Why a team introduces a different chassis for a driver
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Posted By: James Allen  |  08 May 2014   |  6:11 pm GMT  |  143 comments

Sebastian Vettel played down the significance of his new chassis here in Spain, pointing out that it isn’t brand new – it was used for pre-season testing – but it’s new to him this season replacing one that he said, “Isn’t talking to me.”

Vettel has struggled this season, twice being asked to move over to let his team mate Daniel Ricciardo through during races.

So what goes on behind the scenes with these chassis and why does a team introduce a new one for a driver in a situation like this?


JA on F1 technical adviser Mark Gillan offers this insight:

“Typically a team makes 4 to 5 chassis a year and sometimes the better funded teams will make 6. The lead time to manufacture a new chassis from scratch is between 60 to 90 days. With modern manufacturing techniques and testing process there is very little between each chassis in terms of mass and stiffness, assuming that they are made to the same design.

“Going to Australia the teams will have 3 chassis made and should have run at least two on track. These two tend to be the race chassis. One may chose to adopt a new chassis for the first race but this is not necessarily the norm and depends what has happened to the other two chassis.

“For instance if there have been incidents in the FIA crash tests or on track which has necessitated modifications and/or local repairs to the first two chassis which add mass and can compromise stiffness one may chose to use chassis no 3 and put no 1 or 2 in the box as a spare tub. Moreover newer chassis may have updates to reduce mass etc which is clearly beneficial, especially this season when everyone is pushing hard to reduce mass as much as possible.

“Some drivers also tends to get ‘attached’, in an almost superstitious manner, to their particular chassis, especially if things are going well, although the opposite is true too. When performances are not as expected then doubts can arise over the chassis, although these are usually unfounded.

“The positive aspect of moving to a new chassis is that it removes uncertainty (the last thing that you want is the driver believing that there may be an issue with their chassis) and the driver will also benefit from any improvements that can be included in the design to reduce mass, whilst not compromising on safety.”


As for Vettel’s explanation of why he changed chassis and what he is looking for from the change, here is what he said in the FIA press conference this afternoon in Barcelona, admitting that he has been struggling with the car’s rear end stability issues and cannot feel the car as he wishes to,

“We all have our own style to how we like to drive the car, how to set up the car. I think in general I don’t mind when the rear’s moving so I don’t mind suffering or having oversteer in the car. But if it is too much obviously if it starts to bother you when the car slides too much, then you find yourself correcting more than actually being able to push or get the maximum out of the car. And, yeah, it slows you down. I think that has been part of the problem so far.

“We concluded after China, where we were quite a little bit behind, to change the chassis, so actually it’s not a new chassis, it’s an old one that we used in testing in the winter, and we have some experience with it.

“It’s more a sanity check rather than a real problem with the other chassis. So it’s just to try everything we can and basically reset and start again. Obviously there is still a lot of work ahead of us, as I mentioned after the first couple of races, maybe I’m not as happy as I want to be but it’s a long process, a lot of things have changed and I think we need to be patient.”

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143 Comments
  1. Gaz Boy says:

    Haven’t teams always built at least 3 or 4 chassis per season in modern F1?
    Common sense really.
    If a car gets badly shunted at Barcelona, but is repairable after a couple of weeks, then it makes sense to bring out the spare chassis to Monaco!
    Also, I would imagine, although this is very, very subjective, that a brand new chassis would be stiffer and more rigid. than one that done a few races hard graft, but I stand to be corrected.
    If I remember correctly, I think back in 2010 Sebastian complained that his chassis didn’t “feel” right at Spain and Monaco, and so Red Bull brought a new car for him for the summer season that year.
    Interestingly, I’ve just looked at last year’s Autocourse annual and it turns out Sebastian used the same chassis – RB9-03 – all season long! Mark alternated between RB9-02 and RB9-04, so for Sebastian to change cars early in the season is something of a sign that he may feel – feel being the key word – that the chassis lacks rigidity.

