we simply don’t see much of either.

Today its all about quantity rather than quality, A lot more overtaking of a much lower quality, Such a low quality that there boring & completely unexciting to watch.

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