Hot fun in Summertime
Budapest 2014
Hungarian Grand Prix
Momentum swings back towards ‘mentally strong’ Hamilton
News
Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 15.29.15
Posted By: Justin Hynes  |  07 Jul 2014   |  3:36 pm GMT  |  279 comments

Over the past month or so plenty of questions have been asked of Lewis Hamilton’s mental strength. From the moment team-mate Nico Rosberg spun at Mirabeau and sealed the pole position that set him up for a game-changing win in Monaco, Hamilton has been on the rack.

Prior to yesterday the Briton had seen Rosberg bank 68 points to his 36. Hamilton been widely tipped to dominate in Canada but had to watch as his less fancied team-mate stole pole and then the lion’s share of the possible points as Hamilton suffered a brake failure. He made another mistake in qualifying in Austria and was held at bay by his team-mate, despite a determined charge.

And right up to midway through yesterday’s British Grand Prix it seemed like more pressure would be heaped upon the 2008 champion.

Saturday saw Hamilton make yet another qualifying error as he opted out of a final lap and was forced to start sixth while Rosberg started on pole. The questions about Hamilton’s mental fragility were becoming a statement: the Briton had cracked.

The race though proved different and ultimately could be as game-changing as victory in Monaco was for Rosberg, who prior to that weekend had cut a forlorn figure under the onslaught of four straight Hamilton wins.

Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 15.28.46

For Mercedes motorsport chief Toto Wolff, Hamilton’s victory at his home race reversed all the speculation about the Silverstone winner’s resilience.

“Lewis drove a faultless race,” he told reporters afterwards. “But what I want to praise most of all is Lewis’ approach. He had a bad qualifying session but he arrived at the circuit [on Sunday] morning in such a positive frame of mind and determined to perform – and he did that for his home fans. It was a great performance that showed his mental strength.”

Wolff in particular pointed to Hamilton’s reaction to a problem during his first pit stop, which resulted in him being delayed at his pit box.

“One of the examples is we had another pit stop that wasn’t perfect on the left rear,” said the Mercedes boss. “The first thing he did, he came on the radio and said: ‘guys don’t worry, let’s make the next one better.’

“Different to what the perception is, he’s mentally very strong and he could cope well with having had problems.”

Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 15.30.16

Hamilton, meanwhile, spoke of his disappointment following Saturday’s qualifying error and his determination to rectify it.

“It was a kick in the balls and I had to pick myself up. I had to pull up my socks and get on with it if I wanted to win this championship,” he said. “It’s so difficult to really explain the feelings. When you feel like the world is crumbling beneath you, somehow with your family, friends and the fans, they help pull you through. After qualifying it was so hard. I really was almost speechless when I spoke to them (him family), and it was no one else’s fault but mine.

“I was just so disappointed in myself, so coming back today my priority was to turn that serious emptiness and negativity into a positive.”

He also said he felt sure he would have had the pace and the strategy to take the fight to Rosberg had gearbox failure not stopped the German on lap 29.

“It’s the first time this year that I had the different strategy,” Hamilton said. “He was going option, option, prime and I was going option, prime, option, and if I did a good enough job on the prime – as he has done in previous races – I could have attacked him on the option. That’s what I was looking forward to, but I’ll take it as it has come. Today is more [about] just solidifying belief in myself, and that recovery … I needed it, I needed it.”

Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 15.30.48

Rosberg, naturally, felt that he had the race under control and would have won comfortably. “I’m very confident I would have won the race,” he said. “Things were going well until that point. We had a good balance, I felt comfortable. What can I say? It’s just a reliability problem and a pity. That’s it.”

And so, once again, the title fight is finely balanced, with Hamilton now just four points adrift heading to the last two races before the summer break.

On Saturday in Silverstone, Rosberg spoke about momentum being with him, saying that he needed to maximise the opportunities available while it existed. “At the moment the momentum seems to be on my side and I just need to make the most of it because it comes and goes,” he said.

Yesterday it went, in the most debilitating style possible, and the championship battle has been reset.

The question now is whether Hamilton can stretch the feelgood factor of his home win through the coming races and also whether Rosberg can bounce back and channel some positivity from his own (second) home race in Hockenheim. For Wolff all is as it should be.

“We have seen the momentum swing to one side and then momentum swing to the other side and I guess they’re on a pretty equal level this season and it’s going to last until the last race of the season.”

 

Featured News
MORE FROM JA ON F1...
Share This:
Posted by:
Category:
Tags:
279 Comments
  1. Witan says:

    Rosberg is either cheering himself up or is on a different planet. The second stint showed that Hamilton had the ability to get something special out of the harder tyres. The timing of both drivers’ laps before any problem for Rosberg demonstrate the differential.

    It is also worth noting the Rosberg has given a different story to some journalists claiming he had problems at and immediately after the pit stop and that is why Hamilton was catching him. Odd then that Rosberg put in a fastest lap with those problems, isn’t it?

    1. Ross says:

      Rosberg was already experiencing intermittant problems before the bbc broadcast audio.

    2. Quercus says:

      Statistically, given that they drive identical cars, by the end of the season they should both have the same number of car-based issues, including DNFs. Clearly, removing the DNFs, Lewis is well up on Nico in the points, so in theory he should take the championship with ease.

      Having said that we’ll need to see who’s got luck on their side (clearly Rosberg up until Saturday night). The only question was, until this weekend, whether Hamilton was harder on his car. We’re now not so sure. Given that Lewis seems to be managing his tyres better and tends to use less fuel, one would think the answer is, again, Lewis should come out on top.

      1. Richard says:

        Some of the logic is flawed as there is no such thing as identical cars with manufacturing variability aside, set up variation can make quite difference to how the car performs. It’s a given though if a F1 car is at the front in clean air it has a better chance of finishing the race in terms of fuel, tyres, and brakes. That’s largely why Rosberg’s car survived and Hamilton’s didn’t. – I hope Mercedes have bottomed that one out.

      2. aezy_doc says:

        Could be one of the reasons Hamilton was happy to have a 5 second gap to Rosberg before the pitsops.

      3. aveli says:

        i think only the engineers who inspected hamilton’s car have the best idea why hamilton’s car failed during the race.

      4. Rott says:

        Could someone care to explain why lewisalways uses less fuel? Doesn’t gateman he’s not getting more out from his engine, or carrying less fuel at every race?
        If neither, isn’t he carrying dead weight that’s probably costing a few seconds in each race compared to his team mate?

      5. James Allen says:

        He told us on Thursday that he has a technique and that Rosberg had now found out what it was, so he expected that advantage to have gone

        So it was interesting on Sunday when he appeared to still have an edge there

      6. aveli says:

        may be rosberg needs a few goes to perfect that technique.

      7. Thompson says:

        Like fighting! you have a plan until the first punch is thrown. Then you start swinging like a…. er… someone who cannot throw a punch.

      8. C63 says:

        @Rott
        or carrying less fuel at every race?…

        I was reading on another site (Mark Hughes), at some races, LH car starts the race with as much as 10kg less fuel than NR – if I remember correctly this is worth around a 1/3rd of a second/lap.

      9. KRB says:

        C63, no way it’s that much of a difference. I watched the race again, and the FOM graphic showed their fuel usage as 1.57kg (ROS) vs 1.53 (HAM) per lap. So for 52 laps that’s 81.64kg for ROS, and 79.56kg for HAM. A difference of just 2 kgs. Other races it’s been over 3 kg.

      10. C63 says:

        @KRB
        here is a copy of Mark Hughes report from Bahrain:
        For a 57-lap race of the second-highest fuel demand circuit on the calendar – lots of high-speed braking into slow corners followed by lots of low-gear acceleration – that calculated out to just over 91kg for Hamilton and 99.75kg for Rosberg….

        My memory was playing tricks and it wasn’t quite 10kg, but I have been to sleep several times since I read the report and my memory was playing up :-)

    3. Peter Wells says:

      We all heard Rosberg on the radio complaining about his gears before LH started to catch him.
      Without a problem he would have won cleanly again

      1. Paige says:

        [mod]
        Hamilton had a good 2-3 tenths per lap during the first stint, before Rosberg’s problem. He got a 5.8 second advantage down to 2.8 at Rosberg’s first pit stop. Then Rosberg came out and started having the gearbox problem. Sure, that was when Hamilton was going 1-2 seconds faster than Rosberg, but that was as opposed to 2-3 tenths faster before the gearbox problem on equal tires.

        Hamilton was definitely quicker yesterday. Whether that would have resulted in a race win, I am not sure. But Hamilton’s pace on the prime tires was truly unexpected, and he probably would have been able to sustain it for longer than Rosberg in the middle stint.

      2. Kristiane says:

        I recall in Bahrain Lewis also pulled out something spectacular on the prime tyres in the final stages of the race where the race restarted behind the safety car, and he held off Rosberg who was on options, and eventually won the race.

        Had Rosberg not suffered any failures, I suspect Lewis would’ve given him a great challenge for P1 or even overtake him given the pace he had on primes.

      3. eric morman says:

        after Rosberg had his pit stop for new tires he made up 2secs on Hamilton before Hamilton pitted for hard tires, we are now talking in the 20 lap area when Hamilton started making 2/300th of a sec up on Rosberg,
        Hamitons tires are newer for one so should of been faster, when Rosberg set his fastest time Hamiton did a faster lap straight afterwards,
        both would have to have stopped again for fresh tires before the end of the race if Rosberg had finished,
        i suspect Rosberg would have won.
        i am a Hamilton fan but i am not blinded by the facts.

      4. KRB says:

        Eric, Nico was on newer options after his stop, Lewis on worn options, so of course Lewis was giving back time to him then. It wasn’t as much as it should’ve been though, Hamilton was still doing decent times all considered. That he then switched to the primes, and put in a fastest lap 9-tenths faster than Nico on options, should’ve foretold what was to come.

        Hamilton by then was into 1-stop range, but even if he pitted for options, I think he would’ve had Nico. The pass for the lead on track is coming for Lewis, though of course he’d rather sail off from pole like in MAL and CHN.

      5. Daniel says:

        Ow the irony “without a problem” “Rosberg would have won Cleanly again”

        Am I missing something? When has Rosberg won cleanly?

        He has won 3 races, first one Lewis DNF, second one Monaco… We all know what happened there. Third in Canada when Lewis messed up Quiali and had brake issues.

        People need to just face facts, Lewis is the better, faster, more mentally tough, what ever you want to dress it up as.
        If both drivers have a smooth weekend, Lewis will nearly always win.

        In any other season, Rosberg wouldn’t be anywhere near Lewis, but this year is very unique, as it is literally Lewis and Nico 1-2 every week, meaning Nico has been able to stay in touch when getting slapped and take full advantage when Lewis had his two DNF.

      6. RodgerT says:

        Nico did not win in Canada, he had the same problem Lewis did it just didn’t completely fail.

        Austria Lewis blew both of his qualy attempts all on his own and started 9th with Nico 3rd as the Williams locked out the front row. Nico won with Lewis 2nd.

      7. Kristiane says:

        +1

      8. AlexD says:

        But why Lewis doesnt make his weekends clean?

      9. tony says:

        Rosberg didn’t win in Canada btw

      10. Kev says:

        Rosberg won a clean race in austria

      11. aezy_doc says:

        Rosberg beat Lewis cleanly, fairly and squarely in Austria. He also nailed him in Monaco – discounting Saturday, the race itself was clean. Lewis has beaten Rosberg fairly and squarely in all but one of his victories – and that was this weekend.

      12. eddie says:

        Bue he wasn’t faster. He won the race because he got position on track to do it.

        Why we didn’t see Rosberg win a race with the same 20 seconds advantage Hamilton had on Malaysia and China?

        Because he isn’t faster than Hamilton. He won his races on saturdays. Even in Canada he pushed Hamilton out ot the track at the start because he knew he if he didn’t do that, he wouldn’t stand a chance.