    1. Gaz Boy says:

      PS This is a bit off topic, I’ve just posted this to Random 79 on the previous debate, but it turns out only Australia gets all the races live for free in the English speaking world – that’s a huge chunk of the Anglosphere and its potential customer base for F1 (and the manufacturers) neglected?
      It’s even worse for our friends in continental Europe though – France, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Austria, Republic of Ireland, Latvia, Poland, Romania all have to part with their hard earned cash to watch live F1 races, or F1 at all actually. Believe it or not, Finland gets free F1 coverage, but with delayed or highlights show (pay channel MTV3 shows live coverage there), so the Finnish fans also have to part with their cash if they want to see their national hero Mr Bottas live.
      Germany, Hungary and Spain get free coverage understandably – as does Switzerland curiously (could be because some drivers live there???) – but otherwise you pays yer money, you takes yer choice when it comes to F1 coverage in continental Europe. Mr E and FOM are obviously milking the European TV viewers for all their worth………….
      Again, like the English speaking world, isn’t the lack of free to air F1 coverage in the European continent – the heartland of F1 – a bit of an own goal? Like the Anglosphere, why is F1 being somewhat neglected in its primal heartland?
      All the information I posted was retrieved via Wikipedia, if I am wrong, or anyone else knows different, I stand to be corrected.

      1. Rob Pullar says:

        We have to pay for all TV coverage in Portugal as well.

      2. I thought Kimi was the national hero of Finland, and beyond!

        In Australia, coverage is free for now. It includes 6 commercial breaks during the race and features a couple of reports from James Allen or sometimes Tom Clarkson.

        The Ten network isn’t in a great financial shape and this may not last for long. The V8 Supercars are switching to pay TV next year, so there’s a worry F1 might be next.

      3. Gaz Boy says:

        RE Damien: If Kimi keeps performing poorly I suspect his Ferrari future looks bleak!

      4. Martin says:

        Hi Damien,

        In I think the China telecast Greg Rust said the V8s were coming back to 10. I believe Australia still has a legislated list of events that must be on free-to-air TV and F1 is one of them. The pay TV deal could be like the football codes with a minimum amount (all races) on “FreeView” and qualifying etc on pay.

      5. Lindsay says:

        Ten appears to have dropped MotoGP qualifying this year too.

        The V8 Supercars coverage is not “switching to pay TV” next year. While it is true that complete coverage of the season in HD is available on pay TV only, six “major” races will still be shown live on FTA. Incidentally, the FTA coverage is returning to Ten.

      6. Distant Knight says:

        Yes, us Aussies get the races live, but they are definitely not free…. they cost me a lot of sleep!

      7. Alec Tronnick says:

        Well you and Gaz Boy should move to Perth, the Euro races are on at a respectable 8:30pm on Sunday night.
        The problem is the races in North & South America are on at 1:30am
        Come on down… Blue sky and plenty of work

      8. Luke says:

        Shhhh Gaz Boy! Don’t let the cat out of the bag. We very much like the arrangement Down Under and we’d prefer it stayed that way! We can also get live internet streaming of every race too..but now we are just bragging.

      9. Adrian Newey Jnr says:

        What about the other Finnish hero?

      10. Gaz Boy says:

        Kimi has been somewhat underwhelming, to put it mildly, but its a long season, let’s see how he goes now F1 is back in Europe.

      11. Bleifuss says:

        It’s free in Canada too.

      12. Allan B says:

        So you get TSN HD or RDS HD (French) for free? Prey tell me how you do that?

      13. Mr Ed says:

        I know other’s disagree but speaking for myself, I’d prefer ad-free on pay TV rather thsn the current free to air arrangements with ads and other ‘local content’. e.g. the free to air coverage does not include the pre race show, gridwalk etc.

      14. Sean Rogers says:

        Fully agree mate!

      15. TheLollipopMan says:

        Well don’t come to Asia then because, even though we pay a fortune for the F1 coverage on Fox Sports and Star Sports (like Sky, both owned by Murdoch, and the latter is not even in HD!), each race is festooned with advertisements. It’s an infuriating outrage. I’m considering joining the many people here who are ditching their pay TV services to instead pay to watch the races direct from the F1 website – ad free!

