F1 World Champion 2014
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Ferrari calls for feedback from fans on the new Formula 1 spectacle..or lack of it
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Posted By: James Allen  |  20 Mar 2014   |  6:08 pm GMT  |  403 comments

Ferrari has launched an online mini-survey, seeking fans’ views on the new F1, as we saw it in Melbourne last weekend.

There are four simple questions, relating to whether fans enjoyed the spectacle in Australia and the clarity of the rules.

The survey can be accessed by clicking on this link: Ferrari Fan Survey

We strongly advise readers to take advantage of this opportunity to feed back to one of the leading teams.

As well as disappointment that the drivers have to manage the cars’ fuel consumption, giving the impression that they are not pushing to the limit, there has been a significant backlash from many fans against the sound of the cars, not necessarily the quality of the sound, but the lack of decibels; it was far too quiet for many fans’ taste. There is also dismay that complicated rules relating to fuel flow metering cast a shadow over the event with the disqualification of one of the leading runners.

But it is always risky to jump to conclusions based on a single event. Melbourne was perhaps not the ideal place to launch the new F1 as it is one of the highest fuel consumption races of the year and it doesn’t have corners with more than one line into and out of them, which means it is hard to overtake. There will be a lot more overtaking in Sepang next weekend with the two consecutive straights, linked by a hairpin.

There are a number of suggestions at large in F1 insider circles about improvements, from boosting the sound in the world TV feed to shortening the races this season, as the technology evolves, by around 40km so drivers can push throughout.

Former Benetton and Renault team principal Flavio Briatore launched a scathing attack on the sport yesterday in the Italian media, saying,

“You can’t present a show like we saw on Sunday; it says you don’t respect the public which is paying in the stands and on TV. I didn’t understand what the drivers were doing; they weren’t attacking I didn’t understand the fuel saving, why some great drivers were not able to defend themselves. It was a confusing and depressing spectacle.”

Briatore said that the sport had made a grave error in letting the engineers design the sport, rather than taking a wider view of what would make for the best spectacle.

Meanwhile Mercedes boss Toto Wolff has said that the sport and its teams need to take heed of the views of fans.

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403 Comments
  1. AlexD says:

    My only feedback to Ferrari is that they are completely wasting the talent of alonso and kimi as for many years already they cannot design a winning car!

    1. Gaz Boy says:

      Here here!
      Those pesky “garage teams” (actually, cutting edge high tech manufacturing facilities as Ron Dennis would say) from Britain, the same British who bombed the original Ferrari workshops to dust, are yet again getting the Italian Stallion by the throat and giving it a good kicking.
      This is a just a smokescreen I think.

      1. David in Sydney says:

        Haven’t Italian car electronics always been a bit dodgy..?

      2. Otto says:

        That’s strange, I’m sure I saw two Ferrari finish the race on Sunday, and I think I saw only one Red Bull and only one Silver Arrow finish.
        Far too much anglo saxon bias on this site or maybe jealously of Italians.
        What do you think James?

      3. Arnie S says:

        +1

      4. Arnie S says:

        BTW what about British “Lucas” electrical systems – Lucas, the man who invented darkness

      5. aezy_doc says:

        Hey Otto, how many teams are based in Britain again? If F1 has a nationality, it’s British. (What have I set myself up for with that statement?!)

      6. grat says:

        All the cars are running a McLaren ECU.

      7. Otto says:

        Arnie,
        yes you right,our Mr Lucas was known as the ‘Prince of darkness’ I believe

    2. W Johnson says:

      So Ferrari would benefit from rule changes allowing more fuel consumption, if as it has been reported that their new engine is a real guzzler!

      1. Paddy says:

        Not much of a survey. What do they hope to gain from that they don’t already know??? Formula is boring… Until you bring a budget cap and level out the playing field it will always have problems…

      2. Save F1 says:

        More equitable distribution of the TV money would help the sport. Keeping it a sport would help the sport too. Want to help return F1 to its roots? Make sure our collective voice is heard. Not sure yet how that will happen, but if we garner enough support, we’ll figure it out.

        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Save-F1/423551871114942

      3. rad_g says:

        Everyone would benefit. No?

      4. Michael Powell says:

        Lets face it, if Flavio said the moon was round, nobody would believe him. We all know what methods he uses to respect Formula 1 and the public.

        As for Ferrari, when they are winning, we will respect their ideas and their suggestions for improving the spectacle. Meanwhile, they should, I suggest, concentrate on the task in hand.

        It was always thus, the also-rans would prefer the game changed to make it easier. Life is as it is.

    3. Denis 68 says:

      While I agree with your comment, Alonso can always leave if he’s unhappy and why did Kimi even return to Ferrari after the treatment he received last time.

      1. J Hancock says:

        For Alonso, where would he go? Vettel probably had a ‘No Alonso’s’ clause in his contract, I’d bet so does Hamilton and with Ron back in charge Mclaren probably has a ban on anyone with eyebrows over a certain thickness.
        .
        As for Kimi, great big wheelbarrow loads of money.