      13. Gazza says:

        This is completely wrong.
        Hamilton once he had cleared Button was looking after his tyres dialling the car in, remember he had lost all his high fuel load practise time on Friday.
        From lap 10 he was consistently on average 3/10ths a lap quicker reducing the gap to a couple of seconds, hardly something Rosberg would have wanted before the first pit stop.
        This was all before Rosberg had the start of his gearbox problems on lap 20.
        Lewis had also looked after his tyres better so was able to run much longer at good lap times to make his first pit stop much later.
        Lewis was on a charge and I would have been surprised if Rosberg could have stopped him.
        All this from somebody who from the comments below is “mentally weak”
        Mostly sour grapes IMO.

      14. James Allen says:

        Read the Strategy Report later today, full of insights into what was happening

      15. aezy_doc says:

        James – could you help us with an insight on whether Lewis could have made a one stopper work and beaten Rosberg that way rather than passing him on track? Cheers.

      16. James Allen says:

        Yes it is all in the Strategy Report later today

      17. Purple Helmet says:

        It seems to me that Lewis was clearly planning to have the option of one-stopping – there is no other reason to do nearly half distance on one set of options.

        This would also explain why Lewis was slower in the early part of the race, dropping gradually down, but not seeming too concerned.

        At the end of Rosberg’s first stint, Lewis began catching him. It seems to me Rosberg’s tyres were probably still ok, the issue was almost certainly because he was starting to have gearbox problems. He went to new options, Lewis was still doing ok times in comparison on older tyres so stayed out and decided to go for one stop. What he didn’t know was that Rosberg was slow because of a gearbox issue that was going to get worse.

        Bottom line is that I don’t think Lewis would have done a one stop if Rosberg’s car was 100%, he only did that because he saw his times on old tyres were holding up to Rosberg’s times on new.

        Not sure who would have won, I think it would have been another close finish but Lewis would have had to pass Rosberg on the track and we know that is difficult.

      18. Richard says:

        No I think Hamilton was on a mission, and without critical brakes to stop him, it looked, even before his gearbox issues, like he was going to catch Rosberg fairly easily.

      19. JON_C says:

        Your kidding yourself if you think Rosberg would of won comfortably. Lewis was always going to catch Rosberg. Shame Rosberg retired

      20. aveli says:

        it’s not easy to win a would’ve could’ve argument.

      21. Michael says:

        @ Peter Wells Yes, I’m sure u would like to believe that. All I know is Hamilton was really fast on the hard (option) tire. The truth is nobody really knows.

      22. TimW says:

        Peter, well that’s nonsense. Lewis was quicker all weekend and had reduced the gap from 5 seconds to 3 seconds before the pit stop and before Nico had any problems with the gearbox. Watch the race again.

      23. Nickh says:

        The only race Rosberg has won clearly is Austria, by 1 second or something (not exactly huge margin). Lewis would have won all the other races and that is not even exaggerating.

        Australia: Lewis breaks down
        Malaysia: Lewis thrashes Rosberg
        Bahrain: Lewis beats Rosberg even with botched set up and safety car helping Rosberg
        China: Lewis thrashes Rosberg
        Spain: Lewis wins
        Monaco: Rosberg wins courtesy of dodgy qualifying tactics which most drivers/ex drivers thought was deliberate but no penalty.
        Canada: Lewis gets ahead of Rosberg in pit stops and DNF
        Austria: Rosberg wins first race on merit against Lewis
        Silverstone: Lewis wins courtesy of DNF but was catching Rosberg on better strategy on hard tyres before gearbox problem.

      24. Joe flacco says:

        So when Lewis doesn’t finish, rosbergs wins lack merit……when rosberg retires, Lewis was catching him so it’s ok!

        I think what your saying is, if rosberg is in the lead, Lewis deserves to win. If Lewis retires from the race it’s certain rosberg couldn’t have caught him….if rosberg is in the lead then Lewis must have a por strategy. Mate, your onto something. Keep it up

      25. Ash says:

        @ Nickh

        Spot on…

    4. Matt H says:

      Rosberg was yet to run the hard tyre and everybody went better on the hard than expected, not just Lewis so no special magic there

      Also Rosberg may well have been able to set a fast lap with the problem IF the problem was intermittent.

      As it was the hard tyre seemed the better race tyre on the day so Lewis ‘should’ have won by running it twice to Rosbergs once….although in reality I think Lewis was one stopping but has kept that up his sleeve.

      1. Daniel says:

        You’ve sort of contradicted yourself.

        You say Lewis had no magic, then say he would have been able to run the hard tyres twice. You then say you think he was one stopping.

        If Rosberg would have had no issues, Lewis would prob have easily won because the hards were so quick.

      2. TimW says:

        I think Lewis would have won because he was quicker than Nico and overtaking is possible at Silverstone.

    5. Pkara says:

      Totally agree with gou Witan. Hamilton did a stella job.
      Rosberg The SPIN WIZARD (on a media level & on a Monaco track yellow flag level) always has an answer whatever the occasion & journalists lap it up by the bucket load. Meanwhile Lewis is critised for breathing loudly !
      Lewis pushed hard on the first tyres (even after his march upwards) overtaking from the Get Go he still nurtured his tyres so he could get more laps out after Rosberg had pitted.
      Lewis came in for his pit stop (slow change by pit crew as always ;-) ) he then mounted a charge on hard tyres & went on the hunt. Lewis would’ve passed Rosberg & the British crowd cheering would give Lewis an extra second (as Nigel Mansell said ” Home crowd gave an extra second on my performance)
      So well done Lewis go on the attack at the next races.

      1. Joe flacco says:

        He didn’t pass him….rosberg retired. We didn’t get to see Lewis commit another costly error.

  2. Andy says:

    Hamilton has always been mentally weak, he carries too much baggage. There’s no doubt that yesterday’s win will boost him, but so far this season it’s generally reliability that has split Hamilton and Rosberg. I’m not convinced that Hamilton would have been able to pass Rosberg if he hadn’t had problems, this will run to the end of the season and all we can hope is that the championship is settled before the final race. No one should be crowned World Champion as a result of the double points debacle.

    1. Quercus says:

      Hamilton is emotional, which is not at all the same as saying he’s mentally weak. When the chips are down he fights like hell. I think you will be proved wrong.

      I agree with your last sentence. imagine the Mercedes drivers come in one and two for the rest of the season and one of them manages to win more than the other to build up 49 point lead. Then think how he and we fans would feel if he had a DNF at the last race, leaving the other to walk away with 50 points and take the championship. They should drop the stupid double points idea right now.

      1. Andy says:

        I agree with you that Hamilton is emotional, but it has affected his driving and therefore he is mentally weak. At that level, if you bring your personal life to work you are mentally weak, and that’s what Hamilton sometimes does.

        What I don’t understand about the double points is, all the teams had a vote, yet they knew it was a bad idea. What was Bernie offering in return for the vote?

        Bernie and the teams should have no say in the running of the sport, it should be down to the FIA, but since Max left the FIA have become a bit spineless.

      2. Pkara says:

        Must have alot of Forum posters with Sports Psychology majors?
        Lewis is not weak he does not choke. He’s a world champion Second youngest World Champion. That is a record that only one racer has surpassed. ..that is Vettel. So us mere mortals would not have the skill or the ability to perform at that level. It is truely gob smackingly absurd to call any F1 driver mentally weak (with the slight excepition of Mr Crash Maldonado whos temper gets the better of him at times. He uses his car as a weapon at when he sees red).

      3. Drgraham lewis says:

        Strange comments… He beat a double champ in his first year. Won against a better car in his second and has managed to win races in a frankly useless car most years since. He has spent most of his career team mates with other far mor experienced world champions (the only racer other than Alonso this year to do so) and he is mentally weak?

        27 race wins of which most were in the red bull years suggests otherwise…

      4. Terry says:

        Have to agree with you re the many sports psychologists we have visiting this site PKara.
        It was LH’s emotional weaknesses that saw him have 2 DNF’s eh.

      5. Ash says:

        I mean…are you really mentally weak when you beat Alonso in your rookie year with equal equipment?…..

        Then go on to win the title in your 2nd year in F1 with the second fastest car….

        I have to say this article mentions no sign of Rosberg’s good fortune thus far, and the luck one as gained but wants to delve deep into Lewis’s “mental strength”.

        “The questions about Hamilton’s mental fragility were becoming a statement: the Briton had cracked”.

        “Hamilton on the rack”

        And these statements come from our own journalists….doing there upmost to consistently trying destabilise one of our own….whose on the verge of true greatness winning a title in two different teams in the modern era, and is now the worlds most marketable athlete.

        The creme always rises to the top!!!

      6. Ben says:

        Wow wow, Hamilton is not mentally weak he is just English. As an English person who enjoys sport I can tell you that it is in our blood that we can’t just win things easily! We either fail spectacularly (world cup) or somehow win by the skin of our teeth. Even when we have everything in our favour and it looks like we are destined to win by miles the gods conspire against us to make it hard. Let’s face it Hamilton has got the edge in nearly all areas this season (qualifying, race pace, tyre management, fuel management etc.) but Rosberg has just been more consistent. The wind is in his sails now and I really can’t see him losing it but I can guarantee it will not be easy, there will be more twists and turns, there will be more controversies and with the much hated double points it ensures it will not be over till the fat lady sings!
        Being a British sports fan is hard work but it means when we do win we appreciate it so much more – Could you imagine being American and dominating the Olympics every 4 years? – Boring!

    2. aveli says:

      may be hamilton is allowed to be mentally weak but we’re yet to invent a way of measuring mental strength. until then……….

  3. Sebee says:

    I don’t know if this is entirely true.

    Nico got the upper hand in Austria through a faultless drive. All that happened here is his gearbox let go.

    I think for a memontum swing what needed to happen is Lewis needed to beat Nico on track in a fair battle and a killer pass, and then Nico’s gearbox should have let go with 3 laps left after as a cherry on top to offset Australia.

    This was a much needed recovery after recent run, but Lewis is still on fragile footing.

    What he needs to do is beat Nico in Germany in a fair fight. Then momentum truly shifts in a big way if that happens. What he also needs to stop doing is giving a motivational quotes to the German faction on the team and to Nico in the form of… “I know whilst it (Hockenheim) is Nico’s home grand prix, he doesn’t have even one eighth of the support us Brits get here,” said Hamilton at Silverstone.

    1. John Marshall says:

      Ham has beaten Ros in a fair fight…several times.

      I’m not taking anything away from Ros. I think he’s driving a nearly faultless season. But, the biggest difference between the two drivers is reliability. I’m sure there are mental ebbs and flows for both drivers; there always are. But, I doubt either driver is going to crumble under the pressure. They’ve both been around a while and dealt with pressure.

      Now that the tables are basically reset, I’d like to see the rest of the season be fought without reliability issues being a factor. Even moreso, I hope the ridiculous double points last race doesn’t decide the championship, because otherwise, it’s shaping up to be an all-time classic.

      1. REva says:

        Spot on John,

        consistency is keeping (and will continue to keep) Rosberg in the fight. Hamilton needs that consistency if he’s going to win the WDC. Without doubt he;s the fastest but he’s making too many small mistakes compared to Rosberg.

      2. Quercus says:

        Unless you’re saying that the Lewis’s DNFs were his own fault, what you claim doesn’t stack up. Take the Mercedes’ DNFs out of the equation and Rosberg would be way behind Hamilton in the points.

        Lewis might seem to make more mistakes, but that’s because he’s driving nearer to the ragged edge (ie faster). The faster you are the more risks you take. All that matters is that the benefits from having the speed outweigh the disadvantages of making the odd mistake. Lewis knows exactly what he’s doing and unless all the luck goes Nico’s way, he’ll come out on top.

      3. rudeboy rana says:

        Hear hear!

    2. C63 says:

      @Sebee
      he doesn’t have even one eighth of the support us Brits get here,” said Hamilton at Silverstone…

      Last year at the German GP there were only just over 50,000 spectators on race day (compared to 125,000 at Silverstone) and that was with a German driver leading the WDC and on his way to a 4th WDC. So whilst I think Ham’s quote was not meant to be taken literally, and was more a figure of speech, he does have a point. It would appear the Germans don’t really have the same enthusiasm for F1 that the Brits do.

      1. Sebee says:

        Yes, I guess you could spin it like that. It could turn out to be a motivator for the German fans to show up and Lewis could end up being the top salesman and the “bad guy” who motivate the fans to come out.