      16. F1.6T says:

        Why is it ‘understandable’ that Germany, Hungary and Spain get free coverage? Please explain, thanks.

      17. Gaz Boy says:

        Germany and Spain I would imagine get free coverage because of Fernando and Sebastian: huge national interest in those two aforementioned drivers – if Fernando wins this weekend – big if! – just watch the reaction from his adoring public (and media).
        Hungary was an error, I should have deleted that out.

      18. Purple Helmet says:

        Sorry, but it has nothing to do with how well or how popular the drivers are. It’s to do with how much broadcasters are prepared to bid for the rights. Britain has some rather handy drivers too, and F1 is perhaps more popular in the UK than anywhere.

        I think F1 is cyclical. I recall as a kid in the 80s, the coverage was very poor and you might get highlights in the evening for 20 minutes. Consequently the sport had a much lower profile. ITV got the rights, and then made the most of it with live coverage of all practice, qualifying and races, albeit with adverts. It is this which drove F1 to be hugely popular in the UK.

        Now that it’s so popular, it’s a juicy target for pay TV. The problem is, the longer it disappears into pay TV, the lower the general public profile becomes, as only the real enthusiasts follow it. Advertisers get less exposure on the cars, fewer people are interested and pay TV interest wanes. And then it becomes a potential target for free to air again.

      19. auski says:

        yes in Australia its live but a 10pm start time for any race in Europe. 3.30am for any American time zone

      20. monsterFG says:

        True that mate, in Australia we get Moto GP on free to air as well as V8 supercars (local touring car championship but as of next year only 6 biggest races will bve live)

      21. Miha Bevc says:

        I’m from Slovenia and it’s free. But the coverage is so lousy that I usually turn off the sound and listen to BBC radio coverage via F1 app on my iPhone

      22. Dave Emberton says:

        Bernie’s made most of his fortune from TV rights, so he’s hardly going to start giving it away now.

        Which either means “free” with adverts in the races, “free” paid out of tax as was the case in the UK, or subscription.

        Actually Sky haven’t charged me a single extra penny to get F1, so you could say its free in the UK too.

      23. Not Free says:

        Hi, that is far from free – you’re paying a subscription already that means you’re paying £40 a month to get F1 for ‘free’.

        For the rest of the UK it isn’t free at all, limited highlights on the BBC and the occasional live race.

      24. Old dry joint says:

        On a trip to the US a year ago I wanted to catch one of the races on SpeedTV. A pay tv channel… After finally finding the channel number amongst 300 odd channels, I was astounded by the number of ads in the coverage and poor commentating.

        Thanks Ten and BBC…. and of course Alan Jones who got me watching F1 late on Sunday nights… Sometimes through “snowy” reception from the Sydney stations in the early 80′s….

        If it ever goes to Fox in Oz it will lose so much exposure and it’s popularity will take a massive hit.

    2. Martin says:

      From memory, composite material structures such as F1 tubs tend to retain their rigidity much more than metal structures as they age. Metal ones tend to be more elastic in general and over time they develop play – the metal is slowly being cold worked.

      Composites tend to fail through fatigue – repeated back and forth movements. At that point you get a complete failure (crack) in an area. Without that damage the rigidity doesn’t really change, so it is possible to go through an entire season without losing performance from the tub.

      There can be issues with tolerances in the chassis, especially left to right, where the suspension mounting points are too different from each other.

  2. Richard says:

    You should write a book for people like me: “F1 technology for dummies”. I’d buy it instantly.

    1. There’s one published already written by Jon Noble and Mark Hughes. It ages rather quickly mind you, so yeah, it might be time for a second edition.

  3. clyde says:

    Hmmm first Red bull said his chassis was suspected of having a crack hence the change. Then they said that it was pre planned in March to change his chassis after the first four races ….. And now Vettel says “We concluded after China, where we were quite a little bit behind, to change the chassis, actually it’s not a new chassis, it’s an old one that we used in testing in the winter, and we have some experience with it.
    It all smells fishy

    I wonder which one is the correct story :-)

    1. aveli says:

      all that matters are the results which the fishiness of the story cannot change.