      2. C63 says:

        Mclaren probably has a ban on anyone with eyebrows over a certain thickness…

        lol.
        Possibly not so far from the truth either :-)

      3. Tealeaf says:

        Actually it’s widely acknowledged Alonso veto’d Vettel’s Ferrari move for 2012, Seb is too fast for Alonso and with the consistency to match I can’t see how Alonso can beat him unless team orders were issued.

      4. Dave C says:

        Treatment? Paid £20million to not do anything for a year is not what you would call being treated bad. Anyway I’d love to see Raikkonen put up a fight against Alonso.

      5. Steve Zodiac says:

        Why is everyone arguing about Ferrari,Aloso and Kimi? I thought the article was about the lack of spectacle (nothing exciting in seeing who can get the most miles per gallon) and aural excitement. It may still be faster but it all seems a bit tame now. Why have the FIA systematically removed all the “spectacular” bits from F1 (ie V12′s, V10′s, 20,000 RPM, Sparks from skid plates, huge flames ans 1200 bhp from the last turbo era, and of course all the mind blowing sound). I am interested by the high tech but the racing now leaves me cold. Maybe they should leave all this Prius stuff to Lemans where it is much more relevant.

      6. john3voltas says:

        Completely agree with Steve Zodiac.
        I can’t believe that JT is making the exact same mistakes of his predecessors.
        Simply unbelievable.
        For the 1st time in 35 years of watching F1 I am considering drop watching my favorite sport :(

      7. Elie says:

        Both Kimi and Fernando have been there & done that including Renault/ Lotus &Mclaren. For Fernando theres Red Bull but then theres a 4 time WC that dont want competition ( incl Kimi) and Mercedes have a rock solid pairing and Yes – a german driver… So really Kimi and nando do t have too many choices..

        As for Kimi going back to Ferarri- lets see Lotus dont pay a cent even when he put them on the map & Ferrari paid him $51m to not drive at all — yeah a real tough choice wasnt it

      8. Pat Palozzi says:

        He left with millions in his pocket(poor Kimi)

    4. John says:

      You are so right. It hurts to see Alonso always 5th on the grid and struggling for podiums. It is never a level playing field. As you say Ferrari have been wasting their time. Bad wind tunnel for years and now they have a good wind tunnel they go and design the ugliest car in F1 (for the last three decades). I don’t get it.

      1. Pat Palozzi says:

        Totally agree

    5. Sri says:

      Yes, they should be more worried about their car than F1 in general. Can they give a survey about their team also?

    6. Ahmad says:

      I agree with you. They actually took Raikkonen as an insurance policy when they saw that Alonso would jump to another team (RBR in this instance when his manager met Horner) for a chance to have a decent car.

      Ferrari were supposed to benefit from the new era where a works team is supposed to be advantaged. But they have fallen behind 3 Mercedes-powered teams and are still behind RBR.

      Raikkonen will be happy to stay because he knows he’ll get paid at least, but I don’t see Alonso hanging around for long, although there doesn’t seem to be much opportunity at the Mercedes-powered teams.

      Until Ferrari are allowed to use their race track for as often as they want or lest they hire Newey, it doesn’t seem plausible for Ferrari to have a dominant car again. Their best years are behind them, as the competition is just too good and getting better all the time.

      Even if Alonso felt betrayed by Dennis, he made the biggest mistake of his life when he alienated McLaren in 2007, and that’s why he doesn’t care any more about Ferrari and is most probably on his way out of there.

      1. James Allen says:

        Ron told me he would have Alonso back

        But I can’t see Alonso putting himself in that position again, especially as Ron now has another blue eyed boy in Magnussen!

      2. Ahmad says:

        Well, like you said about Ron, Alonso really wants to win, and I am sure he will not make the same mistake again. I think he never expected Hamilton to be this good from the get go while it took him half a season to reach his peak form, and then he didn’t expect Ron to let them race. Ron would have happily kept both drivers had Alonso accepted Ron’s decision, and he may have actually won in 2007 or 2008.

        I can bet that if Ron gives a seat to Alonso next year, he would happily accept it, as he would know full well what to expect this time. It has been 8 years since his last title, he is getting desperate.

        I would expect Jenson to be the likely candidate to leave.

      3. Dave C says:

        Ron knows in hindsight he made the biggest mistake in backing Hamilton over Alonso. If he ordered right from the start for Hamilton to play the supporting role then Mclaren would probably have the 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2012 championship from Alonso and maybe even Hamilton would be a better driver now if he had been more humble inatead of everything getting to his head and started to believe in his own hype. Ron Dennis knows all this and wants to make ammends to Alonso and I don’t blame him. I doubt Alonso would return unless he geta guaranteed number 1 status and a championship winning car from this year. Mclaren had better start making this car into a race winner as soon as possible.

      4. Voodoopunk says:

        “Well, like you said about Ron, Alonso really wants to win”

      5. Voodoopunk says:

        @Ahmad

        “Well, like you said about Ron, Alonso really wants to win”

        Wow, cause no one else wants to do that?

      6. Elie says:

        Very interesting James, If he Ron is serious, I think that leaves Jenson seat up for grabs in 2015, but risky ground for the new Honda powerplant for any WC to make the switch.. But if Ferrari keep going nowhere..Its an obvious choice isnt it.!

