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F1 set for 12th team on the grid as Gene Haas gets the green light from FIA
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Posted By: James Allen  |  11 Apr 2014   |  6:19 pm GMT  |  377 comments

Formula 1 will have 12 teams and 24 cars on the grid next season after the US based team Haas Racing was granted a licence to compete by the FIA.

This follows a consultation process, whereby the team’s plans, financial position and other aspects were carefully assessed by an FIA panel in early March. The panel comprised FIA deputy president for sport Graham Stoker, Charlie Whiting and other FIA figures as well as auditors, with input from Bernie Ecclestone’s FOM as well.

The team has just over nine months from now to produce a car to take part in the pre-season tests ahead of the 2015 season; quite a challenge.

Haas will be the first new team to join F1 since Caterham came on board in 2010. At that time there was supposed to be an American team called USF1, but this was not able to get everything together to make the grid. Virgin Racing, which has since been renamed Marussia, also joined the fray in 2010 as did HRT which failed after three seasons.

It is a huge undertaking to start an F1 team, a massive investment in infrastructure and personnel. There is little sign of really effective cost control on the horizon; the FIA has committed itself to bringing in a cost cap for 2015, but the level would be high initially and in any case there was not enough support for the latest plans at a recent meeting of teams in Bahrain.

Details of Haas’ plans will no doubt emerge in the coming weeks and months, but a UK base -or at least a European base – is essential from a logistical point of view.


Gunter Steiner, formerly of Jaguar Racing and early Red Bull fame, is part of the plans and has been to a number of races in the last 12 months, researching the project.

Haas is understood to be a customer of Ferrari for engines. Currently the Ferrari is the worst performing of the three units in competition but all manufactures will be able to carry out developments between the final race of 2014 and the end of February 2015 when a new homologation period will begin.

“Obviously, we’re extremely pleased to have been granted a Formula One license by the FIA. It’s an exciting time for me, Haas Automation and anyone who wanted to see an American team return to Formula 1,” said Haas.

“Now, the really hard work begins. It’s a challenge we embrace as we work to put cars on the grid. I want to thank the FIA for this opportunity and the diligence everyone put forth to see our license application come to fruition.”

There has been speculation about whether Haas might look to purchase Marussia, or even Caterham, should the teams be available for sale. The idea is to increase the grid size, but at the same time Caterham boss Tony Fernandes has said that if his team does not make a significant step this year he may well abandon F1.

There are other entities looking to start an F1 team, with former Midland Racing front man Colin Kolles heading another bid.

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377 Comments
  1. Anil Parmar says:

    Best of luck to him and I hope it means the sport will gather some more momentum over in the states. It also means we’ll have 2 more drivers on the grid for next for year, which is great as there’s some talent out there, sitting to one side.

    1. Bradley says:

      Yet to see whether they’ll be hiring talent, or if talent will be hiring them.

      1. Gudien says:

        Is there money to be made as an F-1 entrant?

      2. James Allen says:

        If the costs are brought under control, yes

      3. Christos Pallis says:

        Well Haas has said he’s going to get Dallara to build their chassis. Wasn’t there a certain team recently who did that that went by an unfortunate acronym HRT. Didn’t work out too well for their performance!

    2. Michael Powell says:

      This is excellent news for Max Chilton, he will now have two cars to lap.

      1. Michael Powell says:

        (Providing they get past the first corner)

      2. Michael Powell says:

        chapparallcars.com for a biog.

  2. Valentino from montreal says:

    Mr. Allen , you must know him and see him time to time
    ( since you are IN the F1 world ) , but what ever happened to Peter Windsor’s USA Formula One project ? I know it got cancelled but since then Peter Windsor has been pretty much low-key and no other information has been made public … I like PW a lot , he’s a HUGE Schumacher admirer …

    Thanks !!!

    1. James Allen says:

      He works with F1 Racing again and does the Racers Edge online video show

      1. Jonathan Powell says:

        He also has is own website,peterwindsor.com, which is very good,especially for historical f1.

    2. C63 says:

      There was a programme on TV the other night about a lady who was obsessed with with ladybirds. She had ladybird curtains, ladybird rugs, ladybird t-shirts and ladybird bangles. Basically, her whole life was taken over by ladybirds.
      I don’t know why your post made me think of that programme……

      1. keke says:

        Random

      2. C63 says:

        Are you a relatively new visitor to this site? Val is a legendary MSC fan – some might say he is obsessed – hence my remark :-)

    3. Steve W says:

      He also has a blog…

      http://peterwindsor.com/

  3. UAN says:

    This is great news. Wish them the best of luck. Wonder what engine they’ll be going with. Possibly Honda?

    1. Ace says:

      Honda is exclusive to Mclaren for 2015….I suspect Mclaren’s Mercedes contract engines since Renault made it clear last year they didn’t want any more customers, Ferrari haven’t made any noises so far (not that I know of anyways)

      1. Simmo says:

        On the subject of engines (nothing against your comment, just on topic):

        “Currently the Ferrari is the worst performing of the three units in competition”

        It’s a bit untrue. Sauber and Ferrari both have relatively poor cars, and Marussia is currently beating Caterham due to Chilton’s reliability (prefer Caterham though).

        The Renault has actually had worse problems, during the races themselves, and I wouldn’t rate their performance better / worse than Ferrari engines just yet.

      2. James Clayton says:

        Do you have a source confirming Honda is exclusive to McLaren. Last quote I heard from Honda was something along the lines of “we’ll need to supply at least one other team”. I’m guessing it’d be one of the back-marker teams, though.

      3. Longy says:

        Last I heard they originally (ie their first season – 2015) will supply only Mclaren but after the first year not only does it make sense financially for them to supply other teams, it’s actually a legal requirement of their involvement to offer to supply other teams.

      4. Richard says:

        Exclusive to McLaren in 2015, and from 2016 and onwards they will be forced by regulations to supply another team I believe.

      5. Andrew Carter says:

        It was confirmed at the time of the announcement that it would be an exclusive deal for McLaren for the first year.

      6. James Clayton says:

        Thank you for all your responses… does anybody have a link to the announcement where this was said??

    2. C63 says:

      @UAN Wonder what engine they’ll be going with….

      From the article; ‘Haas is understood to be a customer of Ferrari for engines’.

      I wasn’t sure if you noticed, but there is an article above the comments section. More often than not, it’s worth reading that before posting a comment :-)

      1. UAN says:

        @C63

        yes you are correct and I’m duly chastised :) . I read the article at work, so skimmed through it more than I realized.

        Or perhaps I just blanked it out because I couldn’t mentally process anyone wanting a Ferrari engine right now lol. (yes, I’m sure Ferrari will improve it by next year no doubt!).

      2. grat says:

        From Haas himself in an interview:

        “There’s only three engine suppliers, you’ve got Renault, Mercedes, Ferrari,” Haas said last week. “There’s not too much to pick from. Next year there will be Honda, but probably Honda is not really viable. … It’s kind of up in the air.

        “It’s up to us to negotiate that (price). We have talked to Mercedes and with Ferrari, just preliminary discussions, but we haven’t nailed anything down yet. I guess that would be the next move.”

    3. Mike says:

      Am I missing something? It says in the article that they are understood to be a partner of Ferrari for engines.

    4. Gary says:

      If Haas is going to employ Danica as his F1 driver then he may want to get Briggs & Stratton as his engine supplier, as that is the only engine make in which Danica has had any meaningful success.

  4. Mike84 says:

    Makes sense for Ferrari as US is its biggest market (so have heard), but if I were paying so much and working so hard to start a new F1 team right now, I’d only do it with a Mercedes engine.

    How do you get sponsors when you have the worst engine, let’s show everyone how slow we are.

    1. David in Sydney says:

      I read recently that China was actually Ferrari’s, or was it Maserati’s, biggest market now.

    2. Simmo says:

      The Ferrari isn’t bad, it just hasn’t had its chance to shine yet.

      Also, maybe Ferrari have the best (or only) offer.

      Anyway, next year the engines will most likely all be on a similar level.

    3. super seven says:

      Formula 1 doesn’t have a big following in the USA. I can count the number of people in my office who follow the sport on the fingers of one hand.

      I doubt that having a sort of US team tooling around at the back of next year’s championship will make much difference to that, particularly if they are really another British based squad with British engineers.

      I suspect Gene is doing this more to raise his company’s profile in the rest of the world’s than he is to raise the sport’s profile in the USA.

      It probably makes sense for Ferrari, as the type of people who buy Ferraris will be more likely to be aware of F1. I wonder how much technology sharing they will get from that deal, regarding chassis and wind tunnel support. They will need a lot if they are going to avoid the 107% rule in season one.

      1. Kay says:

        They’ll probably need to snap up people from NASA, Lockheed Martin or Boeing to develop an aero efficient car if the team’s to be US based.

      2. cos says:

        How about boat designers…I’m sepcifically thinking of those who work on the AC72 such as Oracle Team USA boat in the America’s Cup…although how many of those designers were / are “American” I’m not sure

    4. Martin says:

      The thing to remember is that Haas’ bid has been in the works for at least a year. The Ferrari link was known before testing started, so demonstrated performance of the engine was not really a factor.

      Commercially the Ferrari deal possibly made the most sense as Ferrari only had two customers once the Torro Rosso switch became clear.

  5. Ashboy says:

    If i was haas i would be trying to get a Honda, as we know they will be the best next season.

    1. Random 79 says:

      Do we?

    2. j says:

      I say Honda won’t be the best next year. I expect Mercedes to keep their number 1 spot.

      1. C63 says:

        I hope you are right. There is certainly a great deal more to the Mercedes AMG PETRONAS, than just a good PU.

    3. Ahmad says:

      Sorry, if I were Haas, I would be trying to get a Mercedes engine. Ferrari are not getting better any time soon, and let McLaren enjoy their exclusivity with Honda. I expect Honda to do better than the Ferrari engine department, but I doubt very much they’ll be better than Mercedes or Renault for their first year.

      If Haas go with the Ferrari name in the hope that they’ll get better next year, then good luck to them, they’ll probably be fighting the Marussias.

    4. Grant H says:

      Hmm honda quick out of box, wont they be a year behind!

    5. Rich B says:

      why do we know that? when Honda left in 2008 they had the least powerful engine.