      1. clyde says:

        So far the results are pretty obvious ….Lets see what he does in his uprated/new chassis

      2. aveli says:

        i think it’s best to wait until the end of the season to decide whether ricciardo has out driven vettel or not. as it stands now vettel leads him on the points table albeit he has out driven vettel in the last 2 races at least.

    2. Purple Helmet says:

      I think teams are well prepared to protect their drivers by making excuses for them if it takes a little pressure of them.

  4. Goob says:

    This is going to be so funny… Vettel is no Hamilton, and he will fail just as miserably in the new chassis.

    Vettel is a free rider… Newey’s WDCs required a passenger with little to no talent…

    Get ready to laugh guys/gals…

    1. Lindsay says:

      Correct. Hamilton has not won four WDCs.

      But how exactly is the current Mercedes car any different in its dominance than Newey’s best?

      You need a car capable of winning the WDC before you can win the WDC.

      1. aveli says:

        i can’t see the word hamilton in goob’s post above lindsay.

      2. Lindsay says:

        aveli: I can!

      3. Purple Helmet says:

        I suppose the difference is that Hamilton at present seems to be blowing away his team mate, while Vettel is looking distinctly average against new boy Ricciardo.

    2. Tristan says:

      Vettel is no Hamilton? C’mon, really? The start to this year aside, Ham’s last five years are not much to be proud of.

      I’d take 4x WDC in my team any day of the week over Ham.

      1. aveli says:

        you may not be proud of them but he is proud of them.

      2. Purple Helmet says:

        HAM is the highest paid driver, I suspect there is a very good reason for that.

      3. justafan says:

        I thought it’s Alonso?

      4. Tristan says:

        There is a good reason for that – marketability.

        And HAM is a very good driver, no question. But IMO SV is exceptional, albeit not always likable, and gets too much discredit by people simply saying his success is down to Newey alone. I don’t think so.

        Also, yes I though Alonso was the highest paid driver. Happy to be corrected.

    3. r says:

      You are on the wrong site.

      1. Jake says:

        I will take Hamiltons last five years any time!

    4. JF says:

      True– Vettel is no Hamilton. By the same metric: Einstein is no Pam Anderson.

      1. Jock Ulah says:

        A voice of reason in the wilderness . . . thanks!

      2. JF says:

        I do have utmost respect for both of these drivers, my comment was meant to be funny rather than mean!

    5. Hello says:

      Yes, that’s how Damon Hill won his championship.

    6. grat says:

      While I agree Vettel isn’t up to Hamilton’s caliber at passing (ask Jenson Button or Mark Webber), he’s a very fast driver, with a good car, and a good team.

      Vettel (and Red Bull and Newey’s design team) earned at least two of those championships, and lucked into the other two because Ferrari (2009) and McLaren (2012) weren’t up to the task of beating Red Bull.

      It wasn’t just the car, or just the driver, or just the team– all three have combined to dominate F1 for the last 4 years, and now Mercedes has finally gotten all their pieces in place to be able to compete.

      .. although they may have overcompensated. ;)

  5. ian says:

    The same thing happened in 2010 – after Monaco I think. He was getting beaten by webber a bit too often then too.

  6. Mick Nicholson says:

    Does Seb give the new chassis a new name?

    1. Mick Nicholson says:

      Ah just watched the press conference – it (she?) gets the same name.

      1. oddball says:

        After practice 1 i think he is calling her Joan as she gets a tad hot on startup:)

  7. alexbookoo says:

    So taking the comments of Red Bull’s Chief Designer Rob Marshall and Red Bull’s Chief Driver Sebastian Vettel together, the use of this brand new, old chassis is just a routine, scheduled sanity check?

    Rob Marshall: “Sebastian will get a new chassis for Barcelona, which was scheduled at the start of the season and then the next one will be for Dan, some time around Silverstone. From our point of view we’d rather give them one or two new chassis during the season that we have been able to check out in the factory using various testing methods. Normally we make four or five chassis during the year, maybe six, so it wouldn’t be unusual for each driver to change at least once or twice during the year. Normally they would use at least two.”