        Then again, as I mentioned, it could just as easily be taken as a dig at German fans, German GP or anti-German in general. Bit risky to piss on your Team’s home race too German drive’s support. He should reserve such statements in my view, go in there, win for the Team, dedicate the win to the Mercedes Factory workers – kiss a few babies and move on. Take the high ground another words. He just won his home GP, through some luck undoing his Saturday errors. No need for digs, know what I mean? There was a was to big up British fanst without throwing other fans under the bus.

        Plus, we could also discuss Nico’s Germanisity to be honest. :-)

      2. Sebee says:

        Or should that be Germanicity or Germanism? Ladies and Germs, help out.

      3. Gaz Bpy says:

        Don’t you find it telling that he has chosen the nationality of his mum rather than his WDC father?
        I think Jenson Button could technically have raced under a South African license, as his mum Simone was born and grew up in Cape Town…….
        Or Danny Boy could have raced under an Italian license too because his mum and dad are from Repubblica Italiana…………
        Why don’t they just race under the national license under the country they grew up in eh? Danny and Jenson did, but Rosberg Junior wants to honour his mum……………….fair enough, mum knows best!

      4. Erik says:

        And that’s precisely why I’m no Hamilton fan. He gets a sniff of the higher ground and suddenly in his mind he is far superior and doesn’t mind letting everyone know. Going into Germany that wasn’t smart irrespective of his intentions – wasnt very clever was it? The best champions are also very clever – Senna, Prost, Alonso, Schumacher, all very clever people.

        He has a few bad results and his world is ‘crumbling’ around him as James quoted him in this article. I don’t think Rosberg is the best driver on the grid, but I do hope he sends Lewis home to mummy for good after this season – and yes, let it be through bad unreliability, poor pitstops, and whatever he wants to cry about so that everyone can see how screwed up his mental game is – you just have to listen to the way he talks to his crew on the radio during a race to see that, ‘man’, and the way his engineer has to be so delicate speaking back to him.

        Lewis Hamilton – whatever.

      5. C63 says:

        @Sebee
        In truth, I doubt that Hamiltons comment regarding the British v German support was an attempted dig – ill advised maybe, but not a dig. I suspect it was more likely something he mentioned in passing that (as usual) was subsequently reported out of context and analysed to the n’th degree and then blown up into something it never was. As another poster mentioned, Hamilton only has to breathe slightly differently or tread on the cracks in the pavement and the media is all over it.
        On the matter of Rosbergs Germanicity – I would say he has a rather flimsy claim to being a German and it is more a ‘flag of convenience’. I believe he was born in Germany but spent pretty much his entire life in Monaco, having been schooled there from a young age. On that basis I would say he is a Monegasque and not a German.
        On a different note (James or anyone else, please), I have been away for a couple of weeks and am not up to speed regarding email notifications of replies – I didn’t receive notification of this reply. What is the state of play on this matter? I find it quite tedious having to trawl through the posts trying to find mine and see what has been said. Thanks

      6. kenneth chapman says:

        what about ‘germaness’ or ‘germanicality’ hahaah

      7. Sebee says:

        I’m going to have to ask you to use that in a sentence kennth, especially germanicality.

        Perhaps mannschaftness is proper today?

      8. kenneth chapman says:

        @ sebee…..’.rosberg exhibits his ‘germanicality’ by his attention to detail which in turn is a characterisitic of his germanic upbringing’…..is this good enough for you? hahaha

      9. kenneth chapman says:

        just as an aside my best friend has a german girlfriend and he spends quite a lot of time in germany. i have asked him several times how the german population in general and motorsport fans specifically perceive vettel. he said that from his perspective vettel was not universally liked and was seen by quite few people as being too big headed.

        maybe vettel wasn’t as popular at home as many people think. that may well be why the attendance figures were low. i personally have no idea but my friend is deeply embedded in the F1 fraternity and i listen to what he says.

      10. Sebee says:

        Check link below comment kenneth, Lewis himself “responded” on the subject. ;-)

      11. Sebee says:

        C63,

        Turns out Lewis was reading my chat about Germanicity, and chimed in! :-)

        http://www.planetf1.com/news/3213/9375284/Hamilton-Rosberg-s-Not-Really-German

      12. Sebee says:

        Funny stuff.

        You know, Nico looks German, talks German, had the most famous German as a teacher for 3 years, and even has a German Mom would you believe it. Keke found a lovely lady to marry and moved there. Funny that Lewis would take this on, a bit of a pot kettle scanario, considering by Lewis’ standards he’s not really British, he is Grenadian, not to be mixed up with Canadian who also has Queen on the money. :-)

        Hey, didn’t Lewis move to Monaco so that he could skip some taxes to Her Majesty? Isn’t he living there right now next to Nico? Since it’s only Lewis’ mum who was born in the UK, is he really British?

        Newsflash to Lewis – your situation is EXACTLY like Nico’s, only he did it first and you’re following his footsteps. :-)

      13. aveli says:

        rosberg said he was wi hamilton when hamilton was asked about rosberg’s nationality and that it was the interviewer who asked all the questions. hamilton did say rosberg wasn’t really german but interviewer asked the questions and hamilton answered yes and no to them.

      14. TimW says:

        Sebee, maybe you should find out how many F1 drivers actually live in their country of origin before you have a dig at Lewis, where does your favourite driver live? If you had the choice of living in a country and paying 50% income tax or another where it is 0%, where would you choose to live? Remembering, of course that F1 drivers spend very little time at home.

      15. Sebee says:

        C63…I’m saying it…because it’s that kind of a wacky day.

        Silverstone is not Lewis’ home grand prix. After all, Monaco is where he lives.

        Please, feel free to discuss. :-)

      16. C63 says:

        @Sebee
        Silverstone is not Lewis’ home grand prix..

        There were about 125,000 people at the British GP who would disagree with you ;-)
        BTW, using your method for deciding which country is a drivers home GP neither of your two favourite Germans have ever raced at their home GP – they don’t allow motor racing in Switzerland!

      17. Kingszito says:

        @sebee I know u jump on every opportunity to criticizes Lewis. Below link was Nico’s response to that report, but I believe it doesn’t matter to you as you might have formed your opinion against Lewis even before he started racing.

        http://www1.skysports.com/f1/news/24207/9376107/nico-rosberg-has-downplayed-reports-that-lewis-hamilton-said-he-wasn8217t-german

    3. Andy says:

      I’ve always been unsure about Rosberg’s ability, but he seems to be the equal of Hamilton in my opinion. On the other hand, Button was the equal of Hamilton over 3 years at McLaren. This points to Hamilton to being a fast driver, but not necessarily a good all round driver.

      Like you, I suspect the final race will ruin the season rather than ‘spice it up’, as per Bernie and the teams ridiculous idea. If the title is decided at the final race, the championship winners achievement will be permanently tarnished as a result, if the same result was not possible by the regular points system.

      And they wonder why they aren’t appealing to the younger audience, perhaps it’s something to do with the fact that those in power are concerned with their own self interest rather than the sport. Yes it’s a business, but at least run it like professionals.

      1. Rockman says:

        In an equal fight, Lewis will always beat Rosberg 9 times out of 10.

        The only real reason he’s second with 4 less points is all due to more reliability issues. Imagine if Hamilton had the same run of luck as Rosberg’s had?

        And mentally, both of them are very strong. The only real flaw in Lewis’ head is his merry go round relationship with Nicole. Everytime they’ve broken up, he has a dip in performance. As a human being this is a good thing because it shows Lewis as being emotional and wears his heart on his sleeve. But hopefully he can learn to block this emotion in the future in case this happens again.

        BTW, double points in the final race has got to be one of the worst to happen in F1 regulations. Like someone pointed above, imagine if Lewis or Nico has built up a 49 point lead only to DNF on the last race and the other driver takes the win with double points!

      2. aveli says:

        we can’t just imagine the race results and make it real. we will have to wait to find out at the end of the season if any of this is significant. we’ll see after the next two races before the summer break and see how the rest of the second half goes.

      3. Ash says:

        Rosberg is equal to Hamilton……

        And Button was equal to Hamilton…..

        Looool….ok!!!

      4. Kay-gee says:

        lol indeed

    4. furstyferret says:

      You do realise lewis has beaten rosberg 4 times this season before the brit gp “in a fair fight” i asume after the oz gp you posted that rosbergs win was not really worthy because ham started the race with 5 cylinders,blimey these anti ham fans, they give the guy no credit whats so ever, yes he’s flawed and sometimes you wish he would just shut up sometimes, but generally he delivers

    5. Drgraham lewis says:

      You clearly have been watching another series! He has beaten Rosberg fairly every time there has been such an occasion.

      And he was complimenting the fans – not doing anyone down..
      further – not once has Rosberg commented on his lucky wins or Hamiltons DNF – at least Hamilton is polite enough to do so… Until this race which was interesting

    6. kenneth chapman says:

      @ sebee….yes, you’re right. no one can really know the outcome had rosberg’s car not let go. in the past hamilton has not put that ‘killer’ pass on rosberg and i think it is fair to say that i very much doubt he could’ve done it at silverstone given the previous hisory as a guideline.

      when hamilton does this on a regular basis then i will concede that he is marginally better than rosberg, at this point in time.

      1. Drgraham lewis says:

        Actually over the years Hamilton has put far more killer passes on Rosberg…
        Best have a look back over the years before such comments let alone just looking at the first five races this year.
        I do not think its an exaggeration to say Hamilton is one of the best overtakes in the business and while Rosberg is having a virtually faultless season, his (longer than Hamiltons) F1 career has hardly been littered by stunning moves or fantastic drives through the field.

        If reliability was equal this year Hamilton would be far ahead regardless of the one or two qualifying blips.

        How do you square that if Rosberg has, as you say, not received some ‘killer’ moves?

      2. kenneth chapman says:

        hamilton trips himself up here as he says that rosberg is not a german yet he ends the quote by saying ,’it is always good to beat someone on their HOME TURF’. kinda ridiculous eh? if rosberg is not german how can hockenheim be rosbergs HOME TURF’.

        [mod]

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        i am referring to this year as that is what we are discussing particularly as we are seeing two cars which are streets ahead of anyone else.

        i am not interested in previous seasons as they are history and if you had been following the overall discussion that would be quite apparent.

      4. Quercus says:

        I have only one response to that: Bahrain.

      5. C63 says:

        +1
        I seem to recall one or two killer passes from Lewis on Nico at Bahrain. Additionally when Nico had the opportunity at the end of the race , on the quicker tyres, he could not make a pass stick. That has to be one of the all time displays of defensive driving IMO .

      6. Sebee says:

        Again, didn’t Lewis use passing mode to defend in Bahrain making him look mega?

      7. C63 says:

        @Sebee
        Again, didn’t Lewis use passing mode to defend in Bahrain making him look mega?…

        No, it was Nico that used the forbidden engine mode in Bahrain (and still couldn’t get the job done). Lewis used it in Spain.
        You should write this down because you make the same mistake every time the matter is discussed ;-)

      8. Kingszito says:

        @Sebee get ur facts correct. Nico was the person that used the passing mode in Bahrain, Lewis returned the favor in Spain.

      9. alexander supertramp says:

        @ Sebee,

        No, Nico was the one using the “forbidden” setting in Bahrain. Lewis did it in Spain. Get your facts right ;)

      10. Ash says:

        I have to say that Bahrain was embarrassing for Nico….it really was!!!

        Just Imagine if the roles were reversed….

        The media would be going to town on Lewis….

    7. Mark says:

      In a straight fair fight with no DNFs Lewis has beaten Nico at least three times this season. The best one being Bahrain where Nico should have easily passed Lewis after the safey car reset.

      1. Ash says:

        Good to see that some people actually watch the races….

      2. Joe flacco says:

        I watched the one where he got stuck in the gravel trap…..and the one a week after when he pressed the pit lane speed button and then Massa moved over so Kimi could be champ……otherwise it was Nando!!

      3. Ash says:

        @ Joe

        Loool….

        Was that the year he got stuck in gravel trap but still managed to beat Alonso in equal equipment?

        Or was it in 2008….when he became the youngest WDC in the history of the sport at that time?….

        If you could please remind me that would be much appreciated….