    6. Ashboy says:

      They are outside FIA controll till next season, plus they have first hand knowledge of the Merc unit. I bet Honda strip a Merc unit down to see exactly what they have done. They will see the split turbo, and design there unit with that in mind, not as an after thought like Ren & Ferria will have to. They can test there PU in a car and not just dyno like the others have to. They can run full scale models in the wind tunnel, not just 60% models, so they won’t have the packaging problems some teams had this year. So I think they will at least be on par with Merc, if not in front.

      1. C63 says:

        I bet Honda strip a Merc unit down…

        Not a chance, do you really think the folk in F1 are that dim?

      2. StevenM says:

        McLaren doesnt get to keep the engines, they belong to Mercedes, and they’re sealed. The team can’t open them, intellectual property and all that

      3. jake says:

        Not a chance they have stripped down a Merc PU, they will be well protected and sealed. Sure they have been fed a ton of data tho’.

      4. Richard says:

        Honda is not allowed to “strip a Merc unit down”.
        The FIA probably keeps an eye on this to make sure that Honda doesn’t just steal Mercedes latest piece of art.

      5. Andrew Carter says:

        And how would Honda get a hold of a Merc engine? The Merc engineers wont even let the McLaren boys near the car when they’re working on the engine, Mercedes is being very protective of it’s design and with good reason.

      6. Ashboy says:

        Mclaren will have some PU’s at the MTC. You think no Honda employees will be dressed in Mclaren gear at the races? Also Merc was quick out the box so why can’t anybody else? Honda have some clues which direction is the best, the three at the moment had to hope they had the best. Honda also have a bench mark for power and fuel efficiency.

      7. Kay says:

        Pwnd.. I guess people pretty much replied what I wanted to say.

        Though one thing to add: Merc already said ahead of 2014 that they’ll have people inside the McLaren garage just to ensure nobody looks into their engines (implying Honda, of course).

  6. KGBVD says:

    It’s nice to see an American entry that involves credible parties with actual funding – not like USGP fiasco. I read a rumour elsewhere that they intend to use Ford-branded Cosworths…

    1. Random 79 says:

      I’m hoping they’ll be an American entry that involves credible parties with actual funding, but if that fails then as second option they can be an American entry that involves incredible parties with actual fun :)

      1. Rich C says:

        Sorry, “fun” not allowed by FIA!
        This is serious bidness!

      2. Tyemz says:

        Random 79, never one to miss a random opening for a joke. Makes one search the comments section at random for a Random joke.

      3. Random 79 says:

        Happy to be of service :)

    2. grat says:

      The Cosworth engine is probably frozen at the “V6 with a turbo” stage– Cosworth, without funding, suspended development of the V6. I’m sure they could knock together a good, solid V6, but they don’t have that much expertise with the MGU/K and MUG/H units, let alone the energy store.

      Given that Fiat owns both Ferrari and Chrysler, they could always put the Ferrari 059/3 engine in the car, and slap a “Dodge” label on it. :)

  7. Gaz Boy says:

    I always get the impression that the Yanks struggle to get to grips with F1 – no pun intended – mainly on a cultural level. Or is that harsh?
    Most people who work in F1 teams are British or Commonwealth – Australians, New Zealanders, South Africans mainly – and these lads and lasses have a very dry, sarcastic, ironic sense of humour which has very sophisticated nuances and subtexts which is completely lost on the Yanks.
    Americans don’t understand irony in the same way the don’t understand the metric system – you know that measurement and weight system that uses power of 10s – so that’s another potential issue. “Hank, what’s the weight of an F1 car buddy? Well Tod, apparently its some darn stupid measurement called 700 KG. Why don’t the stupid limeys and wops use pounds eh?”
    And then there’s the language barrier. “Britain and America are the same countries. Apart from the language obviously” – courtesy of Oscar Wilde. A Yank calling someone “a darn stupid ass-hole” in F1 will cause some frowns in the F1 paddock. Not because F1 people don’t swear, but it’s actually pronounced “arse”. Also, fuel used in F1 is petrol, colour is spelt with a u, grey is spelt with an e, tyre is spelt with a y,a gearbox is a gearbox not a shifter………I could go on and on.
    And then there’s the main clincher – grand prix corners have corners that turn right.
    Otherwise, welcome to F1 Gene. Good luck mate…………by the way, saying “alright mate?”, that’s how people in the F1 paddock greet each other.

    1. titanracer says:

      as an American, I thank you for making my day! funny and true stuff, Dude :)

    2. Random 79 says:

      Good to see you have your finger on the cultural pulse of F1 Gaz. Now if only you could pull your foot out of your mouth you’d be unstoppable ;)

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        Maybe, but some home truths hurt sometimes, don’t they?
        Remember Michael Andretti circa 1993? Or Scott Speed? I think they were as much baffled by European/British and commonwealth culture as they were in driving a car with a semi automatic gearbox.

      2. Dave Aston says:

        Yeah, or Phil Hill, or Dan Gurney, or Richie Ginther, or Mario Andretti, or Peter Revson, or Mark Donahue. The USA has produced more world champion drivers (2) than France, and as many as Germany, and Italy.

      3. Random 79 says:

        Not sure about Andretti, but I think Scott Speed was more baffled by Franz Tost than anything else.

        Or maybe it was boffed…

      4. Andrew Carter says:

        I think Scott Speed had more trouble with Franz Tosts fists than the culture he’d been a part of since he was 16.

    3. aezy_doc says:

      Sometimes Gaz Boy your posts are intelligent and engaging. Other times you must let your six year old cousin use your login. This is a case in point. (unless by some weird way you are being ironic and showing every yank who reads this what irony is?)

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        If you read my post I’m not criticising Mr Haas personally, and I didn’t say his team are not welcome in F1. What I was pointing out – with a touch of British sarcasm, yes I’ll admit that – is that Americans struggle to adapt to the finesse and delicacy of British/European culture, and that includes F1.
        A good analogy is an American footballer coming over to Europe to play actual football………

      2. aezy_doc says:

        Just keep digging mate.

      3. keke says:

        I thought F1 was an international sport. I heard the Germans get the sport as well. What about the Italians, the Spanish, Japanese…..

      4. Gilles ladouceur says:

        Please stop speaking for other cultures i.e. British/European ,the italians,,,spanish,,,french all have their own cultures and opinions,,, good example is the french coming up with french fries,,,,french kiss and french ticklers while the british came up with english muffins,,,mmmmmm you sure you want to brag about being british??? Ha just having fun lad.

        signed “the crazy french canuck” yahhhoooo tabarnack

      5. Mhilgtx says:

        Maybe he forgets Ben Franklins satire on how to rule a colony. That was lost in the Brits as well

    4. AlexD says:

      so funny:-)

      1. Michael says:

        @ AexD U must be British!!!

      2. AlexD says:

        No, I am Russian.

      3. Michael says:

        Sure, you are buddy.

    5. Stephen Craig says:

      Yep, harsh.

    6. furstyferret says:

      Oh dear, matron

    7. Andy says:

      I always thought it was because they only participated in sports they new they could win, or as an alternative they created their own that no-one else participates in, Win-Win US style.

      1. Michael says:

        @ Andy Your jealousy is showing. lol

      2. Michael says:

        @ Andy American Football is the only sport that is not played world wide. Every other sport in America is played in other Countries. Again, think before u speak!!!

      3. Andy says:

        I suggest you check the definition of ‘worldwide’ before you write!!!

      4. Michael says:

        Maybe, I should say Countries outside the US. For your information the UK and Europe isn’t the end all be all, sorry.

      5. Andy says:

        Very true Michael, Europe isn’t the b all and end all, and I would never suggest so. My view is that the US prefers it’s home grown sports more, be it Indy Car, Nascar, Baseball etc.
        Perhaps my opinion is tainted by things such as World Series Baseball. Either way, I don’t subscribe to the theory that the US doesn’t understand F1, they just prefer their own motorsports, and that can be seen in their attendances.

    8. PhilipB says:

      Well Gaz your frequent use of the word “Yank” (which is derived from yankee, a very small portion of the US population, not unlike cockney) shows your deep understanding of the culture over here. I’m sure you had a great time in Orlando and are now fully familiar with the customs, nuances and cultural norms of the USA.

      Nest time you turn on your Apple, Dell, Microsoft or IBM product you can see just how terrible we are at coming to grips with mathematical systems beyond our fuddy duddy old pounds and inches.

      As for word Gasoline, you can thank your fellow countryman John Cassell and his imported Pennsylvania fuel he sold as Cazeline.

      Ironic isn’t it?

      1. Michael says:

        +1 tell ‘em PhilipB

      2. Racyboy says:

        BOOM!

        …and can I just add, NASA,Silicone Valley and the Drug industry seem to be coping quite well with the metric system.

        I just smoked a fag, doing that in London or New York could be two very different things.

      3. Torchwood Five says:

        Well, if you are going to bring NASA into this, didn’t a Mars rover, or other planetary probe smash into the destination planet, because the European scientists sent over the distance from Earth in metrics, then the US engineers that launched the actual spacecraft didn’t convert the numbers to Imperial?

      4. Gaz Boy says:

        You know when I said Americans don’t understand sarcasm/irony/wit/hyperbole…………..
        If you think I’m being harsh – Michael Andretti and Scott Speed come to mind?!
        Like I said, good luck to Mr Haas………but this ins’t the burgers and Budwesier series of NASCAR, and unless he’s he did his technical and cultural homework very thoroughly he will be find the rarefied world of F1 a difficult beast.
        PS The Internet was invented by an Englishman, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. Englishmen/women also created the English language………….that’s quite a legacy. So I think we’ve earned the right to puff out our chests.

      5. Gaz Boy says:

        Just to add, Britain and Europe has a belief in less is more – downsizing. Britain and Europe were the pioneers of the Mini, the mini-skirt, the Fiat 500, the sandwich, the Renault Twingo, the small cottage, etc
        That downsizing also applies to the shop window of the European car industry, F1, what with these new hybrid turbo V6 engines.
        Americans believe in up-sizing (especially visually), I can’t imagine Hank J Dieselburger Jnr pootling about in a little Fiat 500. And that’s my point. When it comes to social and cultural matters, F1 and NASCAR exist on different planets. A good analogy is like having Sly Stallone appear in a EM Forster or Agatha Christie novel. Or a Saville Row tailor making bespoke dungarees.
        Still, it is Mr Haas money, time and effort, I wish him well, but I don’t think Americans realise just how political and machiavellian Formula 1 really is.