    Sebastian Vettel: “We concluded after China, where we were quite a little bit behind, to change the chassis, so actually it’s not a new chassis, it’s an old one that we used in testing in the winter, and we have some experience with it. It’s more a sanity check rather than a real problem with the other chassis. So it’s just to try everything we can and basically reset and start again.”

    Why do Red Bull lie all the time?

    1. Lindsay says:

      “Why do Red Bull lie all the time?”

      Probably for the same reason everyone else does; misdirection.

      1. alexbookoo says:

        Fair point. Let me rephrase. Why are Red Bull so careless with their lies? They don’t even lie consistently from one day to the next. It’s as if they think we’re too stupid to notice. At least with Ferrari you can just assume that everything is a lie. You know where you are then. The fans deserve better lies.

      2. justafan says:

        At least they don’t lie to race stewards. Or to the FIA.

      3. Olivenoire says:

        +1

    2. JF says:

      Really– perhaps different, or new to race use, would have been more proper IF the second chassis was not newly constructed. People really need not to overreact. I know that many hate the team that is the most successful but, if it wasn’t RedBull it would someone else.

    3. Luke says:

      One of the two you mention above has a reputation for lying or changing the story to suit the moment. I’m sure you know which one.

    4. Nick says:

      Sebastian was scheduled to get a new chassis at Barcelona.

      The new chassis he is getting is an old one they used in testing and have familiarity with, which must be slightly different to the new one he got in Australia.

      It’s not so much lying as it is everyone reading so much into what people from Red Bull say and trying to pin them for lying, cheating, manipulating etc….

      Its getting so damn tiresome. Im sure if Dan was scheduled for the new chassis there’d be a chorus of “They’re doing it because he’s upstaging Vettel and needs to be reigned back in, so they’ll give him something he hasn’t driven and see if it brings back the status quo”

    5. monsterFG says:

      Red Bull gives you lie :) ahem wings…

  8. Warren Buys says:

    A great article and welcome insight into this area of F1. Many websites only cover the fact that Seb is changing chassis’ and do not actually go into much explanation surrounding such moves and areas of chassis management other than driver preference and superstition (which makes for good news but doesn’t really provide any real solid information).

    Great work James, Mark and the crew, much appreciated.

  9. Dave P says:

    Surely this isnotthe best way to identify if there is an issue. RB should follows Williams of 92 were Mansell jumped into a suposedly bad car driven by Patrese and promptly went faster than ever.

    Vetel and Ricciardo shouldjust swop cars… then you would quickly see if its a car problem or not… much cheaper..

    1. All revved-up says:

      +1

  10. Quade says:

    Lets see if the placebo will light the fuse.

    If Ricciardo continues to beat Vettel (new chassis and all), then his confidence will really begin to take a hit and we could see the last of gasps of a champion that was.

    1. JF says:

      Don’t forget that both Hamilton, Alonso, and Raikonnen have been beaten by teammates. Hamilton and Raikonnen have both lost with the fasted car in field. Lest not start denegrating a strong career due to some strange form of prejudice. There are many strong drivers out there today, enjoy it.

      1. Poyta says:

        When exactly was Hamilton not able to win when armed with the fastest car in the field – and don’t include times when a win wasn’t possible because of mechanical failures or team stuff ups.

      2. aveli says:

        hamilton has never been beaten by his teammate. 2011 was not due to his teammate being faster and we all know it. 2007 was due to the fact that hamilton was faster.

      3. JF says:

        Points don’t lie. Button finished higher in 2011.

      4. aveli says:

        go and ask button if he outdrove hamilton in 2011. or have a look at their lap times and you will find the truth. if button finishing with more points is your victory then please don’t stop celebrating because you will never see that again.

      5. clyde says:

        I beg to differ as JF says points don’t lie

      6. KRB says:

        When did Lewis have the fastest car? 2012? Garbage. A car’s worthless if it can’t finish races.

