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Ferrari ridicule new F1 teams
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Ferrari ridicule new F1 teams
Posted By:   |  20 May 2009   |  1:22 pm GMT  |  89 comments

On the official Ferrari website there is an extraordinary piece, posted today, which has a major dig at the calibre of teams lining up to join Formula 1 next season under the new budget cap rules. The tone is very disparaging.

www.ferrari.com

www.ferrari.com

Under the headline “Formula 1 or GP3?” the following piece appears,

“Maranello, 20th May – They couldn’t almost believe their eyes, the men at women (sic) working at Ferrari, when they read the papers this morning and found the names of the teams, declaring that they have the intention to race in Formula 1 in the next year.

Looking at the list, which leaked yesterday from Paris, you can’t find a very famous name, one of those one has to spend 400 Euros per person for a place on the grandstand at a GP (plus the expenses for the journey and the stay..). Wirth Research, Lola, USF1, Epsilon Euskadi, RML, Formtech, Campos, iSport: these are the names of the teams, which should compete in the two-tier Formula 1 wanted by Mosley. Can a World Championship with teams like them – with due respect – can have the same value as today’s Formula 1, where Ferrari, the big car manufacturers and teams, who created the history of this sport, compete? Wouldn’t it be more appropriate to call it Formula GP3?”

This was posted before the Paris court rejected Ferrari’s application for an injunction against the 2010 rules, but it has certainly upped the ante. Ferrari is deliberately provoking the debate, remember on their site last week was a long piece about how “Ferrari made F1 great.”

The FIA’s statement today is as much a response to this latest posting on the Ferrari site as it is to the verdict of the Paris court,

“No competitor should place their interests above those of the sport in which they compete. The FIA, the teams and our commercial partners will now continue to work to ensure the wellbeing of Formula One in 2010 and beyond.”

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1

Is this why Juan Pablo Montoya left F1 to become a Nascar Driver! TO MUCH DRAMA

2

You know what I might be in a minority on this one – but is the withdrawal of the “Manufacturers” really the potential apocalypse everyone is predicting. What have they really brought to the party except the astronomical increase in budgets over recent years that are putting the independents who built and founded the sport in jeopardy.
Apart from Ferrari & Toyota none of them are “F1 manufacturers” they have all bought into technology and skills – Renault bought Benetton (Formally Tolman – independent) Mercedes bought into Mclaren (independent) , BMW bought Sauber (independent), Honda bought BAR formerly Tyrrell (independent) – now Brawn (independent again) who incidentally are doing ok .

Red Bull rescued the formerly “Manufacturer” Ford/Jaguar who initially bought Stewart GP (Independant), Torro Rosso (formerly Minardi – independent), Force India formerly Jordan (independent) … I could go on – F1 was built by independents who’s sole purpose of existence was to go Motor Racing and we lapped it up.

Do these young drivers & Ferrari who proclaim the withdrawal of the Manufacturers will decimate F1 – Alonso/Raikkenon e.t.c. – really believe they provide better entertainment than Rosberg/Lauda/Hunt or Senna/Prost @ Mclaren Mansell/Piquet @ Williams, Mansell (Lotus) v Senna (Mclaren) Berger/Alesi & Schumacher (Benneton) the list goes on. F1 car in those days was edge of the seat stuff where the cars actually overtook on the track by the skill of the driver where cars could follow each other through corners close enough to get in the slip stream on the straight and – If the drivers’ nuts were big enough- which they invariably were – overtake on the brakes – nobody can forget Mansell/Senna down the straight of Barcelona (91) wheel to wheel at 190 mph or Senna / Mansell at Jerez (86) or Monaco (92) or Piquet Mansell at Silverstone (’87). All of this golden era of F1 was based around INDEPENDeNTS with the odd Manufacturer that came and went when it was commercially viable for them to do so. And it was all achieved on a budget well below £40million or the equivelant of what it would have been then.

At the moment it would seem unthinkable of an F1 without Ferrari as in the 80’s it would have seemed unthinkable of an F1 without JPS Lotus – but Lotus went and F1 survived and I have no doubt F1 would survive without Ferrari -strange as it may seem now – but even if they did go ….they’d be back.

3

Note they didn’t mention Prodrive.

And, uh… Lola? C’mon Ferrari, you remember them don’t you? They’re the guys who designed the GT-40 back in the 60s that kicked your asses up and down Lemans. They’ve also been building F1 cars on and off since 1962 fer krisake.

Makes it hard to support the side that’s right when they’re being such monumental douches.

4

The ‘spoilt brat’ sentiment of the many responses comes through loud and clear – and quite justifiably.

£100 million (or is it €100 million?) Doesn’t seem like peanuts even I suspect to big car manufacturers in the current environment. It just seems to be the downsizing issue that they have problems with.

Surely the acid test will be how many people follow Ferrari out of the door (would we really miss Renault and Toyota?)