    8. TimW says:

      Sebee, Nico’s drive wasn’t faultless in Austria, did you not see him lose the car and drive completely off the track in the race? If there had been a gravel trap instead of a tarmac run off he would have been out on the spot, a lucky boy again!

      1. Sebee says:

        Maybe because he was busy trying to figure out wha the heck is going on with his gearbox?

        Distracted driving, learn from pro’s mistakes! Don’t text (or try to find another gearbox mode mid race) and drive people. :-)

  4. neil says:

    Have to agree with Toto, that radio call after the slow pit stop was just what people wanted to hear – no petulance, no complaining, just positives. This is the sort of thing you expect from a champion.

    1. Random 79 says:

      +1

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        A driver should always remember who pays his (considerable) salary!
        Speaking of which, apparently Lewis has bigger pay cheques than Rosberg Junior……….

      2. TimW says:

        of course he does, he is a world champion and the faster driver.

    2. erik says:

      You hear what they want you to hear. Much same as articles they fed you to read and comment. It is just a game and as long people who control the info are in their comfort zone it carries on like this. Just think and use your head more. Thanks.

      1. Joe B says:

        So Erik, is strongly disliking Hamilton the way to get out of the ‘game’ that those controlling us have us all playing? Because I strongly dislike Vettel and feel no more or less in the loop for that fact. But then I’m not sure what to think, because if I use my head I can see that you don’t give Hamilton any due credit at all regardless of his achievements, and that your posts could just be taken as the ramblings of a man with an agenda. Please clarify. Thanks.

      2. C63 says:

        +1
        Lol :-)

      3. Quercus says:

        Erik is displaying what psychologists call ‘projection’. He assumes everyone else has the same attitude he has, only the other way round.

      4. erik says:

        Yes. If one apple falls others stay attached. What activity is more visible- hanging on the tree or falling down part. The purpose is to fall down finally. If another fall you take it natural. Then i call it hypocritical.
        All i want to do is give different perspective but your response is closer to point thah the others. Thanks.

      5. aveli says:

        this is true erik, jackie stewart wants the world to believe that senna crashed more times than all the f1 champions put together so he has a video interview on youtube with senna saying “if there is a gap………” but nothing about senna denying the part about the number of crashes. i watched the version of that interview on TV and senna told him that he was lying. shame on stewart trying to paint a false image of senna.

    3. Deeno says:

      THATS true about HAM messages over the radio. The media and some Lewis “haters” would never comment on how calm he was after ANOTHER slow pitsop.

      It is funny how ALO and VET can have a epileptic fit over the radio and it is ocndidered not newsworthy.

  5. Gaz Boy says:

    Folks, its going to be a topsy turvy season between Lewis and Rosberg Junior. It’s half way through the season (ish) and the points standings it is virtually a dead heat…………….seconds out, on to second half of the season, round two!
    All I can say is thank goodness that Merc F1 have employed two drivers who are very evenly matched. Great. Some races Lewis will have the upper hand, some Nico. Twas ever thus in a dominant team with two equally matched drivers.
    Remember 1978, Andretti and Peterson in the dominant Lotus 79? Ronnie was contractually obliged to follow Mario home, which they did with Mario first 4 times in that black and gold season. Or 2000 to 2004 when Ferrari cast Rubens into the role of the “cleaner” role – as in to clean up when Michael has an off day – a la Hockenhiem 2000 for example?
    Exactly! Thank goodness us spectators have a situation where two drivers in the same time can fight for the WDC with gloves off.
    On a slightly different note, albeit Merc related, but I have to disagree with N Lauda’s comments on the race stoppage. Niki said the race should have not been red flagged to repair the damaged barrier. Sorry Mr Lauda, I disagree entirely. Surely Niki remembers the 1975 Spanish GP at Montjuich Park where the barriers hadn’t been bolted together properly? Rolf Stommolen (Hill-Ford) crashed into the aforementioned Armco when his rear wing fell off; the barriers gave way, vaulting the car and the accident pitched Stommolen into the crowd, killing 5 spectators and seriously injuring 10 people. Racing drivers are paid to take risks Niki, but that doesn’t apply to the spectators. I dread to think what would have happened if a car had also crashed into damaged Armco……………appalling tragedy is my guess.
    Stopping the race was a pain in the posterior for our mates Down Under watching in Oceania (it was probably early morning by the time the race finished in Australia and New Zealand) – although a beneficiary for TV viewers in the New World as the race would have re-started at a more pleasant time for the East Coast Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico coast! – but it was still the right thing to do.

    1. JakobusVdL says:

      Yep it went on late 2:30am the race fnished here in NZ, on monday morning. Made for a slow day at work, but watching the vettel vs alonso batle made it worthwhile ;-)

      1. Gaz Bpy says:

        I can only apologise to our friends Down Under in Oceania for the delay, but the barrier had to be replaced. Had it not, Silverstone would have been prosecuted by the UK Health and Safety Department for negligence and most likely been slapped with a huge fine and a withdrawal of its racing license – it really is that serious.
        I would imagine in Western Europe and the English speaking countries that the Health and Safety laws are also very strict when it comes to competitive motoring and the implications that a circuit being declared negligent would mean it would be prosecuted.
        I’m sure you have heard of Bruce and Denny – Denny used to live in Walton on the Thames Valley , and I’m sure Bruce lived in that area as well .I actually think Macca should paint their cars tangerine as a tribute to their Kiwi founders!
        PS Whose idea was it to put the International Date Line just before Oceania?

      2. JakobusVdL says:

        100% agree with the need to repair the barrier, putting drivers, Marshalls and spectators at risk Isn’t justified by TV scheduling pressures
        The dateline a conference in Antwerp In 1876 sorted that, NZ and Aussie interests represented by the Motherland, no Asian nations represented
        On the upside, Our Weekend has started by the time you guys get up on a Friday morning ;-)

  6. Joe S says:

    The momentum isn’t really with Hamilton. He won through Rosberg’s retirement and may not have won if Rosberg had been fine. Whoever wns in a straight fight is who the momentum is with.

    And that’s quite a few Hamilton-related articles in a few days. The one after the post-qualifying article and this one would be unlikely to have been written if it was most other drivers.

    1. Quercus says:

      And how many times do you think Rosberg has won because of Hamilton’s retirement? It works both ways.

      1. glennb says:

        Yes it does work that way, you are right. But you are only as good as your last win and Lewis won following a Nico retirement. He desperately needed to beat him on track. Having said that, he closed in by 25 points which is all that matters at the end of the day, points. Personally I think Lewis should go the reverse psychology route. Come out saying that Nico is the fastest guy in the field and that he himself can only try his best to beat him. Pretty much the same as Alonso has been saying about his Ferrari the last few years ;)

      2. RodgerT says:

        This year?

        Once, Australia. Hamiltons other DNF came in Canada where Ricciardo won when Rosberg had the same, yet non-fatal, problem with his car.

    2. David Young says:

      Totally agree. Lauda was right about F1 being over regulated, but you can never over regulate safety.

      1. kenneth chapman says:

        statistically, the odds of another incident at that precise point would be off the planet. it was really really stupid to hold the race up for such a long time. just another example of the ‘nanny state’ attitude of F1 at this point in time.

      2. C63 says:

        Interesting view point – when you agree with the authorities/stewards, they are the experts, they have all the available data and we, mere armchair observers, are not qualified to make a judgement. Now you are saying they are fools who don’t know what they are doing.
        Which is it – do they know what’s what, or not ;-)

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        @ C63…..when judgement calls are made vis-a-vis racing incidents between drivers, yes, i do tend to go with the stewards as they have visual and recorded data upon which to make accurate assessments. nothing wrong with that although a lot of people tend to think that seated comfortably in their lounge whatever they are more qualified to get it right!

        you know as well as i do that the armco business bears absolutely no comparison with the above. now you are entitled to your opinion about how i present but i would urge you to sit back and contemplate what i have said. i do think that my last post explains why i see the delay as entirely stupid/dumb whatever. even niki lauda agrees with me and he is far more astute in matters F1 that i will ever be. needless to say a lot of people also think that niki has lost it but i do beg to differ.

        he is no fool and anyone on this board that thinks they know more than niki are simply fooling themselves.

        so after all that hot air back to your question and my answer….sometimes they do and sometimes they don’t. hahaha

      4. C63 says:

        @KC
        Just to be clear, I am not disagreeing with your assessment of the situation. My point was the double standards you appear to have afforded yourself when it comes to the authorities knowing best. In principle this is no different to the stewards making decisions regarding a racing incident. Sure they have more information, video footage, telemetry etc, but you can’t deny the race officials have more information than you regarding the damaged barrier. So why/how are you suddenly more qualified than the folks who were at the scene? The officials either know best or they don’t.
        I cant see how you can have it both ways – running with the hare and the hounds if you ask me ;-)

      5. kenneth chapman says:

        @ C63….hahaha you still haven’t come to grips with tenet of my post. like the time when the psychologist asked the patient, ‘do you have problems making decisions’ to which the patient replied ‘yes and no’.it is not a matter of semantics, it is a matter of distinguishing one event from another.

        however all is cool and i will not bore you with any more explanations as it is now history and time to move on.

    3. alexander supertramp says:

      1. Lewis has beaten Nico in a fair fight more times than the other way around.
      2. Lewis “sells”, your post is a good example of this.

      1. Joe flacco says:

        Lewis sells out……Lewis is normal…….Lewis gets angry……Lewis says stupid things…….Lewis makes mistakes…..lewis drives fantastically……..Lewis crashes………Lewis wins……people say he’s more mature and is gonna dominate F1……….Lewis does something stupid……….Lewis loses to teammate…….Lewis in crisis…….Lewis wins……..people say it’s the new more mature Lewis on show……dominate f1…….rinse and repeat

      2. Ash says:

        Loooool!!!!!

  7. Ben says:

    It very much looks like the momentum will now be with Hamilton. He has made a few mistakes in qualifying recently which has always been his strong point and has had the lions share of bad luck as well. In hindsight he really screwed up on Saturday but it is easy to see why he made that mistake with his delta over a second down on his original lap time but it is a lesson that he has learnt and you can be sure he won’t make that mistake again. I really think Hamilton is now favourite for the title!

    I do want to say what a great job Williams have done – getting the Mercedes power for this year was definitely the best thing they have done but it looks like the rest of the car is great as well. They had a good showing at Canada and Austria but it was thought that the circuit was particularly well suited to their car but that they would struggle (compared to Red Bull) at the fast sweeping corners of Silverstone that would be better suited to the RB chassis. After this weekend it is clear they have the 2nd best car! With half the season remaining I think 2nd in the constructors is definitely on. Can they maintain the momentum? Will they be aggressive enough on strategy or be conservative to bank points? Do they have enough finances to keep up with the development race? Will the drivers be consistent enough for the rest of the season?

    1. Andy says:

      Presumably Vettel, Rosberg and Button were also well down after two sectors but they didn’t throw in the towel.

      It was fantastic to see Bottas and Williams doing so well, hopefully they can maintain it and progress even further, although consistancy hasn’t been their strong point recently.

      1. Hal says:

        In a BBC article they said Button was apparently encouraged by his team to finish the lap even though he didn’t think he would improve. Hamilton on the other hand was told do decide and not to hold Rosberg up so he (wrongly) decided to abort. So yes the final decision was his and therefore he should (and rightly did) take the blame but his team didn’t exactly encourage him like Mclaren did.

        By the way Hamilton rarely gives up – what happened Saturday was just bad judgement and to be honest after seeing the first two sectors pretty much everyone around me thought it would not amount to anything. We were all shocked to see first Vettel then the others come from nearly two second behind Hanilton’s provisional pole after first two sectors to then beat him by a few seconds.

        Regards to his mental strength – I saw him do an interview (couple hours after quali) at Merc merchandise shop and he was very honest about his disappointment but also showed a determination to do well as well as giving some light hearted responses. He may have needed a bit time to get it together but he did.

  8. BluesPaul says:

    Off Topic James, please

    Have you seen or talked to Kimi after the accident? Can you confirm he is def OK?
    47G is close to a fatal impact

    1. James Allen says:

      I did not see him, but I’m told he is ok and will drive in Germany

      1. glennb says:

        James. I read somewhere (unconfirmed) that the first thing Kimi said over the radio, following the accident was “Is Felipe OK?”. Have you heard this?