      7. JF says:

        Fastest car in 2012. Reliability and team blunders are a different story.

      8. Poyta says:

        Exactly, when the car was reliable and the team didn’t screw him he did actually win. 2012 was an outstanding year in terms of Hamiltons performance, he was the only one that looked capable of defeating Vettel. Those that look at points only are missing the big picture.

    2. monsterFG says:

      If that were to happen I think Red Bull will give a Dan’s car to Vettel not just a wing.

  11. Troy W says:

    Whist I’ve never been a huge Vettel fan, ( but not a [mod] either), but I am always impressed with his thoughtful answers to questions. He seems to be very good at being a real person rather than a PR drone like some drivers. His comment of a “Sanity Check” makes sense…if you are not sure its in your own mind, or its the car, make some changes to prove either way.

    1. Martinique says:

      I’m not a mod either. I’m a rocker. ;-)

      1. Random 79 says:

        You must like to have a modding good time then ;)

    2. JF says:

      Just remember that there have been no world championships won with a inferior car. Vettel is one of the few current drivers smart enough to understand this fact, or at least is honest enough to admit it.

      1. aveli says:

        2008 championship winning car was not good enough to win the constructors’ championship.

      2. Brace says:

        Because Heikki is not really that good.

      3. aveli says:

        that’s another way of looking at it.

      4. Andrew says:

        There are plenty of world championships where there have been at least 2 cars of similar speed, most recently 2007 and 2008 in particular.

        Alonso’s wins 2005 and 2006 were tightly contested and Mclaren arguably had the faster car but more unreliability.

        Senna won in 1991 in a vastly inferior Mclaren and in 1990 where Ferrari and Mclaren were evenly matched.

        Prost won in 1985 and 1986 for Mclaren when the Williams were faster.

        What about 1982? There were many cars all very evenly matched, 11 winners in 16 races.

        1967 Denny Hulme?

        I could go on…

        [mod]

      5. JF says:

        Thats a good history and I agree with you. Fastest car does not always win, look at Mclaren in 2012.

      6. clyde says:

        +1

      7. KRB says:

        Depends what you mean by “inferior”. There have been plenty of DWCs won in a car that didn’t win the WCC. Hamilton was the last to do so, in 2008. His McLaren, on balance over the entire season, was not as good as the Ferrari was. So, in that sense, it is possible to win with an inferior car.

        If you mean inferior as decidedly lower-class, then you’re right: no driver, no matter how good, can win with a car that cannot be coaxed to run near the front from time to time.

        I’ve said it before, but in F1 a great driver can turn silver into gold, but they can’t turn crap into gold. The car has to be decent, and relatively close to the best car, to stand any chance.

      8. JF says:

        “Inferior” was meant to take into consideration reliability etc. The fastest car is not necessarily the best car.

      9. Andrew says:

        Thanks, but the point I was making is that some drivers do win the championship without having a massive car advantage.

        Unfortunately in the last 5 championships there has been one very dominant car. This isn’t a problem when there are 2 strong drivers, like 1988 but it was clear that Webber should have been replaced 2 seasons ago.

    3. Bring back V12's !!! says:

      You mean his incessantly long, drawn out, boring and tedious replies. He talks wayyyyyyyyyyyy too much.

  12. Franck says:

    Was it Alonso who won one of his championship with a single chassis?

    1. Bryan Purdue says:

      Buton I think

  13. Lawrence says:

    I smell something :) Red Bull sh….. ;)

    Hope he has a good weekend, I like the guy. Hope DR and him take the fight to Mercedes GP. We need it.

    1. Random 79 says:

      I just got a flashback to 1995. Well done :)

    2. justafan says:

      None has the package to take the fight to Mercedes. They are way superior this year.

  14. bmg says:

    My view on Vetel is his talant is not driving, but politics within the team.

    Do we know if Dan’s car has any upgrades?

  15. IP says:

    Now I wait for RBR to “fix” up this chassis and give it to Dan to use. I also expect Dan to outperform Seb! hahaha

    Cynicism aside, I expect RBR will probably use an extra chassis or two this year in a quest to catch the Mercs

    1. justafan says:

      I doubt Ric wants that chassis. It doesn’t run much.