If more than five of the current major competitors were to leave then the whole spectacle would be in danger of degradation but otherwise we have been here before and provided Bernie manages it correctly we will come out the other side. Whatever happens if ticket prices remain as they are then this is going to become a TV only sport even for enthusiasts

5

The comments on this post are unbelievable; so much emotion, mainly hatred (for Ferrari).

This is exactly what Mosley wanted: hatred deflecting from the main issue which is half the teams (Red Bull x2, Toyota, Renault and Ferrari) disagree with him and threaten to leave F1 because of unfair 2-tier rules.

For well-known brands to be viewed on the same level as new teams is an insult to the established teams.

The FIA is the problem here, not Ferrari. Someone must stand up against this.

6

Ferrari are right, F1 is the best and Mosley is a joke!

7

Based on attitudes like this, I think F1 would be better WITHOUT Ferrari in the long term. The series would take a serious PR hit at first, but in the long term the potential for more equitable racing is better without them. Pure arrogance.

8

What goes around comes around…

The GPWC was what FOTA is today until Ferrari suddenly switched sides after FIA/FOM made them an offer that would give them an unfair advantage.

Now Ferrari needs the support of its FOTA partners to force Max into making some changes to the 2010 rules so they can stay in F1. How ironic!

9

For Ferrari to sneer at prospective teams operating on a a smaller budget is unbelievable, pathetic. Since when was big beautiful? Or excellent, for that matter?

For all their size, for all their money, Ferrari have failed to perform, and have trailed behind smaller teams in the races. Last year they failed to win the driver’s title as a result of silly mistakes. This year they have been even worse.

Only fools and idiots equate size and financial muscle with excellence. Size is the sort of thing that impresses people of the calibre of Gordon Brown, i.e. the brain-dead. Is Brawn GP a lesser team than Ferrari because it’s smaller? No way.

I am sick of the politicking, the sneering, the whining, and the whingeing. The court has spoken. Move on. As far as I am concerned, those who want to get out of F1 are yesterday’s men. I hope they get out as soon as possible so the sport can reinvent itself with new blood. If Alonso doesn’t like it, then get out. But either put up or SHUT UP. Similarly Ferrari. But cut out the trouble-making NOW if you’re going to stay. Otherwise, good riddance.

Formula One is going to move on, with them or without them. That’s their choice. It’ll be different. So what? Times change.

10

A little harsh on Lola but pretty much bang on. A good little dig at Ecclestone too with the ticket price bit.

This is probably one of the best Ferrari press pieces since Montezemelo dedicated the 2007 championship to the bloke that worked in the copy shop. Cracking stuff!

11

Why don’t Ferrari stop being so childish and see if they can build a decent car for 2010? I am fed up with their arrogant attitude.

Their season has been a disaster and I would echo Niki Lauda’s comments about ‘spaghetti culture’. If you’re losing a contest, focus on winning it, not bleat about rule changes.

And to be honest, if they want to go, go on then! See how many people will tune into the Ferrari circus from Le Mans…..

12

Regardless of what they have said Bernie will not kill the goose that laided the golden egg.Ferrari are correct just not politically correct selling these noname’s to anyone is going to be very difficult Bernie know’s this.He will step in take over control and it will be all sorted and the new guy’s will be shafted thats usually what happens in F1.

13

It’s looking like it might be the reverse of 2005 – all the other teams slyly making hay with B&M and leaving Ferrari high and dry… sweet irony!

Having considered this over the past few days it’s obvious… B&M have had their fun and for a grand finale they’re simply going to return F! to the state it was in when they found it – lots of non-works teams, most of whom are meaningless, but they look pretty and make up numbers.

I’m a capitalist through and through, I 100% support Ferrari in their bid to leverage their previous investment – however, this is no time for embittered histrionics, they’re not playing clever or grown-up politics given the gravity of this situation and Max is running rings round them this week.

Either way, the likely outcome is that 99% of punters will give any future F1 incarnation a chance out of curiosity alone. F1 fans are famously hard to shake off.

If the first few races tick the boxes and the new teams show personality we’ll all be hooked by the time it gets to Europe and the soap opera will start all over again…

14

Ferrari are perfectly right. They have a brand name to protect, would you pay the same amount of money to watch a bunch of mickey mouse teams instead of Ferrari and co?? Its a joke. The best thing for Ferrari is to leave F1 and let the rest dig their own grave under Mosley and Ecclestone. As for the criticism directed towards Ferrari, it smacks of prejudice in my opinion.

15

Ferrari is just making a point on why they are saying goodbye to F1. I do believe Ferrari is serious in leaving and it will be such a great loss to F1. so too will the departure of the other teams. F1 cannot and should not be governed the way it is being governed now.

Ferrari did not mean to put down those teams, they just simply are telling the truth as to the present value of those teams.

In the recent climate that Max has created in F1, there is no more room for political correctness, the hard and truthful facts must be pointed out

In this instance Ferrari is arrogant, they should be arrogant and it is correct for them to be arrogant.

I congratulate them for being arrogant.