      6. Mhilgtx says:

        NASCAR fans won’t warm up to F1 en mass. BUT then again NASCAR is only really popular in a small part of the country.

        NASCAR is too well run to compare with F1 in many ways. I am not a fan of NASCAR it is too boring to me but if F1 could really penetrate over here it would be great. I keep hearing how it is a tough nut to crack this market and then wonder if F1 really tries. The first step would be to schedule the races at a more favorable time. The US tv contract could dwarf the British contract without even really trying.

        .

      7. Mike says:

        IBM waste of time and out of date. Don’t get me started on Microsoft!

      8. WSH says:

        Indeed, quite ironic. Lovely reactions when people are poked, with tongue in cheek obviously, on their cultural differences.

      9. PhilipB says:

        Oh I was tongue in cheek alright. Seemed like the Gaz wasn’t too keen to swallow his own medicine.

    9. StevenM says:

      But who saved your asses in WW2? Didn’t care about the measurement system then

      1. kgbvd says:

        Neither did they.

      2. AndyC says:

        We hadn’t gone metric then. :)

      3. Sebee says:

        …saved your arses.

      4. Darrin from Canada says:

        And yet again Sebee nails it… Subtle yet devastating (In only 3 words)

      5. Michael says:

        I doubt he was alive. He needs to read the History books.

      6. Chuck 32 says:

        Steven; Current best guess is about 78 MILLION people died during WW2. Obviously not much ass saving when on.
        Considering the Task, Haas appears to be quite a brave man. Considering the prose, Gaz Boy is absent anything of value to write.

      7. Schnell! schnell! says:

        The Russians.

      8. Chris Chong says:

        Don’t mention the war…

      9. Matt says:

        Wake up and smell the roses Cletus, it ain’t the 1940s no more ;)

      10. Gaz Boy says:

        Did I mention WW2? Did I mention Pearl Harbour, Vietnam, September 11th or the Boston Bombings? I mentioned cultural differences, not wars.

      11. Gaz Boy says:

        PS Britain doesn’t have a “British dream”. There is no “British dream” because we’re awake.

      12. C63 says:

        @GazBoy

        when you are in a hole. Rule number one; stop digging!

      13. Michael says:

        @ Gaz Boy You’ve opened up a can of worms and should really think before opening your mouth.

      14. Random 79 says:

        @C63

        You can say a lot of things about Gaz, but you can’t say he’s not a hard worker.

        Once that boy gets digging… :)

      15. eff1ohsaurus says:

        Gaz you are, my dear Commonwealth friend, an extremely funnay man…

        as for the “keep digging” comments…ironic a slang term used in Nasacr is applied to a Brit who teases Americans…

        As darryl Waltrip says on ESPN…”keep digging, just keep digging boys…”

        as for the South Africans…boys, we have car theft down to an art form here.

        I tell you, employ a few Saffa’s and within the time it takes to do a pitstop we’ll have hijacked a Merc (Wa-Benzi in the townships), resprayed it red and renamed it a Ferrari, changed tyres, slapped on some low profile “tackies” and, if there’s an Indian from Durban in the team, probably dropped in a gazillion watt sound system and undercar neon lighting…

        Just give our boys a chance…LOLOL

      16. clyde says:

        Heh Heh :-)

      17. Bomboi69 says:

        Oh, for heaven’s sake !! It’s aRses, not aSses…..

        As for Americans understanding irony – I once heard the excellent (American) comedian Reginald D Hunter say “Americans don’t want to ‘get’ irony. Once you’ve ‘got’ irony, it’s a small step to ‘getting’ hypocrisy and then the whole of our financial system would collapse.”

        A fair point, well made…..

      18. Andrew Carter says:

        I guess they have irony then?

      19. justafan says:

        It was mainly the battle for Stalingrad what decided the outcome of WW2. But we do appreciate the US intervention too, of course.

      20. Bradley says:

        The Russians used metric, did they not?

      21. Mike says:

        Saved our asses! Can you name one major war you’ve actually won when you haven’t had British help – I can’t think of one?

      22. Rednexas says:

        Uh…the Revolutionary War?

      23. WSH says:

        Right, and that point is relevant for F1 because….?

      24. Realist says:

        I know that one: the Red Army

      25. Dave says:

        And that is how you end a comment line about the British and the Americans differences

      26. Carl Craven says:

        Please don’t make disrespectful comments that distort the truth.

      27. Nessie says:

        Calm down guys, there WILL be cultural differences but the team will be based in Europe with mostly European personnel, which makes sense. Imagine us trying to start a NASCAR team, who would you employ? Americans, because they have the experience. Starting an F1 Team from scratch is a VERY brave move on his part, its a MONSTER and not like anything else in motorsports. I wish them well, we need a US team, we need the exposure in the States for the manufacturers, a second US GP would also be helpful. Good luck guys but don’t call me, I’m a little too old to be doing 20 hour days for the next two years.

      28. Andrew Carter says:

        I expect Haas will have two bases, one in America based around the excellent Windsheer windtunnel he already owns for R&D and design purposes and the race team in the UK for logistical reasons. Plenty of expats and capable American engineers in America that could make this work out fine.

      29. Mhilgtx says:

        +1

      30. StevenM says:

        Hahaha!! Loving this!! Getting all you brits all worked up! Seems you never heard of sarcasm. By the way, I live in California, but I’m not American.

    10. David in Sydney says:

      Hmmm… Americans… I guess landing on the Moon and developing the Space Shuttle are not as amazingly technological as F1?

      I think it’s more their drivers than their engineers that have problems. Something to do with having trouble turning right…

      1. Wade Parmino says:

        Phil Hill and Mario Andretti? Mario has won in NASCAR, Indy and Formula 1.

        By the way, if turning left constantly is so easy, why didn’t a great F1 driver such as Montoya annihilate the Americans at NASCAR? Or Marcos Ambrose, who is an excellent touring car driver, winning the V8 Supercar championship. Ambrose has struggled on the oval tracks and has surprisingly not been any where near as good on the road courses as I expected him to be when he first moved to NASCAR several years ago.

      2. David in Sydney says:

        Oh please, I was being funny…. and responding to the preposterous comment about American engineers…

      3. ScottM says:

        To be fair Ambrose has pretty decent stats on the road courses, if not dominant though.
        Starts – 12
        Wins – 2
        Podium – 6
        Top 10 – 10
        DNF – 2

    11. JTW says:

      Wow. Talk about stereotypes and broad generalizations … As a Canadian, I’m insulted on behalf of the Americans.

      1. James Allen says:

        I agree this should not have passed moderation apologies

        Gaz Boy please time it down it we will have to mod these comments out

      2. Gaz Boy says:

        Sorry James, perhaps my prose was somewhat cack-handed – in fact reading it now, it was – I apologise for that. Sarcasm and irony don’t always translate well. I apologise for that as well.
        I should have written it in a more “sober” prose. I will in the future, so I’ve learned my lesson.
        In my defence, I would say it is a legitimate point about the massive cultural, technical and social differences between running a NASCAR/Indycar team and F1.
        I remember the likes of Michael Andretti, Bobby Rahal at Jaguar (2001) and recently Scott Speed totally failing to get used to the rarefied, back-stabbing and intrigue fuelled world of F1. That’s my point: F1 is a very, very political world and its not like the matey, good ole boys world of NASCAR.
        Also in my defence, I never criticised Mr Haas or his team personally. Like I said, good luck to him, but I hope he is street-wise and savvy enough to cope in the shark-infested waters of F1. When Eddie Jordan started his F1 team in 1991 he called it “The Piranha club”, now its more like the club of Great White Sharks!
        Anyway, I do apologise, personally, the more teams and cars on the grid, the better. I just hope new teams are politically savvy and street wise to cope in the cut-throat world of F1 – ask Caterham or Marussia.

      3. Rich C says:

        sigh… but you modded out my excellent explanation of “metric” vs “our” system of measurement. Oh well… ;D

      4. ronspeak says:

        Errrr…..the phrase about stable doors and horses springs to mind old chap.
        Anyway too much jingoism, egotism (bruised and otherwise) flying around – just like F1 really ;-)

      5. justin says:

        On the upside, it did provide for entertaining reading!

      6. F458 says:

        How did the subject of a new US F1 team joining the grid turn into making stereotypical comments about a nation? As F1 fans we should be celebrating a new team coming into our sport and not denouncing it before it has begun.

        As a Brit can I just say we don’t all make narrow minded comments.

    12. Simmo says:

      Is that harsh? Yes, yes it is.

      Also, there are a lot of Italians hanging about in garages and stuff, and I reckon a fair amount of Germans too. And the occasional appearance by the paddock’s favourite Flavio Briatore!

    13. Valentino from montreal says:

      Don’t like seing the word “wop” in your post …

      No wonder Schumacher refused to drive for Ron Dennis and McLaren … He felt more at ease at Ferrari , his “second family” in Maranello , than having to put up with those stuck up British … McLaren would have ruined his career ….

      1. Rich B says:

        he felt at home at Ferrari because they agreed to make him the clear number one.

      2. Andrew Carter says:

        Because he had so much trouble with Jordan and Benetton, remind me what country they are/were based in again?

        Schumacher went to Ferrari because they offered him more money, and Willi Webber is “Mr 20%”, but by all accounts he wasn’t convinced at first as he was too used to lapping the red cars, but since he could take Brawn and Byrne with him that was OK. Also, remind me what country Brawn’s from, who I believe is a good friend of Michael’s?

        Gaz was being the kind of idiot that makes me embarrassed to be British, but no more of an idiot than you.

    14. nhial says:

      F1 snobbery at its best. Or was that a failed attempt at “dry British” humor? F1 has no boundaries physically or culturally. Its talents and technology comes from all over the world whether we talking about its drivers, engineers or executives. To claim a certain geographic location is responsible for producing the product that is F1, is thievery!

    15. Chris George says:

      Sorry to all the Americans who wasted their time reading Gaz’s post. If it’s any consolation he pretty much always describes Rob Smedley as ‘A great Yorkshire bloke who likes a pint’. Rob Smedley is from Teesside and probably considers himself no more Yorkshire than I do (as a Teessider myself). Gaz isn’t that well informed but he is an enthusiastic Formula 1 fan and contributor to this site and that’s good enough for me. Keep up the good work Gaz!

      1. PhilipB says:

        Personally I’ve been thoroughly enjoying the whole thing. No offense taken or intended.