      7. Krischar says:

        James do you really think Magnussen is as good as lewis?

        Really kevin drove a fantastic race in melbourne where he outpaced jenson all weekend yet the pace differential between kevin and jenson was very little. Alonso can easily handle K.magnussen

        However i do not see the Alonso-Mclaren combination as possibility anytime in the near future.

        My only worry is (Alex.D) pointed out here, Ferrari have wasted alonso’s talent for nothing in the last few seasons and the time is running out now for our Legend (Alonso) to bag another WDC. F14 T looks aweful and it does not look like challenger. Lewis or Nico for 2014 WDC

      8. H.Guderian (ALO fan) says:

        “Ron told me he would (LOVE) have Alonso back”

      9. David in Sydney says:

        Alonso to Williams, red Bull or WEC once he has a mid year de-brief with Webber.

    7. Rod says:

      I completely agree with you. Instead of this silly poll Ferrari should be working of their thirsty, heavy engine instead.
      Who cares how the engines sound anyway. It pains me more that I’m going to see Alonso’s talent wasted for a 5th year in a row.

    8. Bru72 says:

      Unfortunately they let Aldo Costa leave for Mercedes. He designed Ferrari’s last championship winning car, and now look at the Merc!

    9. franco petrella says:

      I think the Fia are overcomplicating the sport. They should never have mandated power unit technology. Just fill the cars up with 100kg of fuel and leave it to the engine suppliers to come up with the best combo. IE, pistons, rotors, two stroke , four stroke,. six stroke naturally aspirated, forced induction, the possibilities should have no regulatory limitations.

      1. Mhilgtx says:

        + 1000

  2. At last says:

    F1 has gone too far this year…..hurts to say it, but it is wrong on many levels.

    1. Dave C says:

      If you want feedbacks here’s a few:
      1. Somehow please bring back the signiture F1 noise!!!
      2. Get rid of these ugly nose!
      3. No team orders.
      4. Bring back the tyre war
      5. We need 1000bhp or more and 240mph at Monza.

      1. Ahmad says:

        Sorry, but:
        1. don’t see the point of becoming deaf.
        2. Yes, I find most of them ugly but it’s safer.
        3. What’s the point since a ban is unforceable and even Ferrari will not apply it this year.
        4. What’s the point of that? We’ve had enough of the tyres playing too big a role over the last few years. Let’s give engine manufacturers an opportunity to make a difference.
        5. Don’t worry, the cars will be very fast this year.

      2. Timmay says:

        1 wrong
        2 wrong
        3 wrong
        4 wrong
        5 wrong

      3. Paul C says:

        The F1 engine noise is magical without it you cannot call this a F1 and reading your comment about Ferrari and so on you clearly understand very little about F1.
        I will no spend one penny to see this shamble.
        Little by little the real F1 is going baste to dust. Long gone are the real battle of the drivers. Carry on to pay fortune for tickets make them extra rich what you get is rubbish.
        This is my opinion and regarding engines why do the English so involve with F1 have no one engine of they on to compare with others in F1? I admit that the McLaren chassis are the best for years now but this is all. UK needs Germans and the only team who need no one around for parts is Ferrari and probably Mercedes do you think this is nothing? and do not even talk about Ron Dennis because what he did was unforgettable for the world very low?

      4. grat says:

        Not entirely sure the noses, as implemented, are safer. We’re going to see a lot more cars going under other cars due to the low tip and long slope featured on most of the cars.

      5. BritishRacingGreen says:

        I don’t think it’s safer, there’s a much higher chance of a car going under another one now, it almost happened with Kobayashi and Massa in the first race. I think it’s as equally dangerous.

      6. Formula Zero says:

        I miss the sound of V10 & V8, I miss refueling, miss tyre wars between manufacturers, but we F1 fans get used to with everything. I am at Albert park every year, sometimes I can’t afford grand stand & get ground pass instead. This year I had to get ground pass & let me tell you, the lack of noise from the 2014 F1 cars are by far the worst thing I experienced ever! I work close to Albert Park & I could usually hear the sound from my work on Friday. But this year I thought the Friday practice was cancelled because I couldn’t hear a thing from work on Friday. I understand the noise pollution affects the environment significantly, affects the productivity of domestic animals & most of all produces huge carbon emission in the atmosphere. I don’t want to listen to the sound from my bedroom everyday or my children to be affected in future any way. So, I accept the fact that I will get used to with it like everything else that changed in last 25 years that I have been following F1. Having said that, I want to experience the sound of thundering F1 cars, flat out racing without any fuel restrictions or heavy tyre ware at least one weekend that I’m at the track. Based on that, I feel like I deserve the money back for my ground pass this year. For people like me, that’s not what I paid for.

      7. Baron says:

        To Paul C: English (you mean British don’t you?) Engines: How about Mercedes?
        Lineage: Cosworth>Ilmor>Mercedes>Brixworth (England)

        Fixed that.

      8. Sujith says:

        Don’t you think the last point is the most irrelevant of all? Come Monza we will have eye watering speeds on these cars anyway!