  16. KRB says:

    Still one of the nicer looking cars, the RB10. I like the look of it, and the W05. Both just look fast. The Ferrari does a little, but the nose ruins it for me.

    I for one will be surprised if Ricciardo beats him again this weekend.

    1. Random 79 says:

      I won’t be :)

      1. KRB says:

        Ricciardo’s been great so far, hope he keeps it up. I’ve always rated his speed, and could never understand how some would plump for JEV over him.

        But still Vettel is their main man, they know (or believe, at this time), that if things tightened up on the grid, that it’s Vettel that could make the final difference resulting in some gained positions. I guess a sort of “form is temporary, class is permanent” line of thought. That is something Ricciardo will have to contend with through the season. Vettel will always be given the benefit of the doubt, in the team. Ricciardo just has to keep doing what he’s doing, beaming smile and being quick, quick, quick. Marko commented on his sunny demeanour this week. That’s a great quality to have. I can’t imagine anyone in the team (apart from Vettel) not liking his Happy Warrior attitude.

      2. Matthew Cheshire says:

        You have to wonder if Marko could be making Ricciardo his No.1 boy He’s a big win for him and Vettel is old news for the driver program. The next championship for Red Bull is at least a year away. You’d have to give DR even odds to be the one to win it. Marko does seem to be the kind of guy to jump ship early if it suits him..

  17. graham bowman says:

    Your right that in Spain it’s free but it’s not ideal, there are 4/5 4 minute advert breaks upon which you can still see the action but in a small box in the corner. These breaks always seem to be just as something good is happening. I stick to watching on the Internet, though bad quality you see it all and get better commentary, the live feed is from Sky f1.ilegal and free, two fingers up at abernie and sky.

    1. Siddhant says:

      Totally agree.

      i do the same since somehow star sports is able to skip all the real action during adverts.

  18. Matthew Cheshire says:

    It seems like Vettel is trying not to change his technique with the blown diffuser, even though it’s gone. Is newey telling him they’ll find more downforce and it’ll all come good? They’ve done it before.

    1. aveli says:

      a great driver will drive anything faster than the opposition.

      1. JF says:

        Too simplistic.

      2. Martin says:

        Aveli’s line is pretty much “Hamilton is the best at everything, ever in F1″. He’s suggesting Vettel isn’t great because he’s slower than Dan in this years cars.

      3. aveli says:

        simple enough for you to understand at least.

      4. clyde says:

        The world is so full of simpletons and madmen, that one need not seek them in a madhouse” :-)

  19. GarryT says:

    It’s all about confidence, that’s the real issue changing the chassis takes away the doubt and negatives,

    We will see soon maybe Vets real issue is that he isn’t as comfortable in this years technology he admits that he doesn’t like the way car brakes into corner.

    1. aveli says:

      i’d consider that if he’d just joined redbull.

  20. kenneth chapman says:

    an interesting take on the subject. a couple of points here, is the ‘new/old chassis the same as the current chassis? obviously not otherwise why change? therefore the ‘current chassis’ can’t be a bad chassis otherwise how is it that ricciardo isn’t experiencing the same problems.

    it definitely indicates that vettel’s side of the garage are desperately seeking some form of divine intervention by way of a mechanical scapegoat to deflect their hero’s drop in performance. maybe he just isn’t quite so infallible as many think? early days of course and i do expect vettel to strike back and soon but hopefully ricciardo can match this and fight the good fight.

    1. aveli says:

      they’re experienced enough to know what’s likely to influence performance.

      1. kenneth chapman says:

        @ aveli,….if as you say they are experienced enough to know etc etc etc, then they certainly haven’t shown that over the previous four races have they?

      2. aveli says:

        if they didn’t know, hey wouldn’t. E in f1.

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        @ aveli….sorry, you’ve lost me?

  21. Peter Mitchell says:

    Just hope they both have the same equipment and let their be a fair fight between the RBR boys. If Vettel performs better or faster with the new chassis I’m sure favouritism will again be spoken about.
    I think the best outcome is Dan outperforms Vettel again this way the chassis will not be in question nor will favouritism.