        Like Mr. Smedley though, referring to a Georgia good ‘ol boy as a “yank” might get you on the wrong side of a Smith & Wesson.

    16. WSH says:

      “Excellent, capital, jolly good. Shall I put the kettle on? A good cup of tea always helps to sort things out.”

      But aren’t the red coats still living in the “stones” age?

      Ehm, weren’t the frogs the ones that came up with that silly metric system. And now one runs the F1 too. Ok, the Brits may have the best F1 (not road ones) car engineers and designers, but for a real F1 engines they still have to cross the channel to the continent.

      The British are perhaps just as far from Europe as the USA is.

      USA, welcome back to F1. Perhaps you can teach the F1 folks how to bring their beloved sport closer to their fans.

      1. Andrew Carter says:

        Errr, Mercs design and build their engines in Brixworth, a few miles up the road from Brackley were the F1 team is based.

        And Bernie isn’t going to pay any attention regarding fan interaction.

      2. WSH says:

        Brixworth it is, indeed. Thanks for pointing that out. I wonder though how Merc Germany is involved as this tech should also be road car relevant.

        And Bernie not being interested in fan interaction is a good reason for him to make way for someone who does.

      3. Martin says:

        Going off the top of my head, the initial McLaren KERS system was really a product of Stuttgart, although McLaren rarely made that clear.

        I also recall Norbert Haug commenting that the German end would contribute to the ideas in Brixworth. I suspect that continues. The reason the Mercedes engine is so good is primarily due to board decisions to invest heavily and have good engineering management.

      4. Andrew Carter says:

        “Brixworth it is, indeed. Thanks for pointing that out. I wonder though how Merc Germany is involved as this tech should also be road car relevant.

        And Bernie not being interested in fan interaction is a good reason for him to make way for someone who does.”

        I suspect Merc Germany’s involvment will be mostly around the MGU-H/K and the battery.

        Frankly the number of reasons for getting rid of Bernie is getting ridiculously long, its what 20 years since he last did anything really good for the sport.

    17. Random 79 says:

      If it’s any consolation Gaz I think you might have just broken the record for most replies to a single comment.

      Not saying that’s going to equal winning the Nobel peace prize any time soon, but it’s still something to stick on your fridge :)

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        I sold my old fridge to Montoya. I also think he’s using the old 2.4 litre V8 engine to power it.
        If you watch Jeremy Clarkson’s interview on the Michael Mcintyre show which aired recently, Jezza explains the different social-motoring/motor sporting culture that I was trying to explain, but of course the written/typed word doesn’t work as well as the television equivalent – and of course there is the benefit Jezza’s immaculate public school vowels and diction and unique humour.
        It’s well worth a look if you can view it.

      2. Gaz Boy says:

        To be honest, if you watch Top Gear in Alabama – and the reaction Jezza and co got – the response from my post is a gentle English spring evening by comparison.

      3. Random 79 says:

        True enough, but then again you can’t say that they weren’t provoked into that reaction just a little bit ;)

    18. Andrew Carter says:

      It’s Long Beach this weekend and Ryan Hunter-Reay is on poll for Andretti Autosport, I think the Americans know how to turn right as well as left quite nicely.

    19. Robert says:

      As an American that has been living in the UK for 8 years now, all I can say is that you learn to adapt in short order. You change your Word spell check to the UK dictionary, and watch some UK TV for a bit.

      And Indy Car has circuits with real corners now…Rasscasse they are not, but corners of some description. And the Indy drivers are used to driving turbo PUs.

      They will be fine. As EVERYTHING else in this world is becoming more homogeneous, so will racing…

    20. grat says:

      I think you understand Americans about as well as a blind man understands Pantone.

      There’s simply too much cultural diversity within the USA to make any one stereotype fit.

      Oh, and Tim Berners-Lee invented the HTTP protocol and HTML markup language. “The Internet”, that is, the TCP/IP network that connects all those web sites, was invented in the USA as a DARPA project.

      As far as left and right turns go, I’ll just share this image:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Road_atlanta_esses.JPG

      I’m not sure which is tighter– turn 11 at Long Beach, or the Loews hairpin at Monaco. Both are pretty brutal.

  8. Cuba says:

    Doesn’t prize money only go down to 10th place? So the more teams enter, the more back marker teams will miss out on funding.

    1. Random 79 says:

      Not if the new(er) teams are backmarkers themselves (as they probably will be).

      Status quo.

    2. KING Arthur says:

      Guess you mustn’t, be a back marker to miss out on the cheese then

    3. Keith says:

      Redistribute Ferrari excess. They aren’t using it wisely. :)

    4. Cuba says:

      Caterham currently have an effective 50% chance of prize money, this will drop to 33% (or lower if there are more teams).
      Not a good sign for them staying in the sport, given Tony F’s recent comments (and financial situation).
      If teams start to leave because the chance of prize money drops significantly, then the grid isn’t really expanding.

    5. Grant H says:

      Exactly my thoughts F1 does not need more back markers whats the point, im of the opinion new teams cant be sucessful too much investment, too much tech personnel located in a small area of UK, you dont start an F1 team to make money

      Unless they can bring the costs of F1 down little point in adding new teams

      1. jake says:

        “Back markers” are essential for the sport, they feed talent up to the leading teams. and not just drivers. Somebody has to come last. I think they deserve a bit of the pie.

      2. Grant H says:

        Its not the “backmarker” i have a problem with, its the fact none of those teams develop and always end up on a knife edge in terms of survival financially so not much point in my mind

    6. Fastfastfast says:

      This is where Sack-of Yen-amoto comes in. Sorry, I meant Sakon Yamamoto.

      In short, this is where the paid drivers come in.

    7. Andrew Carter says:

      F1 payments are made in 3 “columns”. Column 1 is the big money paid out to for being historically successful, or in RBR’s case Bernie’s mates,Column 2 is championship positions down to 10th and Column 3 is a small sum for 11th and beyond.

  9. Andrew M says:

    So we’ll have another tier of performance at the back of the grid, awesome.

    1. Mike from Colombia says:

      Caterham and Marrussia should put together a B team..or buy into this.

    2. Darrin from Canada says:

      Anyone who assumes that a team run by Gene Haas will be a back marker for long has no idea who Gene Haas is. He is not a businessman who races on weekends for fun, he is a racer.

      FYI in America the term Automation is used for companies that make control systems for various industries (It’s what I do for a living) Petroleum, manufacturing, space telescopes, that kind of thing. If you think that people who manufacture “Fizzy Drinks” (I dislike that term) have a lot of money and expertise, you need to buckle your seat belts and take some notes. Very soon he will start winning…

  10. Sebee says:

    Boys and Girls,

    Will Ferrari do a “2013 McLaren” this year?

    1. Simmo says:

      So basically, completely fail miserably?

      I hope not! Hope it’s just engine maps or whatever they have to adjust now, and some aero upgrades may do it. I reckon that the chassis itself is actually quite good.

    2. Random 79 says:

      I assume you mean not get a podium result all year?

      Possible, although I think that would destroy whatever morale the team has left.

    3. AlexD says:

      As a ferrari fan, i hope so….alonso will leave and LDM will….maybe understand that a change is needed

    4. C63 says:

      What, paint their cars silver?

    5. justafan says:

      No. Alonso will finally get it right and claim the title. Like Schumi in his 5th year.

      1. Sebee says:

        Sarcasm?

      2. Richard says:

        Regardless of which driver drives for Ferrari, they way they run now they will never ever get a title again.

    6. ferggsa says:

      I hope so, if that means start slow, pick up a bit later in the season and end in 5th place

      Right now it looks like they might end up behind the 4 Merc teams plus RB and Lotus when they become reliable, fighting TR and their Ferrari engined customers

      I dont blame Luca for leaving Malaysia after watching his WDC manned RedCabs being passed by the India taxi driven by the, not yet ready for prime time Mexican

      Talk about ups and downs in F1

      1. justin says:

        And being carved up week in week out by one of the men they overlooked in Hulkenberg.

  11. Chris NZ says:

    I wonder if he should even considering buying another current f1 team who is struggling like Lotus? If he has the funds im sure they will sell it

    Maybe Torro Rosso as an option.

    Starting a team from scratch under the current regs seems like a logistical nightmare

    1. Rich C says:

      Why buy trouble when you can make it yourself?

    2. Simmo says:

      I don’t think Red Bull are letting go of the Toro quite yet!

      I heard BMW are now showing some interest (probably just a miscellaneous rumor), but they would potentially make a great Enstone buyer to add the list of team names.

    3. James Clayton says:

      “I wonder if he should even considering buying another current f1 team who is struggling like Lotus?”

      Why would you buy a team that’s laden with debt? Just seems like an incredible waste of money.

    4. Ahmad says:

      I agree that buying an existing team is easier just like RBR and Mercedes did. But Lotus is not worth it (too many debts), Toro Rosso is not for sale. Probably Caterham would be the best/cheapest option if TF decides to sell.

      But on the other side, if he just wanted to buy a team, then there was little point in applying for a new FIA entry. So I don’t think that Haas will buy an existing team. He probably has a plan which he must have described in his FIA application.

  12. AlexD says:

    “Formula 1 will have 12 teams and 24 cars on the grid next season after the US based team Haas Racing was granted a licence to compete by the FIA.”

    I am not certain Caterham and Lotus will be on the grid next year.

    1. David in Sydney says:

      Caterham will be. I plan to buy them when Our Tony gets bored.

      1. jakobusvdl says:

        Glad to hear that David, best livery on the grid
        Let me know if you need a sub, I’ll chip in to the buy out ;-)

      2. David in Sydney says:

        I was a deal like Brawn… do you think he’ll help me out by taking it off his hands?

      3. justin says:

        Yes, Fan F1, a consortium of F1 fans chipping in to buy a team.

    2. Rich C says:

      Then I will have to console myself that neither the real nor the faux “Lotus” would be in F1 and all that drama a few years back was for naught!

    3. Dren says:

      I sadly don’t know which would be the better buy. Lotus has lost a lot of talent. Caterham just can’t make the next step. Surely Haas knows how much it takes to win.

      1. Robert says:

        They key differentiator is that Lotus is own by a hugely greedy investment company, and they will not leave unless they get the best financial deal possible. Tony has other businesses, and might be happy to ditch Caterham at a firesale price just to stem the flow of red ink, as Honda did to Brawn in 2009. There is no way anyone would pick to buy Lotus over Caterham given the disparity of the counter-parties.