      2. kenneth chapman says:

        should the other drivers give him a wide berth?

  9. ED says:

    PLEASE stop making more of these “mind” games than is reality. The drivers themselves are starting to believe this stuff that the media is concocting to fill in blank spaces. These are just people with no super powers & the cars are just machines & stuff happens, like gearbox failures, or driver errors. Let it go at that. It’s ugly to read the stuff about interpersonal battles, fighting, conspiracy theories.

    1. James Allen says:

      If you talk to the teams and the people working with the drivers they see it differently

      They are only too aware of how much of F1 goes on in the head..

      1. Erik says:

        I can understand that the media have to write about something, this year the mental game is in vogue. I just wish, James, that the articles weren’t so seasonal. Before the race it was all about how Hamilton is cracking it, now it’s how strong he is in the head. Which one is it lol?

        How about insights instead of soap operas mate? Tell us about the Honda engine progress, what really happening at Caterham, is Suzie Wolff the next great F1 PR machine – wait.. deffinitely scratchbthat last one!…

      2. Roger W says:

        James – your headline ” mentally strong” does this just refer to Sunday ? I see no evidence of this on Saturday ….

      3. aveli says:

        this is what toto wolf had to say.

        However, if Wolff still has concerns about the car’s reliability, he believes his drivers are mentally solid. Lewis Hamilton’s attitude has come under scrutiny after mistakes in qualifying at recent race weekends, but Wolff said he has no doubt that his driver is fully focused.

        “I think different to what the perception is, he is mentally very strong. One of the examples is that he had another pit stop that was not perfect on the left rear and the first thing he did was come on the radio and said ‘Don’t worry, we can make the next one better’. You can see the momentum in the team, it’s not a blaming culture in here and it’s just about trying to improve all together. He would have moved himself out of that low anyway, but winning at home and in front of such a crowd and bouncing in the way he did, that’s going to be a big boost.”

        Read more at http://en.espnf1.com/mercedes/motorsport/story/166287.html#kV6CvtKzp1KAKaXp.99

      4. James Allen says:

        Please calm it down, there are way too many posts from you at the moment. Don’t try to monopolise the conversation, thanks – Mod

      5. aezy_doc says:

        I see plenty of it on Saturday. Being disappointed does not mean that you are mentally fragile – it means you are normal, it means that you care and it means you are passionate.

      6. TimW says:

        totally agree Aezy, the guy tells the truth and clearly displays his (understandable) emotions and gets slated for it. I guess he should really learn to stop being honest about how he is feeling and start lying to interviewers when he is asked questions.

      7. Ash says:

        @ James Allen

        “monopolise the conversation”

        It’s difficult for fans when hearing information that is bias and not backed up by factual information they feel the need to comment.

        Isn’t that what we are here for James?

        Personally, I wish your journalism was a little bit more balanced with your observations….like pointing out the FACT that Rosberg is lucky to be leading the WDC;

        - Due to two DNFs in Australia & Canada for Lewis
        - Due to some lucky calls from the stewards in Canada and Monaco for Nico

        It’s funny how you journalism doesn’t cover these key factors/points James, and how they’ve had a bearing on this years championship.

      8. James Allen says:

        You have your world view, that is your prerogative

        People who know this site well know that it is balanced and doesn’t favour any driver or team.

      9. Joe flacco says:

        Ash……so you want the headline to read “momentum swings back to mentally strong Hamilton but lucky (FACT) rosberg still leads championship”

      10. Grabyrdy says:

        “They are only too aware of how much of F1 goes on in the head.”

        That’s certainly true of Lewis’s head ! And if winning when his team-mate retires makes him feel on top of the world, then it seems a bit fragile. What we’ve seen this year is that the one who’s ahead has won, so it’s by no means sure Lewis would have got Nico on Sunday. Then where would his head be ?

      11. Ben says:

        ‘if winning when his team-mate retires makes him feel on top of the world’ I have to ask have you seen or read the interviews with Hamilton after the race? He was massively disappointed to have been denied the race and beat Rosberg on track.

      12. aezy_doc says:

        What about Nico’s celebrations in Monaco after getting pole? Does that make him fragile too?

      13. Ash says:

        The celebrations by Nico after Monaco lacked so much class….the guy went down in my estimations after that.

        If you are generally sorry you don’t celebrate in that manner in my view.

    2. Truth or Lies says:

      I agree it’s not pleasant to read all this stuff and I do feel the whole Rosberg Monaco qualifying thing was done to death. However mental strength is a very important part of all performance and in F1 the difference is literally measured in tenths, so having the right mental approach is critical.

      Take Massa for example, he suffered a lot at Ferrari due to Alonsos mental attitude and self belief. In life we all experience these situations and I’m certain many professional drivers suffer anxiety, depression and self doubt in the same way regular people do. Having to deal with all of this under a spotlight is very difficult, not to mention the role of the fifth estate in making stories out of nothing.

      It’s clear even from afar that Lewis might get a bit stressed in certain situations and many of his pronouncements post Monaco were poorly judged and over emotional. It’s also clear Nico Rosberg used this to strengthen his own position and deliver a string of solid performances while Hamilton went into a tail spin.

      So the mental games are very important and whoever is the strongest mentally has the best chance of winning the championship. However emotion has a role as well and can be a very good asset if used wisely. If Hamilton can keep his cool and his head down he can still beat Rosberg, however the next GP will be a big test for both drivers, but more so for Lewis who needs to continue to regain his confidence and self belief.

  10. Stephen Taylor says:

    This championship is going to have many twists and turns rest assured before it is over. News coming
    from Ferrari saying Bianchi will drive instead of Raikkonen at the upcoming Silverstone test.

    1. glennb says:

      I heard that too. Really hope it happens for Max. Ricciardo did a test for RBR a few years back at Abu Dhabi(?) and look where that ended up.

      1. RodgerT says:

        Max? Think you got the wrong Marussia driver there. Bianchi’s first name is Jules.

      2. glennb says:

        Yep, I got it wrong. I had Max Biaggi in my head :)

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        @ glennb….wow, that must be a nasty affliction!

  11. Richard says:

    Let’s face it, what it really is is media speculation. Of course any driver will be massively disappointed when he makes a crucial mistake, and sometimes good fortune does not always go ones way. Beyond that the article starts at the wrong point because the pressure was on Hamilton when he had his first DNF in Australia, that’s what gave Rosberg the lead. The fiasco in Monaco is what started the rot, and Hamilton’s later DNF in Canada merely reinforced it. Had none of those DNF’s not happen it would have been Rosberg that was in catch up mode after Hamilton’s four maybe five straight wins. I think it’s now re-set time and I think both drivers will go into the German GP determine to score maximum points, but I suspect this will be a circuit that may push Mercedes brakes into overheat and become critical so it will be important to get pole and avoid the extra stress overtakes put on the system, unless of course Mercedes have bottomed it out properly but I doubt it. Could another cliff hanger. Roll on Hockenheim.

    1. aveli says:

      rosberg never had the momentum, hamilton always had the momentum. take away the points rosberg gained on hamilton because of car failure and hamilton would still have led the championship. this idea of momentum swinging is imagined by the media. it will take an exceptional talent to take on hamilton, the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport, and out perform him. the more people look at the truth the more they’d understand what we’re currently experiencing.

      1. Steve S says:

        “it will take an exceptional talent to take on hamilton, the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport”

        Hamilton’s biggest handicap is his absurdly unrealistic fans. He’s not even the best driver on the current grid, let alone the best driver in the history of the sport. All he did yesterday was what any half-way competent driver should have done, which was win the race in by far the fastest car after his only realistic competitor – the man in the other W05 – retired.

        “the more people look at the truth the more they’d understand what we’re currently experiencing.”

        We’re looking at too very good (but not great) drivers in the greatest car in F1 history fighting for the WDC. If we were to evaluate which of the two has driven better this season the nod would go to Rosberg, who has made fewer mistakes than his teammate and has out-qualified him.

        The effect of the W05 is to mostly cancel out the result of driver errors, and to magnify the result of mechanical failures.

      2. glennb says:

        @ Steve S
        “Hamilton’s biggest handicap is his absurdly unrealistic fans”. Although this does not apply to ‘all’ his fans, your point is well made. Being a fan is one thing, being a zealot is another. Sit back and enjoy the racing.

      3. furstyferret says:

        A bit like your man vettal, takeaway all that downforce which makes the car so easy to drive, its like its on rails, put him in a car that has loads of tourqe a leery rear end and he’s not looking that great is hebeing embarrassed by young Daniel

      4. Richard says:

        Actually the Red Bull car is the best on track, just has a poor power unit. Your man Vettel is being bested by Ricciardo which sort proves Alonso point about Vettel. Take away his RAILCAR and he turns out to be only average. Oh dear does rather upset the apple hey what!

      5. Gazza says:

        “If we were to evaluate which of the two has driven better this season the nod would go to Rosberg, who has made fewer mistakes than his teammate and has out-qualified him.”

        I know your getting upset at Dan demolishing your man Seb yet again but really you need to get your facts straight.

        Its 4-4 in qualifying even given Lewis mistakes, and its 5-3 to Lewis in race wins so the only difference is DNF,s 1-2 to Rosberg.

      6. Matt H says:

        An exceptional talent to take on Hamilton, you mean like outscoring him over 3 years like Jenson (journeyman) Button

        Hamilton is not the greatest, his return of Championships is poor given the cars he has had and he has only ever dominated one team mate in F1, Heikki Kovaleinen, Alsonso was at least equal, Jenson gave him a very good run for his money consistently and Britney is beating him this year after winning the latter half of last year.

        He is fast, he is emotional, he’s entertaining and he is a car breaker because he thinks with his right foot then his mouth……much like Our Nige….however Nige was hugely likeable.

      7. alexander supertramp says:

        Have we come to the point where people actually suggest Hamilton is not an exceptional talent? Do you have any idea how talented the current grid is? Just wow, I’m speechless.

        “He is fast, he is emotional, he’s entertaining and he is a car breaker because he thinks with his right foot then his mouth” – you sure have a very unnuanced opinion, and those tend to be the wrong ones you know, Matt. Yesterday was actually great proof of Lewis’ ability to be a ‘thinking driver’, I advice you to pay better attention while watching the races in the future.

      8. james encore says:

        Cough.
        2010. Hamilton got more points, more wins and more podiums that button
        2012 Ditto
        2011 they both scored 3 wins. But Button scored 9 other podiums and Hamilton only 3. So Button scored more points one year out of 3.

        Given the cars ? 6 years of McLarens…. A team which has ONE constructors championship to its name since 1991. A team he won 21 races in seasons which include his debut against Alonso, his championship, the year of Brawn dominance and 3 years of Adrian Newey wonder machines. Thanks to those Vettel won 26 races, he’s the only driver won more races than Hamilton over his career.
        Seriously your criticism is that he didn’t take the championship against the double diffuser Brawn, or Newey’s dominant Red Bulls ?

        He tied Alonso for points in his first year, eclipsed Kovaleinen, beat Button two years out of 3 and outscored Rosberg last year.

        A car breaker who thinks with his right foot ? The guy who uses less fuel than anyone else ? The one who has one plug lead failure and one Kers system board failure – leading to overheated brakes – against Rosberg’s broken gearbox. Rosberg finished 16 races last year, Hamilton 18. Rosberg won two races to Hamilton’s 1 but Hamilton had more podiums and more points.

        You’re free to like or dislike who you choose, but if you want to air your dislikes in public, do get you facts right.

      9. Drgraham lewis says:

        Wow bet your glad you got that off your chest.

        The stats tell a different story however.

        And if I see another ridiculous post about how button had a few points more across three yeas than Hamilton having less poles, less wins and fewer DNFs…

        For goodness sake let it lie. Button is a good racer – with nearly 100 more gps than Hamilton. Anything less than that performance and he should have been sacked!

        However – for those that keep bleating about the three year points tally… Just count the poles and wins in the same period and remember that its the accumulation across a year not several!