  22. Hiten says:

    Does Vettel lack expertise in setting up his car? From above statement it looks like he still doesnt knows whats bothering him.

  23. Jazzda says:

    It’s a chassis, by god sake, it’s absolutely rigid and equal to the other unless there’s something wrong with it, in which case RB would know for sure.

    They need to change the chassis to explain why Vettel, suddenly, has the edge over the poor Ricciardo.

    It’s as simple as that, and if I’m wrong I will eat the broken chassis.

    1. James Mathew says:

      You are spot on mate!

  24. Michael says:

    What’s going to be the excuse when Daniel beats him again? lol

    1. Random 79 says:

      Gremlins?

    2. Craig Baker says:

      I did not get enough track time in FP1 and FP2.

      1. Michael says:

        Of course. The truth of the matter is Vettel is overrated. He just cannot come to grips with a car that doesn’t stick to the road. Ricciardo has come to Redbull and outperformed him. All my doubts about Vettel has been justified this year. He’s a good driver. He’s just not special.

      2. Siddhant says:

        +1

      3. JF says:

        Too soon. 4 races in one season is not enough to make sweeping judgments.

      4. Michael says:

        @ JF Fair play. He had a very good drive in the Spanish GP.

  25. Bavman says:

    James
    Can you or Mark Gillen Advise if there have been any recent examples of teams finding issues when they swop Chassis in examples like this?
    and while off current topic, with the reduction in Revs on current engines, have any engine manufacturer reverted to Valve springs from Pneumatic Valve actuation?

  26. aveli says:

    well done to james for introducing a silver page at last!

  27. Miha Bevc says:

    Off topic, but will we see RED BULL’s ANALYSIS – F1 2014 THE STORY SO FAR?

    1. Random 79 says:

      If we’re making predictions:

      RBR: 4/10
      Vettel: 4/10
      Ricciardo: 8/10

  28. Kenneth M'Boy says:

    In 2010, Webber was given Vettel’s repaired cracked chassis (chassis #3) for the British Gp, which he went onto win. He needed a new chassis after his colossal accident in Valencia with Kovalainen’s Caterham. Mark won the British Gp in style after an awkward weekend for Red Bull, “not bad for a number 2 driver”, “Red Bull gives you wings and then Seb takes them off you”, remember? All good fun stuff.

    Two races after that, Mark destroyed the field in Hungary, in one of his best wins ever. Anyway the point of the story is that, while Red Bull can be prone to make favourable decisions towards one driver during the weekend, the boys and girls back at the factory in Milton Keynes do a fantastic job in building fast race cars, even ones that were broken and needed repairing.

    I believe this new chassis is part of their programme and they are just a team who don’t like to lose. They also know that when Seb is quick then his confidence soars and he becomes even quicker. I can’t blame them for trying anything to get his confidence back. I still hope Daniel beats him though.

  29. PxB says:

    Seb’s explanation of the chassis switch implies they don’t fully understand why he’s struggling. Perhaps that’s why the team preferred to say it was scheduled.

    By the way, I’m surprised the chassis homologation rules allow weight-saving updates.

    1. Martin says:

      I don’ there are chassis homologation rules. The tub needs to pass crash tests to be allowed to race, and that is about it. The time to design and produce them is a key constraint.

  30. stevo says:

    Seb is complaining of problems under braking and oversteer out of corners. No blown floor = no confidence in those regimes.

  31. Goob says:

    Vettel’s real problem is created by the media.

    When the media tried to force feed everyone on how great Vettel was it left a bad taste in everyone’s mouth… no one likes to be force fed lies.

    We can all see that only Newey won the WDCs and WCCs…

    The media need to admit that driving to deltas was the only reason Vettel stayed on top.

    1. justafan says:

      Indeed Newey won all of Vettel’s WDC’S. He didn’t win any with Raikkonen, though. Makes you think.

      1. JF says:

        Was only 50-50 or so with Hakkinen

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