    4. Sebee says:

      Sauber, Marussia?

      Plenty at risk here. Maybe Haas will just buy one of these?

      1. super seven says:

        I doubt it. If that was his plan, he wouldn’t have needed to splash out the entry cash required for a new team

  13. Matt says:

    I’m from the states and I hope they select talent that will help them get the job done. I hope they don’t select Americans just because they are Americans. The majority of my friends do not understand how complex F1 is. Sadly, a number of them feel that Haas needs to go over and show them how its done.

    I believe it will not be easy and I’m frequently mocked for my views on how hard F1 is. I’m thrilled to see another entry into the sport. I hope and pray it will not be a repeat display of Michael Andretti’s arrogance in 1993. I watched sadly as he flew to races and had an attitude of superiority that was disgraceful.

    Gene Haas and the team he builds need to approach this cautiously with the utmost respect. It will be a very hard road.

    1. Random 79 says:

      I expect you’re right, but then again he could rock up with the equivalent of a GT40.

      Unlikely, but you never know :)

      1. Matt says:

        That would be awesome. More genuine competition in F1 would be a welcome surprise for all of us I’m sure.

      2. Random 79 says:

        And best of all could you imagine LDM’s reaction? :D

      3. audifan says:

        the GT40 was in reality a Lola , and I thought that following the demise of that company haas bought up some of their assets ….maybe that is what he is going to develop although I doubt that eric will be back at the drawing board !!

      4. Andrew Carter says:

        The GT40 took 3 years to get right, and with a lot of European technology, mostly from Lola.

    2. C63 says:

      Michael Andretti’s arrogance in 1993. I watched sadly as he flew to races and had an attitude of superiority that was disgraceful….

      Disgraceful maybe, misplaced for sure!

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        +1

    3. WSH says:

      “Getting the job done” in F1 is a tough long road. Just look at Mercedes and how Ferrari are struggling.
      I hope with you that Haas and his team will become a genuine F1 contender. It is about time.

    4. super seven says:

      Just how American will this team be? If it’s designed and built in Europe using non US engines, most Americans are not going to be very excited about Haas engineering as a Jingoistic exercise.

      Sauber are Swiss
      Ferrari and Toro Rosso are Italian.
      Despite their claimed nationalities, Red Bull are not Austrian, Marussia aren’t Russian and Force India aren’t Indian. They are designed and built in the UK, just like Mercedes, McLaren, Caterham, Lotus and Williams. I’m sure someone will correct me if I’m wrong, but I think even the Mercedes Power unit is designed and built by what was Ilmor engineering in Brixworth.

      At most, they may be able to promote a US driver. Hopefully one who will make less of a hash of it than Michael Andretti did.

      1. j says:

        So many ifs and assumptions in this post.

      2. Superseven says:

        Comments directly based upon James’ story, specifically quoted below:

        “but a UK base -or at least a European base – is essential from a logistical point of view.”
        hence my comments on the non-US base.

        “Haas is understood to be a customer of Ferrari for engines.”
        hence my comments on the non-US engine.

        Not my assumptions, and given James’ knowledge and experience of F1, I’ll be surprised if the info in his story is not backed up by some inside knowledge of the situation, hence probably not assumptions at all.

        I’m not saying that the two decisions don’t make sense both logistically and financially, but it does significantly dilute the ‘American-ness’ of the team.

      3. Kay says:

        I don’t see a lot of ifs and assumptions but facts in super seven’s post.

        Force India originally set out to become the first Indian team and fully run by Indians, including the drivers. So far it’s still very much UK-based with a lot of UK people that run it. Same goes to Caterham. Red Bull flies the Austrian flag but based in UK. How are these ifs and assumptions?

      4. Robert says:

        Not a whole lot of assumptions. The issue is that the UK Midlands is autoracing’s Wall Street – a pool of talent all in one concentrated area, that allows engineers, designers, electricians, aero experts, CFD computer experts, etc. to move between teams relatively easy when their career progression depends upon it. And that collective talent pool has the experience embodied in it…huge degree of collective experienced that is not available in most other part of the globe. Even when specialised technologies are used in other areas (CFD, simulators, carbon forming, etc.), their specific uses to auto racing are best understood in the UK Midlands, Woking, or Maranello.

        OK, maybe not Maranello these days…and to some degree, that is the problem that Ferrari faces – they only have THEIR small talent pool to draw from, or they have to convince people to re-locate to Italy. For the big-money players, that’s not too daunting. But for your average engineer, or carbon-fibre forming expert, that is just too big a leap, and the pay difference isn’t likely to cover the cost of living expenses to relocate, especially if you have a family. So I put part of the blame for Ferrari’s current struggles to the fact that they mainly have a local talent pool, and not the wider UK Midlands talent pool.

        Woking (McLaren) can draw talent from the Midlands easily – it’s almost commutable if you had to, and frankly many people would love to re-locate to Surrey & Guildford from the Midlands anyway. And moving back to the Midlands for the next job isn’t too difficult, given the appreciation on Surrey real estate…

  14. Iwan says:

    “Currently the Ferrari is the worst performing of the three units in competition…”

    Worse than Renault?

    1. James Allen says:

      Look at the results

      1. Simmo says:

        The results reflect the car performances though, not the engine performance

      2. Andrew Carter says:

        If you think the engine has no impact on the performance then you really don’t know F1.

        Given how slow down the straights the Ferrari powered cars were in Bahrain I think it’s pretty conclusive.

      3. Tony says:

        I think Red Bull’s chassis has something to do with the results, James.

      4. Andrew Carter says:

        The Torro Rosso’s not looking too bad though and their car is increasingly diverging from RB in design philosophy.

      5. justafan says:

        Renault 42 points from 8 cars. Result 5,2 points per engine.
        Ferrari 33 pints from 6 cars. Result 5,5 points per engine.

        Analysis: Ferrari is slightly ahead of Renault in the results.

        That is, unless you ignore that Renault supplies more cars, of course.

      6. Fireman says:

        On average the results say that:
        - Ferrari powered teams have been quicker in qualifying
        - Ferrari and Renault powered teams are tied in driver standings
        - Renault powered teams have more points
        - Ferrari powered teams have completed more laps in races
        - Renault powered teams have had more technical failures

    2. Anil says:

      It’s overweight and struggling to deliver the ERS properly. Maybe come Spain they will leap Renault but the truth is that Ferrari are well behind what they expect.

    3. j says:

      There is an argument there that the poor showing of Ferrari powered cars is not all down to the power unit. If you rated the teams chassis design & aero only it might be that the Renault is being artificially flattered by the Red Bulls level of grip.

      Weigh in on this but I make the chassis list:
      RBR
      Mercedes
      McLaren
      Force India
      Williams
      Ferrari
      Toro Rosso
      Lotus
      Sauber
      Caterham
      Marussia

      1. Stephen Taylor says:

        You have Merc and RBR the wrong way round.

      2. Rednexas says:

        Not sure why you have RBR at number one, Mercedes current dominance comes down to more than just the power units. They very clearly have the best chassis(now)and the evidence is the gap to McLaren, Force India, and Williams. The first two races Mercedes won by roughly 23 seconds over the race distance. In Bahrain it was 23 seconds in 10 laps after the SC, while Nico and Lewis were fighting and should have been slower. They are untouchable at the moment and it’s not just power. They have the whole package.

      3. j says:

        Fair points. I put it in that order because I think the Renault power unit is awful. It’s often unable to run at full power for various reasons and even at full power it is many HP down on the Mercedes. The RBR chassis seems best to me.

        I do agree that the gap between Mercedes and McLaren/Force India/Williams is huge. Much worse than it looks on an ordered list. I only put McLaren 3rd due to the results in Australia but my gut tells me they are even worse in the chassis department than Ferrari.

      4. Kay says:

        Not being an RBR fan, I concur with j on chassis order.

        Despite the engine power deficit, they are still doing a pretty good job, thanks to Newey’s job on the aero front.

  15. Andy says:

    Regardless of what funding they do have, it’s difficult to see how they will be ready for 2015, unless they do buy a team or have significant technical help through a partnership with another.

    1. Matt G says:

      I believe dallahra or another chassis designer will help with the initial design. That will be a big help as they should be more understanding of the fia safety standards and have the infrastructure.

      1. Andy says:

        Perhaps, I’m not sure Dallara will be of much use when it comes to being anything competitive in F1. They are good at what they do, but F1 certainly isn’t one of them.

      2. Matt G says:

        I don’t think they will be ultra competitive for day 1 but they will help the team get to the track and tests quicker

      3. j says:

        Being “good at F1″ is more to do with the ability to test, measure and analyze data and apply that knowledge to successfully improve the car.

        The HRT car might not be the most impressive resume for Dallara but HRT did take that ONE chassis and aero set up built with no testing and raced it at every track from Monaco to Monza.

    2. WSH says:

      It is indeed a very short span to testing in 2015. Current F1 teams have started working on their 2015 contender as soon as the 2014 one made it to the first start. A steep learning curve ahead for them.

      1. Andy says:

        Not only would they have started, but they have the ongoing experience of this year as well. I hope I’m wrong but I would be surprised if they can get within the 107% in the first half of 2015.

    3. Andrew Carter says:

      Caterham did it in 6 months for 2010 and were the best of the new teams that year, so it’s not impossible.

  16. Bobby says:

    Gene Haas knows his alliances very well in motorsport. In NASCAR, his team (co-owned with driver Tony Stewart) is a satellite team of Charlotte auto dealer Rick Hendrick’s powerhouse (winning a championship himself), and it’s very likely that Haas may bring along two of his current sponsors — Exxon Mobil (which already has a technical partnership with McLaren) and InBev.

    Any potential Ferrari alliance team however would probably carry not Ferrari branding but instead Fiat’s US performance and parts brands, SRT and Mopar, respectively.

    Haas CNC has offices in Norwich (UK corporate) and Leicester (engineering), so I would expect Haas SRT would be located in one of those two.

    1. WSH says:

      Getting the right people hired is key. And the best ones are under contract with current teams and they don’t want to risk their careers on a start-up.

      1. Kay says:

        J. Villenueve is a good failed example

      2. WSH says:

        The BAR was too high for them.