    2. Ahmad says:

      Easy to criticize but what do you propose?

      Keep the status quo and let RBR win by a country mile?

      At least, Mercedes’ engine advantage is shared with 3 other teams, and RBR is in the mix.

      The changes are really good as they are more road-relevant. Not everything is perfect, but give it time.

      1. Formula Zero says:

        The technology in F1 has always been road related Ahmad. I just want my sound back & flat out racing. I don’t want FIA to force people to listen to the garbage we heard. Fans opinion should matter. It seems FIA doesn’t care!

      2. Sasidharan says:

        Yes, Now Merc wins by a country mile. Most of the TV coverage is a midfield Ferrari fight with Force India and former Minardis.

      3. kenneth chapman says:

        ‘they are more road relevant’ !!!! F1 should be about racing first and foremost and if there is anything that can be hoovered up for road cars then that would be a benefit.

        personally i couldn’t care less about the trickle down tech. the car firms are doing this anyway regardless of F1. all that has been done so far is to spend hundreds of millions of $$$ for what?

      4. Lawrence says:

        And without a focus on relevant technology, how do you propose to get manufactures to spend money on the sport? You have no response to either the companies that were threatening to quit or the fact that another has now committed to join.

      5. kenneth chapman says:

        @ lawrence… i have no response to companies threatening to quit??? what are you babbling on about? i would suggest that you read my post again then have a think about it.

        most manufacturers have massive amounts of investment and people working full time to bring new developments to the road car industry. if you think that F1 is a guiding light then think again. as i said, if there are any new benefits then they will acquire them as one would expect.

        all the FIA has done is neuter the racing. yes, it will improve but it needs to do a lot more to restore the passion. just my opinion.

    3. NickH says:

      I fully agree, they don’t realise what they have actually done. For the first time ever I also fully after with Briatore

      1. Jim says:

        The sound is terrible. Awful.
        I don’t understand why there are so many apologists for it when almost everyone in the sport whom is allowed an opinion says it is rubbish.

        80% of the atmosphere to a TV viewer is the sound, that wail, then trailing off as it passes….They sound like volvo diesels with a little extra turbo and a misfire.

        If the sound wasn’t so pivotal to F1, why do all the TV trailers heavily feature the sound of an F1 car? Sky coverage was playing the sound of an old F1 car.

        If it’s so great, why don’t TV ads/coverage reflect the sound of these hairdriers on their lead-ins or trailers?

        I have 3.2L, V8 BMW and it is a more pleasant sound, honestly.

      2. Lawrence says:

        Oh no, they sound more like diesels. That sound has so damaged La Mons, oh wait, people love those cars.

      3. NickH says:

        *agree

  3. Bob says:

    Social engineering has no place in F1. I get that fuel efficiency is a good thing, but this is silly. Get rid of the fuel flow restriction and add enough more fuel to allow drivers to race the full distance. Fuel efficiency should have some reward, but should not be the deciding factor.

    1. Grant H says:

      I agree and disagree

      Social engineering does have a place in f1 since it sells marketing eg what engine mfr other than ferrari want to make v10′s

      I agree it should bot solely be about fuel saving

      Needs to be a happy medium

      1. Grant H says:

        *spelling ‘not’

    2. RobertS says:

      agreed, I like the technology on the new engines and find it interesting. But the restrictions placed on them such as fuel and fuel flow just limit what could of been. Maybe a stepped reduction in fuel loads would of worked better. So 150kg for the first year then 125kg and so on. Also would of liked to see more development on the engines throughout the year

    3. Castor says:

      Agree completely. Engineering finesse needs to be coupled with an equal quantity of savagery.

    4. Ahmad says:

      Sorry Bob, but there are restrictions for almost everything now: tyres, test mileage, CFD, wind tunnel usage, etc… so what’s wrong with a fuel limit?

      It’s not only about saving money, but it’s about sending a big message around the world that you can drive 300kms in 90 minutes with just 100kg of fuel.

      Social engineering has a big place in F1, as F1 should not only be the pinnacle of motorsport and speed, but also innovation and advanced technology that can become inspire and be road-relevant.

      1. rad_g says:

        That’s the point “300kms in 90 minutes with just 100kg of fuel”, not shorter. Bad for advertisers!

    5. David in Sydney says:

      The sport will actually sort out the fuel issue without resorting to fuel limits or fuel flow meters.

      Consider this:

      Less fuel = less weight = better setup = faster car. The car with the maximum power on minimum fuel with the best aero will have the best chance of winning therefore it is in the teams interest to achieve the best fuel efficiency v power output.

      I say that the engine specifications (wow they are amazing engines now) take care of the green issue; the FIA should stop over regulating and free up fuel rate and capacity rules.

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        “I say that the engine specifications (wow they are amazing engines now) take care of the green issue; the FIA should stop over regulating and free up fuel rate and capacity rules.”

        This makes so much sense to me.

      2. Bob says:

        Agree completely. My point above.