      10. aveli says:

        here is hamilton flying himself home in a helicopter.
        https://mobile.twitter.com/LewisHamilton/status/485368016759443456

      11. TimW says:

        Ha ha, another one who thinks a F1 season lasts three years! Clearly the (pointless) total points scored is your favourite stat of the time Lewis and Jenson spent as team mates, mine is the qualifying head to head 44 – 14 to Lewis!

      12. CHEESYPOOF says:

        You want other people to look at the truth…While declaring Hamilton the greatest ever? What a daft comment. But for logical people to exist I suppose there has to be at least one fool.

      13. aveli says:

        if you like the truth quote me accurately.

      14. Andy says:

        Are you serious? I don’t have a ‘favourite’ driver but I love the sport. Hamilton is not ‘the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport’. In the history of F1, I doubt that Hamiltion is even worthy of getting into the top ten.

      15. james encore says:

        Good though Hamilton is, I doubt many people would put his talent ahead of Ayrton Senna (or older readers might argue for Fangio, or Ascari) nor his study of the craft ahead of Alain Prost, or completeness ahead of Michael Schumacher. etc

      16. aveli says:

        i am so sorry we have a different point of view but. all those you have mentioned had rich family members or friends who paid for the driving leading up to professional racing. hamilton’s talent was spotted by his dad at the tender age of 5 while he drove a go kart on holiday, drove remote control cars beating fully grown men who’d been competing for years at the age of 6 to win championships. his dad then did all he could to get hamilton into f1.
        he is the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport. all his driving flair from karting to f3, gp2 to f1 are on youtube for your enjoyment. none of those you have mentioned drove with the same flair. if they did please point them out to me on youtube and i’ll enjoy them too.
        show me any of those guys who nearly won the championship in their rookie season whiles up against a reigning back to back double champion. he blew the whole f1 world away so much that they went as far as inventing new rules to penalise hamilton for a past offence, spa 2008. has any of those you named ever thought that was possible? I know that you can interpret data any way you want to support your argument but ask any team which driver they’d rather have in their car and they’ll tell you who. have a good look at all the f1 sites and you can see whose pictures are used. i could go on but I want to take it easy on your heart a little. i wish he could swap cars with alonso for 3 seasons just to show you how far he can lift a team. people enjoy making up stories about him simply because they find it excruciatingly painful to accept that he is that good, hoping that their stories would be believed and hamilton will stop being as good as he is. face reality, he is as good as he is, period!

      17. Ahmed says:

        Aveli, I understand most of us mere fans have favourites, but u are clearly delusional! Even the most biased F1 fans would not agree with Hamilton being “the best driver to have stepped foot in F1″,[mod]that you keep claiming.
        Fact: he is not the youngest driver to win a Championship
        Fact: driving with flair is very ambiguous. How do u know that The 60′s, 70′s and 80′s generation didn’t drive with more flair, given their much deadlier & riskier passion for the sport?? Oh sorry, YouTube, camcorders & mobile cameras weren’t around then.
        Fact: Hamilton is the only driver in recent history (maybe ever?) to have stepped into the best car on the grid in their rookie season
        Fact: When the knowledgeable people in F1 are interviewed they don’t mention Hamilton being anywhere near the best ever in F1. For someone who has had arguably (an avg) of a car in the top 3 since 2007 & has only one championship to show, and never finished 2nd in any championship except 2008, said otherwise.
        Fact: James Allen would you rate Hamilton in the top 5, scratch that, Top 10 drivers of all time???

      18. James Allen says:

        Too early to judge

        Wait to the end of his career, then judge

      19. Ahmed says:

        Aveli,
        One more Fact: any top 10 driver on the current grid would finish either 1st or 2nd in this years Championship in the 2014 Mercedes. Actually make that top 12 (inc Ham & Ros) Alonso, Vettel, Ricciardo, Bottas, Massa, Hulkenberg, Perez, grosjean, Button, Kyvat. Such is their pace advantage over the field, great job to Merc, but this years championship is a walk in the park (outside of the inter team battle)…

      20. Ash says:

        For me…..

        IF he wins the title this season….it will be two titles in two different teams.

        That’s what great drivers do….

      21. erik says:

        I respect Vettel and if anything i want him to do well.

        But whatever people think about Hamilton he makes me nervous every time he steps in the car. His performances varies a lot and he is not the most stable mind but his potential is huge and you never know what he can do that specific day.

        This widest range of possible outcomes makes him pleasure to watch but i will always hope that my preferences triumphs.

      22. erik says:

        If snails were size of a car Hamiton could jump on an make his ass to slide in the corners.

      23. kenneth chapman says:

        @ erik…..just a small question….why would you respect vettel? does multi 21 have any meaning for you? curious

      24. erik says:

        @kenneth chapman…… i don`t know you kenneth, so i don`t know your understanding of competition but actually yes, it does not mean much to me – as in fact it did not for Vettel and that is partly why i respect him. He or the team messed up there when they changed to dry tires too soon. He wasn` t afraid to go against peoples wishes.

        I like his humor and he knows who he is and doesn`t display himself like some do there.
        This is just my opinion and does not pretend to be the ultimate truth but it was very disgusting to see all the booing. Webber did this to him in Silverstone and Webber had the guts to moan when it was the other way around. So effectively poring more oil in fire but Vettel took it well.

        So. One swallow doesn`t make the summer but shows the direction and i think that all the champions has got their own Multi 21.

      25. Rockman says:

        I’ve seen Aveli post “the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport” few times now.

        [mod]
        Surely no one in their right mind would suggest Lewis as “the best driver to have stepped foot in the history of the sport”?

        He’s good but definitely not great. No one can realistically be deemed the greatest until F1 decides to close it’s door and stop racing. Only then can we look back and debate who the greatest is/was.

      26. James Allen says:

        Please moderate your tone when dealing with other posters – Mod

      27. TimW says:

        Rockman, your statement that lewis is “definitely not great” is just as silly as Aveli’s “greatest driver to set foot in the sport”. Lewis isn’t done yet, and so can’t be judged on his whole career as the drivers from previous eras can, and of course it is impossible to accurately compare two drivers who never shared a track or drove comparable cars. The truth is neither of you know if Lewis is the greatest or not, he is clearly one of the top current drivers at the moment and deserves repect for what he has achieved.

      28. Ash says:

        @ Tim W

        Well said….+1

  12. Vinola says:

    I think people confuse Lewis’s emotional lability with his mental toughness or lack thereof. Chalk and cheese if you ask me. As a fan, I find him exasperating at times- mind you, seldom do I feel that- with him in the car, even in his annus horribilis (yes, the year JB “beat” him). He never gives up in his charge; of the ex world champions, only Alonso matches him in his fortitude when that helmet goes on.
    Outside of the car, he says and does stuff that I wish he didn’t, much like my young adult kids. Ironically, I think this is best year in terms of focus outside of the car, yes, he’s made mistakes as has Rosberg, the only difference being pure luck in DNFs and being punished for the errors.
    Will he win the champsionship this year?..I think yes, but not without drama. But, that is Lewis and he’ll do it his way and justifiably so.

    1. Sidecar says:

      I agree, he is a t*t but a formidable t*t. If its got wheels and an engine he will race it faster than you. An almost Gilles flavour to Hammy. Not quite as bonkers but of the same mould.

  13. aveli says:

    rosberg still leads the championship so the momentum must still be with him. looking at how fast they both drive, I must say rosberg has either over performed his ability or his luck. may be the both because if he suffers another failure and hamilton finishes 2nd, hamilton would only be 14 points clear. on ability alone, the scoreboard doesn’t tell the true story.

  14. aveli says:

    I want to hear from f1heroes, dutch johhnie, peter wells, hp, krb, ivan, torchwood and rich c, timp, sodesu, Ian, hp, etc.

    1. Ash says:

      Looooool!!!!!

      I was thinking that……

    2. KRB says:

      Hear about what exactly?

  15. goferet says:

    Apart from Lewis’ pitstop pep talk, I think his rookie season is also further proof of his mental strength.

    Yes, here we had a rookie that was leading the championship for the majority of the season without making mistakes despite the pressure e.g. US Grand Prix 2007.

    Anyway, glad Lewis got his season back on track but I was thinking could it be that Lewis isn’t very comfortable on the supersoft tyre.

    I mean is it a coincidence that since Monaco when the supersoft was first used, then Canada & Austria, Lewis wasn’t very confident in Q3.

    Regards Rosberg, it’s not yet clear if the momentum has left his side of the garage but a worry for Rosberg must be whenever a driver’s good run ends, he usually doesn’t quite get it back within that season e.g. Lewis had 9 consecutive podiums at the beginning of the season and never managed another run like that.

    1. Gaz Boy says:

      Incredibly, that safety car and its driver – is it still Bernd Maylander? – has led more laps than Nando, Kimi, Jenson and Seb put together!
      Amazing to think last year Finger Pointer led 684 laps and this year he hasn’t even had a single lap in the lead!
      What’s that old cliche, from hero to………………mediocrity? Which kinds up sums up the year for Nando and Seb – albeit for very different reasons,.

      1. goferet says:

        @ Gaz Boy

        Oh, hadn’t thought of that.

        Yes, it’s incredible that old boy Bernd Maylander has lead more laps than the world champions >>> strange world.

        I also think Vettel needs to win a race before the summer break otherwise, it will be difficult re-winning the races he won in the second half of 2013.

      2. Gaz Boy says:

        Here’s some more very telling stats:

        Last Ferrari victory – SPAIN, May 2013 – 14 months ago (and counting)
        Last Ferrari pole – GER, July 2012 – 2 years ago
        Last Ferrari dry weather pole – SING, September 2010, 4 ish-years ago
        Last Ferrari 1-2 – GER July 2010, 4 years ago
        Last time Ferrari took pole and controlled the race from lights to flag: GER July 2012, 2 years ago
        Last time Ferrari qualified on front row: MAL 2013 – 16 months ago

        Incidentally, this is the longest win drought for Ferrari in the New Millennium – again, very telling……..

        Basically, if your name is Luca or Marco, you’re metaphorically being punched in the face every other weekend……………….
        Also Lewis has already won as many races already this year as he did for the whole of his WDC season in 2008! And there’s still 10 more to go…

      3. Gaz Bpy says:

        Fair to say that the Mercedes SLS safety car has got superior torque and straight line speed than any Renault powered chassis!
        The Finger Pointer is having a ghastly year, much like defending champions have had in the past. Mario Andretti in 1979, Jody Scheckter in 1980, Lord Nelson in 1982 and 1988, Demon Damon in 1997, Villeneuve Jnr in 1998, Michael in 2005 and even Nando in 2007 were also defending world champions who had a mare of a season for one reason or another……..add Mr Index Finger 2014 to that list!

    2. Matt H says:

      Apart from Lewis’ pitstop pep talk, I think his rookie season is also further proof of his mental strength

      You could say that, but you could argue that being a rookie there was no pressure to go out there and beat everyone as nobody expected it.

      No arguments it was a stellar first season though

      1. goferet says:

        @ Matt H

        I don’t quite agree.

        You see the whole point of being a rookie is you’re wet behind the ears and still learning the ropes so the last thing in a rookie’s mind is beating anybody let alone fighting for the championship.

      2. aveli says:

        the 2007 championship started in the pre season testing when hamilton blitzed it. ask alonso and he will tell you. the truth is all available, I don’t understand why you fail to choose it.

      3. Ash says:

        What about 2009….

        Taking that McLaren and turning it into a race winning car.

        Scoring more points in the 2nd half of the season than any other driver.

        Once again demonstrating how he works with the engineers developing a car and getting the best out of it.

        2014 for Vettel is what 2009 was for Lewis Hamilton and we’ve all seen what’s happening….

        Vettel’s STOCK is crashing rapidly….I’d say SELL, SELL, SELL….Loool!!!!

    3. Ben says:

      That’s an interesting point that you make about the Supersofts, generally the only weakness (apart from occasional reliability) that the Merc has had this year has been on the supersofts. For Monaco, Canada and Austria the other cars have been much closer on the supersoft that on the other tyres. But it hasn’t looked like Rosberg has been any quicker on them so I think it is more to do with the car being very sensitive to that tyre than a weakness for Hamilton.