        Look at the F1 field now: four F1 drivers from Latin America – well one of them shall not be missed when he leaves – but the other three, and all their predecessors, have shown that F1 is a world sport. Potential USA drivers should wonder why they don’t make it. Perhaps the bar is too high, perhaps they are not really interested in a non-USA sport.
        It would be interesting to see an American team in F1, but it won’t make much of a difference if they don’t make it or succeed.

    2. deancassady says:

      what chance of an american motor manufacturer coming in?

    3. Andrew Carter says:

      Has Fiat brought out Chrysler completely now? Not sure SRT would go with that, they’re not even taking their Vipers to Le Mans this year.

  17. Seán Craddock says:

    It seems crazy to me why the FIA gives such short notice! When you consider a lot of the teams started developing 2014 cars back in 2012. Even with other FIA sports, WRC, WEC, teams are announced, design and build a car, test it for one year and then compete. F1′s so competitive that it’s difficult for new teams to compete. In their 4th season and Caterham and Marussia are nowhere near even scoring points!

    1. Keith says:

      Agree. Look to Honda’s schedule or Suzuki’s in MotoGP. Suzuki is taking all of 2014 to test and develop. Nine months seems overly optimistic. Best of luck to them. It will be a steep learning curve.

    2. Simmo says:

      Their 5th season now! Still too far off though. I remember back in 2012 Caterham were promising points!

    3. Andy says:

      One would think that the FIA would look at the teams technical ability to produce a competitive car in 12 months, not just what finance and plans they have.
      Lotus had a winning car and experience, but are now making it look extremely difficult.

      1. j says:

        Your example is a perfect reason to concentrate on finance and ability to attract sponsorship. Because flow of money is everything.

        Look at “Lotus”. They won a race last year but because their car is covered with their own logos in place of real sponsorship they ran out of money and have no chance of winning anything this season.

        If Haas botches it and doesn’t produce a car in time or misses the 107% rule in every race you will be able to point back to these posts but when they make the top 10 next season I really doubt you’ll have the class to remind us of your predictions.

      2. Andy says:

        I hope they succeed and do make the top 10, but the season Williams had last year just shows how difficult it can be for a well established team with resource and experienced people.
        All I can predict is that if they do struggle, the FIA and BE will do their usual and blame everyone but themselves.

  18. Velvet says:

    They need an experienced F1 driver but the other one needs to be American (Rossi or Daly would be the two obvious ones). While Italy may be fine having no Italian drivers, they do have Ferrari. Having an American team is great, but F1 needs to have an American driver to get any traction in the states.

    1. Rich C says:

      *I’ll do it! And for expenses only!

      Naturally any *American car will be large enough for real people (ie ‘road relevant’), so I’ll be fine with that!

    2. LeeF1Nut says:

      Not a chance in hell.

    3. Simmo says:

      They need two good drivers, not just an American one.

      While I agree with your point, I think it is bad if they go after a driver solely for their nationality.

    4. Random 79 says:

      Marketing.

      That’s like saying that Force India needs an Indian driver.

      They don’t.

    5. UAN says:

      Perhaps Button will move over to Haas when Alonso comes knocking on McLaren’s door?

    6. WSH says:

      “Must have one American driver” only makes things more difficult for them. Where are those potential F1 drivers now?
      Haas should just be a F1 team, that happens to originate in the USA, but they will be soon a European team where it comes to home base, engineers etc., if they take this serious of course.
      And probably drivers can come from all kind of nationalities, but less likely from the USA. When they do well, potential USA F1 drivers will fight for a seat.

      1. Ali says:

        By the time 2015 comes round, Alex Rossi will have been a Caterham test driver for 3 years, GP2 driver for 2 years. He probably needs to make the move to F1 next year anyway or he’ll become like Luca Filippi – too “experienced” at the lower levels for teams to want him. Conor Daly has 3 years of GP3, probably 1 year of GP2, several f1 straightline tests and a Indy 500 under his belt. Compared to what Kyvat had done at the end of 2013, I think they’re ready to go.

        Do they always need to have an America driver? no. But I think it makes commercial sense to have 1 for the first year. Gene Haas may be rich, but I think he’d want sponsors at some point. Having an American might help with that at first, don’t you think?

      2. WSH says:

        Sure it helps a lot if they can get an American driver. Agree on that. I have not followed Rossi’s career, and apparently he might be a good candidate.
        F1 has still a lot of work to do in the USA to build an audience – if that ever will happen – , but Haas’ team might copy Force India’s example, without the mess of the owners of course.

      3. j says:

        The thing about America, easily forgotten for those of us who don’t live there, is that the people on average spend a lot of money and there are a quarter billion of them.

        Look at skateboarding. What percentage of Americans really care about that sport? Only less than half of 1% of the population can ride one but the skateboard industry earns twice as much money per year as F1.

        Get a small percentage of that country interested in this type of racing and it can turn into a billion dollars very quickly. The problem is that there are a thousand really exciting sports to choose from and even if F1 succeeds if they drop the ball for any reason the fans will drop them just as quickly.

  19. Leslie D'Amico says:

    Always love to read the comments whenever Americans contemplate going to F1. All I can say is Gene Haas was not the only group interested in an F1 team recently.
    For those who don’t know, Haas Automation was started in 1983 by Gene Haas. They have expanded a couple of times and now occupy a purpose built factory on an 86 acre property in Oxnard, CA. They manufacture several lines of CNC machine tools and have regional offices in Belgium, China and India. They are ISO and CE certified. Haas Automation products are distributed worldwide through a network of Haas Factory Outlets (HFOs),
    In addition to the Gene Haas Foundation, The Haas Technical Education Center and Stewart-Haas Racing, a division of Haas Automation, Wind Shear Inc. has completed a rolling road wind tunnel (built in 2008) capable of accommodating full size cars. This commercial operation was designed for vehicles from the: stock car, formula one, indy car, drag racing, as well as production car industries.
    While none of this guarantees success in F1 or any other racing series, it appears this man knows how to get things done. With his worldwide presence and financial wherewithal he may have the best shot of any recent American F1 effort.
    There are a number of ex F1 major players sitting on the sidelines right now. Perhaps he can entice a few of them to come out of retirement.

    1. LeeF1Nut says:

      Toyota had all the money in the world and excellent facilities. But couldn’t manage an F1 team to save their lives. It takes more than cash and a few shiny bits if kit to be successful in F1.

    2. Brian Bell says:

      “There are a number of ex F1 major players sitting on the sidelines right now. Perhaps he can entice a few of them to come out of retirement.”

      Mr Brawn will be missing the cut and thrust by then :-)

      1. PhilipB says:

        Now I have hope for us.

      2. Superseven says:

        Hiring Ross would be a major coup.
        I don’t know whether he’d be tempted, but they’ll need someone that good and with that much historical knowledge to get any kind of competitive momentum.

    3. Andy says:

      I don’t think anyone doubts his credentials or ability, but this is something of a unique challenge. Experience and knowledge is vital, the question is can he attract sufficient right people, I doubt it.

    4. Alan H says:

      All of these facilities are all well and good but I haven’t seen any mention of simulators up to now. Is Toyota’s still available or will Haas have to build/acquire/rent one?

      1. j says:

        Simulators are not built by the teams themsleves. All it takes to get one is some money and call up the company that makes them for the other F1 teams.

    5. Darrin from Canada says:

      Perhaps Ross Brawn will be tired of gardening by 2015…

  20. radohc says:

    “Formula 1 will have 12 teams and 24 cars on the grid next season”

    James, will believe when I see it.

    I can imaging there could easily be delay to this project.

    At the same time is there confidence for Marussia or Caterham to be on the grid next year?

    btw. Lotus – if PDSVA pull the plug on some performance clause, will Enstone not fold as house of cards?

    1. Simmo says:

      If I were them I would pull the plug based on not wanting to be associated with that driving standard from a certain Maldonado!

    2. Random 79 says:

      My two cents:

      1. Marussia are getting there. Granted they’re getting there slowly, but at least they are gradually moving forward, unlike certain other teams :)

      2. Big question mark over Caterham. If Tony did pull the plug I wouldn’t be surprised on any level.

      3. Don’t say house of cards in relation to Maldonado – it’s just too tempting to make some kind of joke about it :)

      Besides, I don’t think you can break a performance clause unless you actually have some performance to compare.

    3. Monza 71 says:

      It’s making Maldonado look like a very clever bunny, isn’t it !!!

      Talk about own goal !

  21. Jarv027 says:

    I’ll be surprised if they’re on the grid next year

    1. Michael says:

      I’m an American who loves F1. I will also be surprised. I remember the USF1 debacle.

  22. Joe S says:

    Hopefully they make it to the grid, that is their first main goal and we know its where USF1 couldn’t get to. It’s nice to have a new team but the novelty will have worn off if they’re still around in 4 or 5 years and doing no better than Caterham or Marussia.

  23. Fastfastfast says:

    Good luck to the new team. Now, if they could just get the clothing design company Geoffrey Beene as a sponsor, they’ll have a great future as Haas-Beene Racing.

    1. Random 79 says:

      Lol :)

    2. Jagshemash says:

      Rofl

    3. Robert says:

      You, sir, win the Interwebz today…I almost spit my coffee out.

      1. Fastfastfast says:

        You’re welcome. :)

  24. LeeF1Nut says:

    I have 2 questions.
    1. Where are going to be based?
    You simply can’t do it outside of Europe.
    2. Have you seen Nascar the technology is out of the ark.
    They better hire all current F1 staff or they’ll never qualify.

    1. PhilipB says:

      2. Tell us about your space program.

      1. LeeF1Nut says:

        My point is you can’t ask a group of guys who are used building stock cars to build an F1 car. The technology gap is too big. All the experienced people are in Europe.

        As for the space programme as far as I’m aware the UK is a world leader in satellite design and build not sure on rockets etc but then the US cancelled theirs.

      2. Michael says:

        …and your Silicon Valley.

      3. Torchwood Five says:

        European Space Agency?

    2. Leslie D'Amico says:

      Even though we all gripe about F1 rules it is the rules that make a series. NASCAR rules are what hold back their technology. If NASCAR teams could make parts out of carbon fiber and titanium they would.

    3. Random 79 says:

      I have a better question:

      If Nascar technology is out of the ark then why can’t they drive in the rain?

      1. ferggsa says:

        Because they would need two drivers?

      2. Glennb says:

        That conundrum has stumped scholars for years mate.
        When you figure outthe answer, maybe you can explain to a simple Aussie why the word ‘abbreviation’ has so many letters…

      3. Random 79 says:

        That’s a good question for which I have no good answer, but here’s another one for you that was posed by Stephen Fry a while back:

        Why does the abbreviation for World Wide Web have three times as many syllables?