  4. Sebee says:

    I’m always a huge supporter of ‘wait and see’ and ‘give it a chance’. But that youtube video of the guy who recorded the cars go by in 2013 and 2014 from same track point on same camera simply floored me. I could not believe what I was hearing. The F1 sound is a trademark, and someone obviously missed that point. That sound was ribeye steak. Now it’s beef flavoured tofu.

    I see that as the biggest problem, and one that can’t be solved easily and quickly. I think the racing side of things will evolve as soon as teams stop to tip toe and go all out. I gather there was some reserved approaches to Melbourne due to the feeling that there would be a big DNF count and potential for a good finish was on the cards for many teams.

    1. MISTER says:

      +1 agree with you completely.

      Here’s the youtube link for those which might be interested.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS4Dh_EAfJI

      1. aveli says:

        how about the v12s and v10s, did they not sound better? i pike the new sound and i like the idea of harvesting and reusing energy which would otherwise go to waste. i hope they can design generators into the brake pads to harvest some of that energy wasted in the brake discs.
        ferrari are trying to use politics and spoiling tactics because they can smell defeat.
        too late monte.

      2. Nick says:

        I like those things too. What I don’t like is spending big dollars to go and watch the premier motorsport event in the country to find that that the cars don’t fill you with excitement or passion and finding yourself wanting to go home and watch the race on TV.

        Without DR been their to support I wouldn’t have even gone back on the Sunday. It wasn’t worth the money or the hassle to experience F1 live this year.

      3. j says:

        This is what they really sound like:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJnTBiLEHR0

        Funny how the FOM world feed or “fans” doing a comparison video (trying to make a few bucks off of ad placement) can’t get the sound right when a guy with an iPhone can capture it perfectly.

        It’s really sad to me that these people who have already decided they hate “hybrid” or whatever will go to these lengths instead of just letting the real fans hear the real sounds of these cars.

        I watched on the BBC and it was pathetic but they get their audio from the world feed and who controls that? Everyone who watched FP1 and FP2 noticed the sound difference between practice and qualifying. Someone lowered the level, someone EQ’d and muffled the sound.

        I love the racing of F1, I love the characters and drivers who have a life and speak their mind, I love the technology of F1. I could do without the politics and double-talk and everything else.

        F1 is an amazing sport, high technology mixed with bravado and skill and intelligence and athletic ability. But at the same time it’s a sport where the media still runs out to quote people like Flavio, a proven cheater and liar.

        Love and hate of the whole sport is what makes it great I guess.

      4. WSH says:

        Thanks for this link! Sounds much much better than on TV. The coughing, rumbling, high pitched sound of the turbo, the thunder; it is all there! But I do miss the higher revs.

        So the question is more for the FOM: Why can’t you or won’t you to have the real car sound come through on the TV channels?

        And also for the TV-stations themselves. Here, in Chile, I have to use Fox Sport with commentators mainly from Argentina, and as these guys comment from the studio and not from the trackside, the sound levels from the track are always very low and the voice levels too high. The commentators like to discuss between each other, send greeting from friends all over the place, instead of letting the cars do the talking.
        I noticed, when visiting another country that the BBC track sound level (2009) was much higher than with Fox.

        Having said all that just this: I once visited a GP in Spa (1991). Getting out of the car somewhere far off the track we could hear the scream of some F1 cars getting around. It made us want to get to the track asap! When watching the pre-race shows with older cars and sport cars, it was nice. But when the first F1 car came along we were dumbfounded: Blasting, massive sound from just a single car. We quickly arranged ear protection as – being new bees – had never thought it would be that loud and it made the “other race cars” look silly. A unique experience, burned into my memory and can still draw a smile on my face, +20 years later. F1 cars should be high-tech beasts as if from another planet and driven by the very best.

      5. Sebee says:

        WSH…there for Schumi’s debut. You lucky dog!

      6. darren w says:

        Thank you for the link. That video and others like it are the perfect rebuttal to the garbage being spewed by BE. There is nothing wrong with F1 with cars that sound that good.

        It’s about time we started to get some push back on the really bad job FOM are doing presenting the sport. If microphone technology is beyond the grasp of the people at FOM then their contract to promote the sport should be revoked on the basis of simple incompetence.

      7. Steve C says:

        Well J you and others obviously have bad hearing as the link you have placed still sounds pathetic compare with last year’s cars. As for high technology it’s a good job they don’t design and make planes. They would be falling out of the sky all the time. It’s now just car manufacturers playing around with “green” rubbish under the name of a sport and they expect people to watch it.

      8. IgMI says:

        Cannot escape but notice that most of the people in 2013 had protective earphones over their ears, while in 2014 there was none. I can argue that you could hear more in 2014 with naked ears than in 2014 with a muffler over them. What is the point of going to a race to “enjoy” a sound when you have to protect your ears to “enjoy” it.

        For me I loved the old sound but I love the new one as well. Without those extra decibels I can HEAR MORE, not just an engine screaming (love those turbos on downshift and tire squeal).

        Talking about the terms like flat-out racing, maximum power, pushing the limits, etc. all those apply to this new era of F1. The parameters have changed (they are now closer to reality of car industry, although still far enough from it not be be just an ordinary car race) and now teams how to come with new ways to race.