  16. JOS says:

    If Nico had not had a problem, i think Lewis would have beaten him, but Nico would have gained a valuable 2nd and kept a huge lead in the WDC.
    IMHO, this will continue to be a season of Merc 1-2s with the winner decided by reliability.

    p.s. I assume one win at home isn’t the cure-all to Lewis’s mental issues/immaturity/heart-on-his-sleeve-ness. expect more Nico mindgames in the months ahead.

    1. JOS says:

      addition: …reliability or double-points season finale…

    2. kenneth chapman says:

      would it be too much to ask that this hackneyed cliche, ‘heart on sleeve’ be permanently dropped. it is a distraction to say the very least. no one wants to curtail freedom of speech but isn’t it time to move on.

      1. Joe flacco says:

        Lewis confesses….”I drove my heart out….as I always do”.

  17. DC says:

    This is all very funny – so the only difference between Hamilton ‘cracking’ and now apparently being ‘mentally strong’ is the fragility or otherwise of his team-mate’s gearbox?

    I would suggest that anyone whose mental balance is so impacted by something like that certainly isn’t mentally strong!

    1. littleredkelpie says:

      lol. +1

    2. kenneth chapman says:

      hahaha good one. excellent analysis.

    3. Kristiane says:

      The FiA should consider introducing a new sort of reason for retirement from race.

      I.e.:
      HAM – retired – mental strength failure
      RAI – retired – back still hurts

    4. TimW says:

      I think the whole “cracking” and “mental strength” thing is a media invention from start to finish. I don’t think Lewis or Nico do anything different through a race weekend just because one of them said something about the other last week or the other guy had a car failure last time but I didn’t. It is all irrelevent media hyperbole that the drivers completely ignore and get on with their jobs.

    5. Ash says:

      Looool…..

      Great Post……

  18. AlexD says:

    I do not understand how is momentum back with Ham now? He is now consistently out qualified by Rosberg and in the race there is nothing between them. In Austria Lewis made a mistake in qualifying and did not manage to overtake Nico in the race. He behaves the same way as in 2007 when he made a huge mistake in qualifying in UK. In Austria he was at least pushing. If not for the retirement of Nico, they would have finished in the same order they did in Austria. How is this Ham’s momentum? In the beginning of the year I thought that Lewis will win the title because he is a better driver, but I am changing my mind…..Rosberg is just as fast, but is more consistent and is smarter.

    1. alexander supertramp says:

      I don’t agree that Nico is just as fast. There’s not much between them, but depending on the circuit Lewis can have up to 3 tenths in qualy trim and he’s definitely faster on race day, but that’s difficult to prove if you screw up quali and end up stuck behind your team mates rear wing. I do agree that Rosberg has been more consistent, but he’s not as fast as Hamilton.

    2. Paige says:

      I don’t think Rosberg has shown he is just as fast. Hamilton has had a pace advantage in every weekend except for Bahrain, Spain, and Monaco. He has been quicker in the last three grand prix weekends, but he has screwed it all up with mistakes in Q3.

      What Rosberg is shown is that he is something of a modern day Niki Lauda. He is fast, very fast, but not the fastest. But he is willing to simply chomp away, never lose focus, and work as hard as possible to gain any advantage over Lewis that he can. He’ll study Lewis’ telemetry in every session to figure out what Lewis is doing in terms of inputs and braking points to figure out how to go quicker. He’ll learn everything possible about the car and focus as hard as possible on perfecting the setup. Working hard pays off in terms of pace and results, and it’s also well known that a lot of Sebastian Vettel’s performance advantage in recent years is due to his hard work outside of driving the car.

      In the end, you have two totally top quality drivers. One of them (Lewis) is faster, but the other one can beat him. Just because a driver is more talented doesn’t mean he will always win. Pace and success in Formula One is about vastly more variables aside from just natural ability, and Nico seems to have probably the best understanding of this of any driver in Formula One. And to his credit.

      1. TimW says:

        Hmailton was quicker in Monaco in p1, p2, p3 and q2.

    3. Ash says:

      “Rosberg is just as fast, but is more consistent and is smarter”

      Looool – OK!!!

  19. Nick Hipkin says:

    James,

    Slightly off topic but being the first time I heard these new cars in person I noticed the Toro Rosso’s were noticeably louder than the other cars, any ideas why? If only they could get all the cars to sound like that the noise problem would be solved!

    Otherwise the new cars were enjoyable to watch, great racing and refreshing to see drivers having to work the wheel again. The Ferrari and Renault engined cars sound nice, just need to be louder.

    I see it’s up to the teams now to resolve the noise issue, a few tweaks and it will be good but from a fans point of view this does still need to be addressed

    1. James Allen says:

      Not really

      All teams make their own exhausts, but use customer power units, like the Renault used by Toro Rosso

      1. Nick Hipkin says:

        Hopefully a standard exhaust can be implemented next year for all teams that could be used, I hope the teams don’t neglect this issue as it’s still important to the fans

      2. Aussie Guy says:

        If they removed or redesigned the ERS-H and instead used external wastegates to control boost, the engines would be much louder when ‘on boost’. Also by doing this the Mercedes ‘dinner plate’ sized compressor (its probably got a rather large exhaust wheel too) on their turbo, which offers huge torque & top end power, would be balanced out as without the ERS-H to spin up the turbo the lag would be atrocious and the other smaller turbo engines would suffer far less in overall lap performance as a result.

        I would bet 99% of the performance difference we see this year is turbo sizing related. Shame Renault & Ferrari missed the boat. On paper Ferrari have potentially the best engine setup (water to air intercooler = tiny inlet tract = least lag = less ERS-H dependence to spin up turbo) and appear to be ok weight wise to carry the extra water & radiator that this entails but they have the wrong sized turbo unfortunately so thats it for this year…damn those engine development restrictions.

      3. goonerf1 says:

        Aussie Guy

        Nice to read a tech minded response :).

        To alleviate the turbo lag they could mount the propellor/turbine/whatever you want to call it part of the turbocharger in its own casing, suck the air inside out thereby creating a vacuum, and then just use a tiny amount of electrical power to get it rotating. This would remove turbo lag due to little air resistance.

        Completely spot on with the engine homologation rules aswell. These are completely silly. Let Renault, Ferrari and Mercedes develop these engines as much as they can, or at least up to a limit of BHP and MJ, and then impose the restrictions. At least then on the engine front, everyone is starting from the same spot.

      4. Thompson says:

        @.Nick hipkin, No it’s not….

        Watch old televised races this noise that everyone talks of is a myth.

        A few seasons ago the BBC did an outstanding job with sound, great detail, you could hear cars going over curbs, bottoming out etc from the in car and all sorts.

        You can just about pick up such details now with squealing tires so much better than those whining v8′s.

        But it’s the racing which has improved 10 fold making the show.

      5. Drgraham lewis says:

        Aussie – actually the ERS-H is probably the only area of technology worth anything in road car terms as well as being the one area unrestricted. The remainder of the technology is pretty old hat and been around in lesser power outputs for years. That area of technology is almost certainly the one factor paying dividends for Mercedes across the board in that its power and fuel saving is not constrained by the fuel flow.

        Any turbo ‘size’ most certainly is and even if there were not restrictions, the fuel flow and quantity would make your assumed dinner plate turbo pointless.

        By the way – the turbo sizes all have regulated sizes, component types, materials etc along with very strict guidelines on what can and cannot be done. You should take a look. Its certainly enough to ensure that ‘size’ is most certainly not a factor here.

        Given Renault pushed for these changes, have many years of experience in such engine types along with an equal date start to Ferrari and Mercedes, they really have only their own arrogance or assumptions to blame.

        By the way – it’s not all the engine – there are a number of other cars on the grid using the same power unit…

  20. Karima Ali says:

    I dont think Hamilton is mentally strong at all. Its quite clear that he is more naturally gifted and quicker than Rosberg, but Rosberg has the German mental strength and his calm approach is paying dividends for him. No one knows who Rosberg is dating, who he went to dinner with, who made him feel better, which aircraft he took his dogs on a trip on etc etc – all these things that Hamilton announces to the world make him look like a kid who just wants to be a movie star and lucked into a lot of money so he is trying to show it off. Hamilton should take a leaf out of Rosberg’s book, keep his private life low-key and to himself and use his speed to become a great champion on the track. If he continues to ride this emotional roller-coaster nonsense tabloid lifestyle, I dont think he will ever achieve the greatness that he is capable off.

    1. Joe Creti says:

      Agreed. This pussy-cat lifestyle he has adopted has totally messed up his head for a number of years. So much so, even Button beat him in points at Mclaren. Things have to be really toast in Hamilton’s head for him to be beaten by Button, who is considered to be a few tenths of the ‘great-driver;s’ pace. I have a feeling Rosberg will win the title this year – something tells me Lewis is one mistake away from losing it altogether. Then the sulking look will reappear, the blame game will begin and it will be deja vu again!

      1. aveli says:

        if anyone wants to find out about rosberg’s lifestyle, they can. it’s all available, his girlfriend, his hobbies etc.

        https://m.youtube.com/results?q=nico%20rosberg&sm=1

    2. aveli says:

      how is all this mental strength measured? have a good look at the results and remove those due to car failure and you will notice that hamilton has scored more points so far this season. why is it that no other drivers’ mental strength is talked about except hamilton’s? is it because those who talk about mental strength are looking for faults? if so why are they so keen to find faults? is it due their base pairs out of sequence?

      1. ReviLO says:

        “why is it that no other drivers’ mental strength is talked about except hamilton’s? Is it because those who talk about mental strength are looking for faults?” That is interesting isn’t it!!!! I don’t recall reading about how Nico had “mentally cracked” after losing four times on the bounce, I do wonder why that is? An agenda maybe?

      2. aveli says:

        rosberg is hamilton’s teammate so commentary on his performance is directly related to that of hamilton’s.

    3. Thompson says:

      There is a reason for that……

      Hamilton is the show, no one cares about Rosberg or about anything he does…….

      Has there been a thread generated on this site regards Rosberg yet?

      Let alone 3 in a row generating over 100 or so replies….?

      Hopefully he won’t become a super villain in this soap opera now that things have been reset.

  21. Shri says:

    There will be swings and both drivers have made mistakes this year.

    However, I look as below:
    - Take the 3 DNF’s out for each MERC drivers. 6 races head to head Hamilton has 4 and Rosberg has only 2.
    - Hamilton has 2 DNF while Rosberg has 1 DNF and second partial problem but got 18 points. Hamilton has slightly poorer luck.
    - Nico is just 4 point ahead which is nothing considering MERC’s advantage this season.

    2 drivers have to keep their head down & work hard and hope there is no further DNFs.

  22. Paige says:

    It’s way too early to say this, but the mistake in qualifying by Lewis could serve be a moment analogous to Senna’s crash in the dying laps of Monaco while leading by more than half a minute in 1988.

    Senna was humiliated by this mistake, as we all know, and was very emotional about it. He then recovered, won 6 of the next 8 races in a span in which Prost couldn’t touch him on pace, and then beat him for the title. Senna always goes back to the crash at Monaco as the turning point for him and credits it for helping him get stronger mentally.

    Lewis really came back on Sunday maybe his most determined, focused drive in his career. He was 2-3 tenths quicker than Rosberg after about the first 6 laps of the first run (the first six laps of which, Nico was able to respond), and you don’t maintain that kind of pace for 2/3 of a run without being in a very focused rythm. I think, as he said, this was a real wakeup moment for him. And he is traditionally very quick on the tracks that are coming up in the next four races (Hockenheim, Hungary, Spa, Monza). This could be the beginning of a real tear for him. Rosberg better be on his A-game, or he could be put on a real back foot very quickly.

  23. RichB says:

    I don’t think he mentally cracked in qually at Silverstone, he just thought it was too wet to improve

    1. C63 says:

      +1
      Poor judgement – for sure.
      Daft not to continue the lap – definitely.
      Mentally cracking – no way.
      Hindsight is a wonderful thing……

      1. ReviLO says:

        Why is it that the “media” arrive at a completely different conclusion to that which should be arrived at following very simple steps? Usually in the instances where Hamilton is involved. Odd that!!

      2. Ash says:

        Looool!!!!

        Yeah…very odd….but I have my suspicions…..