    4. David Howard says:

      1. Several people have pointed out that Haas has several operations in the UK already. I would imagine he will probably choose one of those as his base. I’m sure he will probably retain some part of the technical staff in North Carolina as their is quite a bit of infrastructure in place (Windtunnel, technical facilities, etc) already in place for his other autosport ventures.

      2. While I am no fan of NASCAR, the technological gap between NASCAR and F1 is not for lack of knowledge but by design. NASCAR is stock car racing, and while the days of good old boys grabbing a frame from the junkyard and souping up an engine are gone that is the legacy that that series follows. NASCAR is not the pinnacle of technological innovation, it is packed racing that emphasizes getting the most out of theoretically equal platforms. If I were Ferrari for example I think I might like to have a few people who can choke that dog to get wring some life out of it.

      3. That said, I hope the rumours of using Ferrari engines are false. With all of the other hurdles they face why give yourself another one? I doubt seriously that the engine itself will draw them Ferrari fans in the states or elsewhere. We just want to have a team of our own and a capable American driver if possible. Can Rossi be lured away from Caterham to a team that is even further behind in development at this point? We’ll see. Keeping my fingers crossed this all comes to fruition.

    5. Grant H says:

      Exactly on actual fact, forget Europe, i cant see how u could start an F1 team away from middle England where 8 of the teams are based. Cant start a F1 team without the experienced tech personnel.

      1. Andrew Carter says:

        Of which there are plenty in America, IndyCar is filled with them.

      2. Grant H says:

        Sorry ur facts are wrong. The tech used in F1 is far more advanced that Indy car. Typical budgets for a team in F1 are greater than 100 million and thats not even a top team , try 200-300 million… Indy cars are stoneage and run on a fraction of the cost. Trust me There is a reason why all teams are in one place!!!

      3. Andrew Carter says:

        Grant, it seems like you don’t know much about Indy Car. For starters there’s no development freeze on the engines there and they do have complex control systems, though granted not as advanced as those in F1.

        My post was pointing out that IC is filled with experience F1 tech PERSONNEL, which is what your post was questioning.

      4. Grant H says:

        I disagree, see below link on autosport, even an experienced IC driver thinks a US base wont work

        http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/113475

    6. RogerD says:

      1. They will be based in the US. No one has successfully done it to date. That’s all you can say.
      2. The ark, as piloted by Russell Crowe, was not powered at all as I recall. NASCAR has deliberately chosen its basic engine technology for myriad reasons, not the least of which is to keep cost under control and stop any one manufacturer spending their way to domination (like Mercedes Benz).
      NASCAR is super professional. They run 40 weekends a year. Even though the cars have the aerodynamics of bricks they’ll do nigh on 350km/h. Yeah, they only turn one way mostly (but they race flat tracks as well) but the speedway idea is for the fans’ benefit – they can see the whole race from one spot in the stands. F1 could learn a lot from NASCAR.
      Haas has a checkbook (sic) so talent won’t be too much of an issue. Rumour has it there are a few bods form Brixworth already signed up.

      1. audifan says:

        bods from brixworth ?
        no way is haas stupid enough to try to start with his own engine

    7. Robb says:

      Yeah, F1 is a lot different than NASCAR. I bet Gene never thought of this.

  25. Rick says:

    I’ll say it.
    Danica. :) !!

    1. David Howard says:

      Bite your tongue. 8O

    2. Andrew Carter says:

      I’ll say it.

      Hell no.

    3. Rich C says:

      That would just blow their minds in the paddock!

  26. bmg says:

    James,what kind of money will be required to set up a team from scratch and how much would an existing team cost to buy?

    1. James Allen says:

      How long is a piece of string?

      To set up £100millions

      To buy? Merc bought Brawn for €123. Brawn bought Honda for £1 and Stoddart bought Minardi for about that but sold to Toro Rosso for a profit

      Marussia or Caterham would be quite a bit less

      1. Random 79 says:

        You could buy Marussia or Caterham for quite a bit less than one pound?

        If I start saving now I could be a team boss by Christmas! :D

  27. German Samurai says:

    I guess it will be USA vs Russia at the back of the field next season.

    This project will fold after 1-2 seasons.

    Running a NASCAR team has as much in common with running an F1 team as running a restaurant.

    1. Michael says:

      @ German Samurai …and how is that going to benefit F1? With teams packing up and leaving?

    2. Andrew Carter says:

      I think the Romanians will shoot you for calling them Russians.

      And plenty of drivers run successful restaurants.

  28. Stan says:

    Many people seem to be concerned about Haas’ ability to build a car. I seem to remember reading here that Haas was planning to get the chassis designed by Dallara. That setup didn’t work very well for HRT but it’d be a start.

    I can’t seem to find the article, can anyone else or am I just imagining things?

    1. Random 79 says:

      Don’t worry.

      There’s the every possibility that your imagination might end up being better than the reality :)

    2. Andrew Carter says:

      The Dallara was a pretty good base, HRT just never paid up for it though so it was never going to get developed.

      1. Kay says:

        The Dallara that HRT had was never good. Someone was brought in, (Pat Symonds or Geoff Willis, or someone, can’t remember) had a look and said it was not up to F1 standard. HRT not paying up was another matter.

  29. Matt G says:

    I’d hope they look to indy for some engineering talent. It would help to gain talent based in the us.

  30. Arnie says:

    its not like they wouldn’t have agreed their engine supplier already. Its almost certainly going to be mercedes . All credit to them for giving it a go .

    1. super seven says:

      Ferrari, according to James’ article.

    2. Andrew Carter says:

      Why would it be Mercedes? If Merc don’t want to supply another team then there’s no chance in hell of getting one.

  31. StevenM says:

    I hope this happens, as I think they make a very good product(I’m a machinist) and I hope the USA finally get our team. I do, however, hope the FIA know about the raid by the FBI, via IRS, that was performed on the Haas headquarters in Oxnard a few years ago, for tax evasion. . I do live in Oxnard, by the way.

    1. Random 79 says:

      Well if they didn’t before they do now :)

    2. audifan says:

      tax evasion ….by F1 standards a mere bagatelle

  32. Elie says:

    Great news for F1 lets hope Haas handles F1 philosophies and epic scale politics. I think its a tremendous pity that Cosworth did not have the capacity for 2014 power units because with a new US owned team that would have made a terrific partnership with opportunities for both to grow. Perhaps even the return of Ford US support with Cosworth.

    The last talk I heard was that Haas would be using Dallara to build the chassis. Im sure Honda has built engines in the Indy series using Dallara chassis so it will be interesting to see if Haas sticks with Ferrari PU given their current woes- Maybe the Honda deal with Mclaren is exclusive too..

    Haas biggest issues will be coordination of resources because of his plants in the US and others all over Europe unless he does a Caterham & puts them under the one roof.. Either way may the force be with you Gene

  33. Occas says:

    From the news article on Formula1.com:

    “The FIA said that other applications “of a high standard” had been received to join the F1 grid and that it is in the process of conducting further investigations for another potential new team, Forza Rossa.”

    Forza Rossa – “Red Force”

    Is it just me or does that sound like a Ferrari number 2 team in the same vein as Torro Rosso?

    Sportpulse suggests it might be a Colin Kolles outfit

    1. Random 79 says:

      Sounds more like a Russian invasion plan to me :)

      1. Rich C says:

        No I think it was a movie…

  34. cometeF1 says:

    Glad to see an American team joining the field. I would have like to see them bring a constructor along, but I suppose the investment required to produce a PU is just too much for that. Haas must be praying that Ferrari greatly improve their unit before the start of next season, as a first season must be problematic enough without having to worry about lacking in the power department. Hopefully, no team will pull out meanwhile as it would be great to have 24 cars on the grid.
    With regards to Honda. Will they be supplying McLaren only next year, or are there rumors of other team teaming with them?
    Anyways, good luck to them and lets hope that they are able to produce a descent car and show a bit of competitiveness. Marc

  35. kenneth chapman says:

    i somehow seem to think that this new team will find it extremely difficult to make any solid impression.

    if they are to be truly an american team then they need to have a large component of the team as generic american otherwise it is just another startup.

    i am certain that they have done due diligence and they wouldn’t be going there if they weren’t confident in being a meaningful presence. which then leads to a conundrum..from where do they operate? obviously they would need, ideally, to be located in the UK but in doing that alongside employing non americam personnel would dilute the ‘american’ flavor.

    i will follow this with great interest as when the USF1 was on the table it seemed as though there may actually be an american team forming. not so as it turned out. a pity, as the americans do have some stunning technology but not in F1.

    1. Random 79 says:

      I can guarantee you any generic American will be a large component of the team :)

  36. forzaminardi says:

    Surely he’s going to buy Caterham/Marussia/Sauber/Force India rather than come up with a whole new entity?

    1. super seven says:

      If that was his plan, he wouldn’t have needed to go through the entry process with the FIA.

    2. Andrew Carter says:

      He would have already have done that by now then.

  37. Paige says:

    Gene Haas knows what he is doing. If anyone can come into F1 from scratch and succeed, it’s him. He’s got the money, and he is a racer who knows what it takes to win.

    The rest of F1 may laugh at him for the NASCAR connections, but NASCAR is every bit as competitive and cutthroat as F1, and running a top level NASCAR team is not exactly a cheap undertaking.

    There is a rumor now that Ford is thinking about coming back to F1. This could be something to look out for in connection with Haas.

    Hopefully we’ll see an American driver in F1 sometime soon. Maybe this is Alexander Rossi’s ticket to the grid?

    1. Elie says:

      Hi Paige, Interested to know where you heard the Ford rumour- re my post above- could their be Ford Cosworth rebirth- that would be tremendous. Its also the right time with synergies between road and race cars becoming more prevalent with these PU and discussions of cost savings now that global economies are coming out of recession.

      I couldnt agree more about Haas- I was a fan of his team when i used to follow Indy & Champ cars a few years back. Definitely if anyone could pull it off- he can. But Like everyone else he will follow the same challenges – Sponsorship because this is what stopped his Champ car aspirations in 2012. Im guessing he would have already a solid business case and long term deals being signed.