        If you only go in for the sound and speed, why not attach rocket boosters to cars. There would be a lot of earth thundering, but, hey, don’t forget to plug your ears or you may loose your hearing soon enough.

        For me F1 has been, in addition to sound and speed, a technology innovator, a strategy game and an endurance race. That is why I watch it, and that is why I tend to rate it based on the whole season not one race.

        (If they would just get rid off those high-profile tires and go with something more relevant to what is on the road and not on farming fields that would be even better – but not complaining of that too much).

      9. aveli says:

        dinosaurs were spectacular creatures but they became extinct. now more efficient creatures exist and things will continue to change or shall if say change will keep coming.

    2. Folkdisco says:

      I have never been to a race, too expensive. I’ve seen a couple of days of testing at Jerez in early ’09, which was great. I’m probably going to get some hassle for this, but the V8s used to sound a bit like high pitched hairdryers! The deeper V6 turbos sound good to me on telly, but the people in charge of the audio mix just need to turn the feed up. All, of course, IMHO!

      1. Nick says:

        The sound on TV is good. But live they sound silly. I was at the 1st chicane and you can’t even hear them coming down the straight.

      2. Sebee says:

        Does that youtube video convey the experience accurately?

      3. Sebee says:

        Walker retired.
        Bernie is talking about retiring.
        You’re talking harshest language yet about the sound.

        Is this a giant conspiracy theory to “break” F1 only for the sake of breaking it, so that someone (Bernie’s replacement) can come along and “fix it”?

    3. Matthew says:

      Got a link ?

    4. Phil says:

      It’s very different and people are resistant to change, but as to whether it’s good or bad I think we probably do need to ‘wait and see’. I think Ed Gorman summed it up well in his blog a few days ago when he said: “They are also a lot more interesting in the sense that you can hear much more about how the car is performing with the new cars – the engine note, the gear changes, the screech of lock-ups. You can also hear ambient noise around the cars…”

      I’d have to say I found it rather refreshing listening on TV, but I can totally understand that those listening next to the track would find the change massive.

      1. Sebee says:

        Turn down Pavarotti so you can hear third violin? I don’t think so!

      2. Esteban says:

        +1000

      3. tank says:

        Great comment. Well put!

      4. PaulG says:

        Or Listen to Pink Floyd through a Dansette with the volume turned down! Just Wrong!

      5. Voodoopunk says:

        @PaulG

        Switch off Pink Floyd and put on the Dead Kennedys or Black Flag.

      6. Look, I was there and have now had some time to calm down after being infurated by such a bad show. To those saying that the sound is not important – try listening to the commentary of a sport (let’s use football/soccer) – does the game seem more exciting when listening to a mono-syllabic, unimpassioned, even-toned commentator or does the flamboyance and excitement of a Brazilian commentator announcing a “goooooooaaaaaaaaaalllll” come through to make the game seem more exciting?

        The Porsche Carrera Cup and V8 Supercar support categories were infinitely more exciting than the main show of F1 at Melbourne. So why is it that the V8 Supercars put on a more exciting show when it was a non-championship event for them versus the opening round of the F1 championship with everything to play for?

        My view is that it is down to a couple of things – the vast performance differential across the F1 field that strung them out quickly and enabled very few close fights and the fact that from lap 2 they weren’t “racing” in the conventional sense but is was a race to see who could win in the slowest time saving the most fuel and engine parts. Dull, dull, dull, dull, dull.

        The sound the new F1 cars make would be quite acceptable if they were consistently using all of their rev range and driving hard (as were the Porsches – whose sound on full throttle is quite similar to the F1s – and V8SCs) and they were more bunched up. Having a single car come past every 4 or 5 seconds on 2/3rds throttle, mis-firing and not sounding stressed does not make for an event that gets your hairs standing on end. The V8s achieved that merely by firing up an engine (as happened during the ultimate speed comparison demonstrations).

        Sure – try and improve efficiency but when that means the drivers only drive hard for the first 2 laps then cruise then it is an epic fail. Yes, the driver’s appeared to be driving hard due to some twitchiness in the corners but that is because they were trying to carry more corner speed than they used to with less downforce so that they didn’t have to sacrifice fuel accelerating into the next straight. I know they are trying to urge caustion at making too many decisions based on only one event but what occured was exactly as I predicted would occur so the result is that they have produced a show not worth watching, which I won’t be until I read on James’ site that the rules have been revised. Isn’t it a shame that I would rather read about the sport every now and again rather than watch it?

      7. Sebee says:

        Your comment about commentary reminds me of something.

        I remember on a few occasions the ITV or BBC commentary feed would drop off. At that time the local presenters would keep the video with track side audio going until commentary could come back. Whenever it happened it made the experience like being at the track. You could hear the engines of course, which was amazing, the echos as someone was on the other side of the track, the megaphones at trackside announcing something in Italian, or Portuguese, or French. It actually made me comment on a number of occasions how F1 broadcasters should offer the option to viewers to eliminate the commentary and give us just the track side ambient audio on Seconday Audio Program feed – because that’s how beautiful the sound was with those V10s or V8s. It never happened of course. But could today’s F1 stand up to that test – no commentary, track side audio only?