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        @C63 hahaha…..arrogance, he thought that he had it in the bag!!!

      4. C63 says:

        @KC
        I think that’s a bit harsh. Hamilton was a bit daft not to finish the lap but I don’t think he was arrogant – he simply concluded he had pole and the chances of improving his lap time did not exist, so he pulled in.
        But if he was arrogant, then we must conclude Ricky was as well – he didn’t even bother leaving the pits , presumably assuming that Seb was wasting his time. You might say it was Red Bulls decision for Ricky to stay put and perhaps it was. But if that were the case then surely Hamiltons error of judgement is even easier to forgive. RBR are a team who are very good at thinking on their feet and yet their combined strategy team and their #1 driver didn’t think it was worth another run!
        Hindsight makes everyone an expert, but these sort of conditions can make fools of some very clever people.

      5. kenneth chapman says:

        @ C63 …i think that you nailed it. it was RB pit wall that took the decision not to send ricci out again. wise? in hindsight, probably not and the RB pit wall have already acknowedged that fact. the difference however is that hamilton took that decision on his ‘tod malone’ arrogantly believing that he had it ‘in the bag’.

        keep in mind that my original post was not meant to be offensive and was partially TIC. obviously my communication skills are sadly lacking!!!! mia culpa.

  24. Thompson says:

    Lol…. is this spam!

    honestly talking about the mental state of these guys is crazy – they drive super go carts at over 200mph for a living, like boxers, moto gp ridrs etc these guys are not all there many unstable. Which is why so many fall once their careers are over.

    sooner or later though sanity will hit them and the risks out weigh outside commitments. Lets enjoy them while we can shall we.

    mentally strong…. I swear….. need a pair of role eyes.

    1. JakobusVdL says:

      I’m not sure what “role eyes” are, but otherwise think you’re right Thompson.
      We’re watching a bunch of narrowly focused super ego’s at work, its wrong to take anything they say or do too seriously or out of its motorsport context.

      but enough about The JA on F1 followers…..

      1. Steve Mc says:

        By far the best comment of the thread, Jakobus!

    2. Hudson says:

      I think you got it wrong here Thompson mate. Can you tell us which F1 drivers have fallen over. I know in other sports it’s common, but F1 drivers tend to do rather well even in after life.

      1. Thompson says:

        James hunt was one…. Drank and smoked himself to death.

        Some have died young or injured themselves persuing an adrenalin rush.

        Many thankfully are from privilege backgrounds so have no financial issues. But you also have manywho have had short carriers suffering aswell.

  25. Obster says:

    Congrats to Lewis, but let’s not have things get out of hand. His main competition retired with a mechanical problem. He then cruised to the win.
    You want a “great race”? See 1987 where the British driver was delayed with a wheel problem, then came back to win in amazing style.

  26. George says:

    Well after reading ” …I guess they’re on a pretty equal level this season and it’s going to last until the last race of the season.” what do we do if one or the other lucks the championship just because they happen to win the double pointer finale? The ridiculousness of this situation and almost sadistic manipulation of the championship (anyone seen the film ‘Hunger Games’) for crude excitement is just pathetic, we spend the whole year watching these guys slug it out only to have the whole thing stabbed in the back by BEs showmanship in the last frame… this is not what gets me up at 1am in New Zealand every 2 weeks.

    James, please, we need a poll (as if it were necessary), just to let the sport know this is not ok and will screw us around too much – if the sport is asking questions of its self, here is one answer.

  27. mcwillberby says:

    Well done Lewis, back to where you belong :-) This will help your WDC campaign in 2014.
    Go on.
    I like the new version or layout of this James Allen website.
    But about the ‘white background’ is really hurting my eyes, anyone else feels the same way?

  28. mcwillberby says:

    +2 What does ‘mentally strong/weak’ means? What does it have to do with ‘racing’ nowadays?
    I don’t understand, sounds offensive to me; these guys are driving at high speed and while managing multiple buttons and listening/talking to their engineers on the radio…
    So is having a set back now considered a defect?

  29. ferggsa says:

    Regardless of MBs drivers’ mental status, with this year’s format we are 9 races down with only 4 points apart (out of 326), 9 races to go with a reasonable probability of having a similar outcome, and then the season’s end double header, it will be fun to watch

    Maybe Bernie consults a crystal ball when coming up with his dumb, unpopular ideas

  30. John says:

    Hamilton mentally strong, year right. A mentally strong driver just gets on with it, not sook about it.

  31. German Samurai says:

    People read too much into this because these two guys are fighting over 1 and 2.

    Imagine they are fighting over 5 and 6. You would shrug your shoulders and say another underwhelming performance by Hamilton against his journeyman teammate. Bottled it again in qualifying and was behind Rosberg when Rosberg went out of the race.

    Barely got the better of Button between 2010 and 2012 and has barely got the better of Rosberg from 2013-14. This championship has been handed to Hamilton on a platter. He has the most dominant car of all time and all he has to do is beat Rosberg who has never really distinguished himself. A 43 year old Schumacher was quicker than Rosberg in 2012.

    1. aveli says:

      so why are you not talking about this who are actually fighting over 5th and 6th this season?

    2. Joe flacco says:

      If rosberg wins it will continue the tradition of Germans winning titles in cars that have a ridiculous advantage……if Hamilton gets some more failures then we can assume that the proud tradition of German drivers winning world titles due to recieving priority treatment over their teammate.

  32. Flawless says:

    A question to the learned… Which other driver (past or present) has won atleast one race in every season that he has competed in? Amongst all th drivers that are currently racing I think it is only vettel? For the moment anyways

    1. C63 says:

      I haven’t looked up any stat’s but I would happily bet that Hamilton has won at least one race in every season he has competed in F1.
      As for Vettel, I agree with you – that stat’ is in serious danger of ending. :-)

    2. Hudson says:

      It’s actually Hamilton. Vettel did two years with Torro Roso, but only won once. Hamilton has always won a grand prix every year, and last year was his worst when he won only once.

  33. Flawless says:

    With regard to 2014′s catch phrase, kimi must be of very weak ‘mental state’ as he has been consistently beaten by nando this season… Where’s all the “kimi is faster than you” posts? 9 races in and he quite simply does not pose any threat against nando. Even f1′s “mentally weakest, lead footed” driver, lewis hamilton (ahem) has never faced such a slump in performance in comparison to his team mate.

  34. Ric Zito says:

    The important thing to note here, far more than all the tabloid-level amateur psychology nonsense that the F1 press generates, is that Lewis was lucky. Not lucky to win – he may well have been able to do that anyway. But lucky that Nico didn’t finish second. Because had he done so, he’d still be 22 points ahead in the WDC. So, good for Lewis, he had a great stroke of luck. Sorry for Nico, he did extremely well up to that point in the weekend – at least as well as Lewis.

    I don’t want to get into the mental strength/hunger to win debate. Unlike the F1 press and the chattering classes I don’t feel qualified to talk about it.

    1. Thompson says:

      I agree.

      Hamilton needed this result has it is.

      While I do understand the bravado to the press and during the podium interview I was genuinely surprised we never got a ‘woo hooo! ‘ from Hamilton when he drove past Rosbergs stricken Merc then got the radio message to confirm he was out.

      I would have done a donut on the main straight on the same lap – he had enough time.

      1. aveli says:

        and then breakdown soon after the doughnut.

  35. Grant says:

    The gloves are off!

    May the real WDC please stand up!….

  36. Kieran Donnelly says:

    Double-points, double-points, double-points,
    Double-points, double-points, double-poiiiii-nts,
    Double-points, double-points, double-points,
    Double-points, doouuu-ble points!

    While I do think Lewis is probably the more consistently faster driver overall, regardless of the way the chips fall between now and then, the double-points of the last race really leave everything wide open. Whether the fans (Nico’s, Lewis’ or neutrals) really accept a champion who is only that by virtue of the double points is open to question – I guess it doesn’t matter. That winner will go down in the records as the champions in any case.

    1. aveli says:

      we’ll see.

  37. Chris says:

    I cringed at all the prost/senna comparisons of Lewis/Niko. But Niko is so like Alain Prost, intelligent and consistent, always there to capitalise on errors. Anyone agree? I think he would have won on Sunday to without his issue.

    Having said thta, being British, I am happy to see Lewis right back there!!

    1. Thompson says:

      I cringe when people talk about Rosbergs intelligents……

      We’re does that even come from?

      I have already rated him a 10 for this season so far for delivering the results he has but struggle to see how his intelligents can be judged.

      Is a driver not a doctor…….

      If fossil fuel ran our tomorrow how useful would his intelligence be.

      Genuinely trying not to get into this backwards and forwards debate ref these guys mindset but some of the posts being generated.

      We need to turn this amateur psychology stuff on our selves methinks.

    2. Mike from Medellin says:

      Prost was actually fast and was a standout driver for many years. To compare either Rosberg with him in an insult.

      The only comparison that I can think of is help from the FIA. Prost with Balestre and Nico with the Derek Warwick and Derek Daly. That’s where the similarities end.

  38. Henri says:

    It’s funny how Lewis’ 2nd pitstop was faster (by approx 1 second I think?? – maybe someone can clarify that) when the mechanics were likely taking their time as Lewis >40 secs over Bottas. IMO they should probably take their time over all of his pitstops…

    1. aveli says:

      i think the first one was so slow because hamilton had done 24 laps on a clockwise circuit so the left rear was stuck more than it normally does and slowed them down a bit.

  39. Sergio says:

    F1 is for “smart” people: after 2 or 3 consecutive mistakes demostrating how voluble the Britton can be, now is time for the “high revs.” after ROS mechanical failure. ” C’mon Lewis you were faster than your team mate, and you even would be the Winner at home GP without ROS problems”. OMG I miss that kind of “illnes” of non realism in my country. Repeat with me: HAM is better than ROS, HAM is better than ROS; HAM is better than ROS. HAM right now is focused, strong & calmed driver and ROS had well to be afraid of him, HAM right now is focused, strong & calmed driver and ROS had well to be afraid of him, HAM right now is focused, strong & calmed driver and ROS had well to be afraid of him. If a “normal” or a non English Champion driver needs 1 or 2 mistakes to be the evil centre of the earth for some Anglo Media, HAM needs maybe 1000. Everything has sense, since the first day he put his feet in this sport, the “Shumacher succesor” need to be pushed to the max as a great product he is. Maybe he is not what their media say, but he sells & he sells really well.

    1. Thompson says:

      Wow Sergio….. Just wow..lol

      To add unlike Schumacher, Alonso – maybe Vettel too, but judging by his luck this year RB can’t build 2 fast cars at once – Hamilton has never had the luxury of no.1 status in a team.

      That’s important.

      1. aveli says:

        hamilton specifically doesn’t want number status.

  40. michael grig says:

    talking mental strength i see on 1 to 5 scale Rosberg has 5 Lewis has 3.
    IMO

  41. aveli says:

    tom clarkson is confused. just before the restart he stopped the commentary just to say how he felt sorry for kvyat because he spent a lot of time studying he clean side of the grid slot only to be ruined by the changes in position for the restart, like the cars would start back on the slots. cringe cringe cringe.

  42. Torchwood Five says:

    We will all apply our own ideas of momentum.

    After Australia, Hamilton’s run of four wins were considered his momentum because he eventually reeled Rosberg back in, but the momentum was also with Nico as he remained in the lead in the points for most of that run.

    So now, Nico has momentum as he is still leading, and Lewis has momentum because he now is only four points adrift of his team-mate.

  43. sunny stivala says:

    “mentally strong Lulu?” that’s some saying that can only be expected fro on this site.
    This post will most probably not be allowed to stand!.

  44. KRB says:

    He beat him in an unfair fight, in Bahrain!

  45. michael grig says:

    ‘mentally strong’ ?!?!
    JH with his talent LH should be aeons ahead in the standings
    but he is not
    the last you should start the art. is mentally strong.
    just MO

LEAVE A COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Top Tags
SEARCH News
JA ON F1 In association with...
Download the chequered flag podcast today
Download the chequered flag podcast today
MTS
Industry-Leading Testing and Sensing Solutions
Multi award winning Formula One photographer
Multi award winning Formula One photographer