  38. Dave says:

    James,
    What s your take on the other mention Forza Rossa. Whilst I’m all for a bigger grid I’m just wondering whether the name may be confusing when put together with toro Rosso

    1. James Allen says:

      It will be a struggle

    2. Neil says:

      Forza Rossa isn’t that Italian for red force? is it just me that detects a faint wiff of prancing horse taking a leaf out of an energy drinks book

      1. James Allen says:

        I can’t see Ferrari allowing a team called Forza Rossa.

    3. Olivier says:

      “Forza Rossa” would only make sense if they were to be based in Italy. Like Torro Rosso does.

      “Haas” is actually Dutch for “Hare”. This could make up for a great logo …

      1. Random 79 says:

        I think Lotus already beat them to that one :)

    4. Torchwood Five says:

      We coped with two Lotus’.

  39. Ant says:

    First off I’m a fan of f1but do not know to much about the details of the sport. My question is hass will be an American team could they not use an American manufactor. I think it would be intresting to see a chevy of ford in f1 and a f1 manufactor like ferrari in nascar

    1. Richard says:

      I doubt they can develop a power unit in just nine months… Merc spent three years developing theirs, Ferrari and Renault probably probably did so too, and they, especially Ferrari, cocked up horribly.

      1. Kay says:

        especially Ferrari? As least theirs ran reliably, despite slowly. Better than Renault’s not running at all, at least in pre-season tests.

      2. Richard says:

        And look where Renault are standing now. They have massively improved, the Italians however…

      3. Kay says:

        Richard, you can’t be certain to say Renault’s improvement of form is down to improvement in power. We all know Newey is an aero genius and any loss in horsepower can be made up by aero efficiency. We still see glitches and problems with the Red Bull cars that are powered by the Renault PU.

        With Ferrari, yes they are slow, but is it purely down to PU problems? Or could it be aero that’s causing problems?

        When Hamilton first joined Merc AMG from McLaren, both powered by the same engines, immediately Hamilton noticed a huge difference in aero which he voiced out, something that Merc seriously lacked. Take a more obvious example, the F-duct McLaren that stalled air vs the non-F-duct featured Merc. Same power unit, huge straightline speed difference.

    2. audifan says:

      afraid the american scene uses non- american equipment eg indy car uses chassis from an italian company and the engines are either british or japanese

      anf companies like ferrari or mercedes in nascar ? am afraid the good old boys that comprise the audience are not exactly the target market for such companies

    3. Andrew Carter says:

      What American manufacturers? GM are on the verge of being sued into oblivion, Chrysler’s being bought up by Fiat (who own Ferrari) and Ford, who might come back, have a well earned reputation of being “a dollar late, a dollar short”.

  40. Howard P says:

    USGP 2.0?

    I jest, I want this to happen. Although the way things are going, I imagine this will split the pack into two groups, i.e. the established teams and the “newbies” – Caterham, Marussia, Haas and the Serbian team that may also be entering.

    1. Joe S says:

      F1 has had two tiers since 2010. The new US team will either join them for a while or be in their own tier.

  41. roberto marquez says:

    James are there any North American drivers with the license to drive in Formula 1 ? If yes who are they ? Thanks for your time.

    1. James Allen says:

      Alex Rossi at Caterham

      Connor Daly will probably be eligible too via GP3 and GP2

      1. Ali says:

        Conor, not Connor. Pet hate.

        Ryan Hunter-Reay would be eligible for a Superlicence due to winning the Indycar championship in 2012. Little old though.

      2. Andrew Carter says:

        I doubt it would take too much to get Josef Newgarden a super license with his IndyCar experience, and I rate him much higher than Rossi and Daly.

  42. paul.r says:

    hope gene haas still has ross braun’s phone number in his speed dial?

    1. Michael says:

      I hope so also

    2. Robert says:

      If he looks, he will probably find it filed under “Brawn”…

  43. Fastfastfast says:

    It doesn’t matter who runs the team, it will still have a Ferrari PU.

    1. Kay says:

      If the aero can make up for the lack of power then they might do a RBR and still be competitive.

  44. StevenM says:

    I dont think money will be an issue, Haas Automation is thriving and there’s a waiting list for mist of the machines, their new UMC 750 5 axis machine has a waiting list of 13 months. Plus I’m sure that lots of people know who Gene Haas is and know what he has done with his business. I’m not saying sponsors will line up, but I think the man knows how to lure them. I wouldn’t be suprised if he has many on board already.
    As far as how hugh of an undertaking it is, Americans tend to underestimate F1. They have a “can do it” attitude and I don’t think that works in F1, you can’t trow money and hours at a F1 car, it’s about more than that. They will need to hire the right people, and like someone already said, most of the ones you want already have contracts. They will need to get lucky with a young, unproven designer, or team of designers.
    Now, tell me if I’m wrong about this next point. Let’s say they can build a car in, let’s say 3 months(too optimistic?), couldn’t they hire the tracks that are in the calendar? They would already have a target lap time, they would know where they need to be and they can test to their hearth content, so perhaps they ain’t be too far behind.
    As far as the engine, or lump like brits call them, I sure as hell hope they don’t choose a new manufacturer, they don’t need that problem. They would be stupid to choose anything other than the Merc. It’s THE platform to run for a new team, it has 0, zero problems.
    Good luck Gene Haas!!

    1. j says:

      An interesting point in there. F1 over recent years has been recycling the same designers from team to team for a while and some of them are getting fairly old.

      Where (or when) is the window of opportunity for a fresh new designer to come in and have the chance to really shake things up.

      1. Rich C says:

        “Where (or when) is the window of opportunity for a fresh new designer to come in and have the chance to really shake things up.”

        Easy one: that would be ‘today’ and in Maranello!

  45. Stephen Taylor says:

    A bit off topic but I thought i’d carry out an experiment . See if you prefer this race linked below to Bahrain 2014. In my opinion it’s irrelevant about the noise, but do you want thishttp://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMjE1NjM1MDg0.html or Sakhir 2014.

  46. Richard D says:

    Let’s hope that this new US team gets its cars onto the grid next year; it would be good to see 24 cars running again. I remember the days when there were 30 cars and only the top 26 qualified to start.

    1. j says:

      I wish we could go back to the days where a small team could buy a car and show up for a single race in their home country and try to make the 107%.

    2. Kay says:

      Imagine Monaco…

  47. Carlos Marques says:

    I still can’t see why having another struggling team at the back of the grid is good for the sport.

    They will be permanently stuck at the far end of the grid with no sponsors in sight and two pay drivers. They will struggle for a couple of years, and then they will fold when the money runs out…

    Yeah, this is good news indeed…

    1. Kay says:

      Never say never. All they need is some bright people.

      RBR wasn’t that good, until Newey came in.

  48. Paul D says:

    Sad thing is we all know this project is going to fail and do nothing. Just like after 5 years for Caterham / Marussia after lots of investment. Barriers to entry in F1 are way too high.

    F1 needs customer cars, then these new entrants may stand half a chance.

  49. Richard says:

    Well, they probably need a Maldanado or two to bring in all the money they need…

    1. Random 79 says:

      They’ll need two Maldonados for sure: One Maldonado to bring in cash for development and the other Maldonado to bring in cash for all the spare parts ;)

      1. Kay says:

        Or Maldonado as team boss, leaving the cars to be driven by proper racing drivers.

        Team orders: RAM THAT CAR IN FRONT! RAM HIM!

      2. Random 79 says:

        Could work, but I still think you’d still need an extra Maldonado to pay for for all the spare parts :)

  50. Ketthalllotus says:

    A US team in F1 can only be a good thing, surely. Imagine if F1 became successful all across The States……..think about the manufacturer interest it would generate. Toyota, BMW, VW/Audi and Nissan to mention a few. Not to mention Goodyear, Michelin and all the sponsors…..Coca Cola, Pepsi etc. The sky would be the limit

  51. Martin says:

    I apologise if I’ve missed it, but isn’t American engineering and aero a bit, well, uniform in the premium series like NASCAR and Indycar. In fact they are quite proud that NASCAR although looking different, have the same aero performance! Is there any base ability to design and engineer individual cars, a basic requirement for F1?

  52. kenneth chapman says:

    it now appears, according to one spokesperson, that the cars will be built and housed in the US at a huge new facility [125000 sq ft, whatever they are ] along with nascars.

    as far as logistics go i’m not sure whether this will work but we will see as it progresses.

  53. OppositeLock says:

    Bernie said in an interview it takes $1 BILLION USD ($1,000,000,000) over four years to run a F1 team! That’s $250,000,000 USD per year at current rates. That is just to run a back of the pack to mid level team. Haas has got the financial might in place to do this. More power to him.

    It would be great to have a US team in F1, hopefully with a US driver to build interest in F1 in the USA.

  54. Glen says:

    24 cars next year? I would put a question mark after Caterham, Murussia and Lotus being on the grid next year.

  55. MR says:

    12th team??. Perhaps Haas will buyout Caterham?? Fernandes has already stated if he comes last again in the battle of the little leaguers he will quit………

  56. Deeppurple says:

    From what He’s told today at the press conference, I feel the “smart” way he talks about “without throwing money at it” is the way of CUSTOMER CARS (Like Moto GP), I cannot see any other way…

    Buy a 1 or 2 year old car (probably a Ferrari), use some NASCAR level engineering and his wind tunnel to enhance performance, and try and leap frog ahead of money spending mid-fielders….

    His aim seems to be to sell the Haas name make money out of this venture….

    If this happens, it would be against the spirit of F1….which is all teams however small are to build their own cars….Will hurt a lot of egos…

    1. Random 79 says:

      He can’t use a year old Ferrari because there’s not a chance in hell it would meet the new regulations…unless you mean buy a year old Ferrari from this year, in which case there’s not a chance in hell that it would be competitive :)

      I think every team owner who enters F1 is looking to make money from it to some degree, but I think very few actually do and though I wish Haas luck I’d be surprised if he was any exception.

      1. Deeppurple says:

        He will have to start somewhere…given his position, even a 1-year old car tweaked for modern rules should be enough to start on…at least his minions will understand how the civilised world designs a race car ;)

        Whichever method he uses, I dont think he will move away from “just purchase and race” philosophy…whether its an old car or a summ of parts (back end, systems etc..)….HI smain aim is not engineering excellence..its just selling the Haas name…

        This approach is different to Marussia or Caterham, as they still design and manufacture their parts…chassis, suspensions, aero..theyve had to learn to come up to this level, however low compared to the leaders…

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