        As for your other comment, well, many predicted that the favorite line of last year “racing to a delta” with tires, would shift to racing to a delta with fuel this year. We are 1 race in, and it is a high fuel consumption race, so we have to wait and see. But it appears that we will have this happen this year.

      8. aveli says:

        interesting but I thought you followed the build up to the start of the season so you knew about the lack of noise and yet you describe your emotions as infuriated? am planning to watch at least two races live this season.

      9. Sebee says:

        aveli,

        I didn’t listen to anything and didn’t see any testing or clips off season. I did not listen to teh bench sound back lst year because that never sounds the same. I remember this F1 popup book that came with a CD of F1 sounds and the bench tested engine (V12 I think it was on the CD) sounded nice but dulled and buffered, not like they sound at the track, with the sound bouncing all over the place free to linger around like a fart.

        Anyhow, I didn’t want to judge it until the product was final. Melbourne was the final ready product in competition, and that was the time to judge and pass the final verdict.

      10. bmg says:

        I could not agree more.FIA have sold out to the manufacturers.
        Sure go to 1.6 ltr turbo but that should have been it.
        After all its not a sport if you don’t have fans.

      11. ManOnWheels says:

        Sebee: Since you were so passionate about the natural sound, you could watch onbards, sometimes even a whole race on the same car without commentary on pay-TV, here is what it was like:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72ITS_rYisw
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5Wg7Xfkg90

      12. Sammy says:

        I’ve read somewhere a few days ago:

        Porn without sound is still porn.

        However, I do miss the screeming engines and the high revs.

    5. Truth or Lies says:

      OMG, I just watched the video. Totally unacceptable, this is not F1, its not even Indy Car, its like the BTCC, but without the action.

      I can’t believe the media have played this down so much, constantly saying the sound isn’t bad its just different. It’s not different it’s just awful there is no volume, so bass, no nothing.

      Who’s going to fork out hundreds of EURO to buy tickets for a GP to, to listen to these tin cans whistling past. At least in a boring race of old and I’ve attended a great many of those, the sound was awesome and even the Minardi’s passing by at 200 MPH were amazing.

      Shame on all involved, especially the media for not accurately reporting this shambles. Its a complete stitch up.

      1. Dave C says:

        You’re right its a shambles please bring back the high pitched scream! Maybe get rid of the turbos and rev these engines to 22,000rpm. Then introduce a bigger exhaust as well that should do it.

    6. Esteban says:

      Link to the video please?

    7. Kurt says:

      F1 2013 vs 2014 sound comparison – Melbourne: https://youtu.be/jS4Dh_EAfJI

      The cars “appear” to be slower too due to the lack of noise!

    8. LeeF1Nut says:

      Totally agree. That youtube video is a masterpiece. The thrill of hearing those engines is one of the first things I say when people who don’t understand F1 ask me why I love it.

      1. MISTER says:

        Been to Silverstone last year and I was going up the stairs in the grandstand at Village B (could not see the cars at that stage) and heard the cars passing by and accelarating towards under the bridge. Was blown away by the sound. The TV sound is nothing to what you get at the track. Pure awesomeness and win.

      2. Sebee says:

        TV sound WAS nothing compared to what you USED to get at the track!

    9. Chuck 32 says:

      beef flavored tofu.. love that!

    10. Timmay says:

      Less tickets will be sold, period. That will filter through to other media and it will cause quite an f1 recession if they don’t fix it. I have been to half a dozen melboure GPs including 2013s, malaysia & singapore once esch, hockenheim & hungary too. i would not go again based on the current spectacle.

      1. Sebee says:

        Here is the thing, you would not only hear the old cars with your ears. You’d hear it with every bone in your body. Even when your ears were protected, you felt the violence of the sound. For those that never experienced this, well, it’s hard to explain. I don’t know if this feeling of the sound is still present. Have to wait till they come around.

      2. Jim says:

        Unfortunately F1 doesn’t make any money from ticket sales, so they probably don’t care.

      3. Kidza says:

        The race tracks do!

    11. Steve says:

      What is more interesting is the amount of people protecting their hearing in 2013 compared to none in 2014….

    12. Rafael Lopez says:

      Yep exactly! That video made one thing very clear to me:

      1. I will probably continue to watch F1 on TV
      2. I will definitely not spend money to go to a GP.

      It’s sad. I live in the U.S. and was thinking of going to Spa wither in 2014 or 2015 to experience this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHkW7Icu7Qc

      Unfortunately, the experience will be much less exciting (and not worth the multiple thousand dollars) with the new engines.

      Assuming the comparison video you’re talking about is this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS4Dh_EAfJI

  5. Sebee says:

    Not much of a survey I must say.

    I liked it? I didn’t like it?

    How can the rules be perfectly clear to the millions watching? It was the first time many of them learned about the rules.

    1. Phil says:

      ‘Very clear’ I thought was the wording. Not surprising really, given the amount of coverage about the rule changes.