16

Ferrari are merely expressing the views of the casual audience. Who are these nobodies? Casuals don’t want to watch pikeys.

I don’t want to watch these reprobates either and I haven’t missed a race or qualifying session in over 22years.

Let’s go Le Mans Luca.

17

Ferrari need to grow up, they’re like a spoilt brat stamping on the ground crying the loudest. The prospect of new teams coming in and engineering their way to championship victory is far more exciting than the richest teams spending their way to wins.

I’d rather see exciting new challengers rather than Ferraris breaking down ad nausium. They talk about giving fans value for money, how about engineering cars that can make it to the end of a race? How about drivers who actually want to talk to the cameras pre-race? How about not being arrogant enough not to think they can soar through quali by sitting in the garage?

Honestly, I could take or leave Ferrari before this year’s championship, yet they’re taking the edge off what is an otherwise OUTSTANDING year just because they’re not getting it their own way.

18

Ferrari’s extraordinary hubris on this issue has made me realise that the sport may in fact end up better for their absence, rather than my knee-jerk, history-minded initial thought that their loss would be profoundly damaging.

The FIA’s plan looks to be introducing a Formula where survival of the cleverest, rather than the fittest, will be key. I’m totally comfortable with that as a framework for F1. If Ferrari choose not to rise to the technological, financial and intellectual challenge, then that’s more a reflection on their weakness than on any weakness in Formula 1.

Next season – with the rules as they currently stand – looks set to offer a greater number of teams and drivers than this year, plus an even bigger scope for the tearing up of the form book. OK, I fear that the staggeringly close time differentials, from pole position to the back of the grid, will be the first and most obvious casualty. But 2009’s thrill of the unexpected being continued into another year is a thought which nevertheless excites me.

19

Budget caps will be impossible to police effectively.

As such, why don’t the teams at the end of each season have to disclose their designs for that season to everyone meanign the lower spending teams can catch up a bit but keeping innovation (and secrecy) for the following year?

20

I simply don’t get this blind loyalty to Ferrari and “the manufacturers”. It’s as if all football supporters said “the league would be nothing without Manchester United”.

Ferrari come across as spoilt kids in all this I’m afraid. I actually feel sorry for Stefano Domenicali, because I suspect this is all being done above his head (as Max said the other day, the first Domenicali knew of the injunction application was when Max got a text during the meeting!)

21

There have been many great names in Formula 1 in the last 50 years who have had to leave for one reson or another, many of them won championships competing against the over hiped Ferarri team too. Great teams great men running them all gone now they are missed and not forgotten but not to the point that Formula 1 is less important without them.

I have one question here or is it two, will Ferarri walk away at the end of the season or will they now be summoned before the orld motor sport council on charges of bringing the sport into disrepute and be thrown out mid season. They do theirselves no favours and no credit by continually running to the courts in this manner.

Finally are they so convinced they are incapable of winning if they have the same budget as other teams and no extra cash above the funds available to other teams (extra tv rights money) to buy extra gizmos to entertain the croud like the ill fated traffic light stick seen last season.

22

I suppose that the European market will be familiar with the new teams coming in, but for a person who lives in Asia, I simply have no idea who they are. We don’t have the luxury of watching many forms of Motorsports, even on paid cable. So if Ferrari and other car manufacturers do leave F1, I would think viewership will be greatly affected, not to say buy such expensive tickets to watch it live. I can relate to car brands I’m seeing on the road and I do support Toyota cos I own one. It may be difficult to support a car whose name and engines I’m not familiar with or a driver who may be successful in other formulas, but which I have no access to. I agree with what Ferrari is trying to do, but not what they are saying to the press. I’m actually getting nervous about this.

23

If you sit quietly you can hear the sound of accountants panting in anticipation and sharpening their pencils and lawyers, a gleam in their eyes, rubbing their hands, completely unfazed by Gordon Brown’s attack on nearby tax havens, as in readiness, they open new bank accounts in far off untaxable lands.

24

I certainly wouldn’t spend £400+ on a grandstand ticket to watch Litespeed, Wirth, Lola, USGP, Epsilon, RML, Formtech, Campos, iSport & drivers I’ve never heard of.

I wouldn’t even get out of bed to watch them on TV.

25

Arrogance, whiners? Have you seen the comments from Monaco today? It seems like other teams and most drivers of other teams support Ferrari in this!

Mark Webber today just echoed what Ferrari claimed a week ago that Ferrari IS Formula One! Mario Theissen said that the special righs given to Ferrari (ie. veto) because of their tradition have been always well know to other teams and ACCEPTED BY THEM in contracts (source: http://www.motorsport-magazin.com/formel1/news-77766-teams-akzeptieren-ferraris-sonderrechte.html ).

If Ferrari is really nothing special, as some folks in Britain (journalists and fans) claim why do other teams accept Ferrari’s special rights at all? Why do drivers keep echoing the sentiment that Ferrari is Formula One?

Whether fans of other teams like it or not, Ferrari IS special to F1 and it is well accepted within F1!

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