    2. alexbookoo says:

      Yes it was as if Ferrari hadn’t thought about the survey at all, and had just put it up there for the sake of it. “What do you think will be the key factor in Malaysia?” Obviously everyone is going to answer the engine, so they learn nothing from that. “Which teams will have the closest matched drivers in terms of points?” I see that most people answered Mercedes, but there will be at least 7 points between the Mercedes drivers because if one of them finishes, they will win. But in any case, what’s the point of answering that question? What does it tell Ferrari that’s of any use? Unless it is actually a trick question for Ferrari to test how smart their fans aren’t.

      1. Agree – a pretty poor survey that can provide no meaningful data with which to identify where changes should be made.

    3. Grant H says:

      Agree too early and its not fair test really, would expect that more ferrari fans on a ferrari web page with a ferrari f1 car that is not yet setting world on fire will vote negative

    4. franed says:

      And yet so far, the rules are very clear is clearly in the lead.

      The good majority Liked the Oz GP too.

      The power train is miles ahead as being the limiting factor in the next race.

      And Merc is the one! But why is the question about drivers closeness of points? Why not who will win? (maybe that would be too disheartening for the tiffosi!

    5. Dave P says:

      More than that… you can expect a large vote of ‘I didn’t like it’ simply because this is a Ferrari website asking if the liked it… they came 5th… they aint gonna like it !!

    6. Wayne says:

      Survey was idiotic, facile and pointless.

      The ONLY time f1 teams are interested in fans’ opinions are when they align or can be twisted to align with the team’s current agenda and interests. Short of that, the F1 teams are cowardly, self serving corporate entities for whom ‘sport’ is the last thing on their mind. The real kicker is that they judge us fans too stupid to notice when they try to use us in this way.

      1. Michael says:

        +1 Very true.

    7. Clarks4WheelDrift says:

      Agree, twas a survey crafted with the skill and grace of the Scuderia’s nose-design department…

      (or engine design dept, or strategy dept, or aero dept, or brake by wire dept, or in-season development dept, or wind tunnel to real-world calibration dept or presidente etc…) ;)

      I mean, take Q4:
      “In Sepang, which team will have the closest matched drivers in terms of points?”
      Ferrari
      Williams
      Mercedes
      McLaren.

      Now with Merc on for a 1,2, that would be 25 points for 1st and 18 points for second, a seven point difference.
      Williams on for 3rd and 4th, McLaren on for 5th and 6th.
      If Ferrari are lucky, they’ll be in the lower points, probably Fernando one place ahead of Kimi and hence a difference of only 1 point. So the logical answer is Ferrari, or is it just a poor question ;)

      Better with: Q4 Who would win in an ice-cream eating competition? Kimi or Fernando?

      A = Fernando spent more time with his cone engineers, his strawberry sauce mechanics, his sprinkles designers and more time in the ice cream simulator. So despite Kimi’s experience Fernando finished his ice cream cone 20 seconds ahead but complained as Sebastian had a cone with Fernando’s favourite ice cream flavour.

      1. samuraisammakko says:

        +1

      2. Sasidharan says:

        LOL! My answer was Ferrari for exactly same reason, Pos 8&9 or Pos 9 & 10 are the closest.

    8. j says:

      You post on this site A LOT.

      If you didn’t like the race, aren’t clear on the rules, have no idea of what factor might make the difference in Malaysia?… what are you doing here?

      Or is it that you find yourself superior to all other “regular” fans who are watching?

      Perhaps you have been sold a bill of goods, like most of us, that old chestnut that the casual fan can’t tell the drivers apart and doesn’t understand what fuel is or what hybrid means.

      1. Sebee says:

        Thanks for your feedback.

        I enjoy the discussion of fans sharing their point of view. No one is superior here and all views are free to be expressed. We challenge each other’s views, and more often than not realize that in this sport we enjoy it’s all gray, never black and white. Even something as basic as who’s the best driver can’t be answered definitively. And so the discussions are always heated, and endless!

      2. Clarks4WheelDrift says:

        Nice response, though to both prove and disprove your points… definitively, it’s Jim Clark. ;)

      3. Sebee says:

        It’s your own funeral Clarks4WheelDrift. Picking a guy who had no idea about aero, carbon, paddles, ECUs, engine maps!?

        And on Senna’s birthday? Been nice knowing you mate.

        To those of you who don’t know any better, if you want to keep your friends don’t talk to them about religion, politics and who the best F1 driver is.

      4. Elie says:

        Great words of Advise Sebee. MrClarks4wheelDrift needs to understand every person has their favourite for one reason or another. But when a 7 time WC and more than half the top motor racers on the planet tell you its Senna- its really a pointless isnt it.

      5. Sebee says:

        Elie, Clarks,

        I promised myself I wouldn’t because I want us to be friends. But seriously, everyone knows Schumi is the man. :-)

    9. James Clayton says:

      Survey isn’t about getting a fan’s reaction at all now, is it? It’s about Ferrari getting what *they* want. Even so, the question is still somewhat bizarre.

      With regards to this article, I find lines like “There will be a lot more overtaking in Sepang next weekend with the two consecutive straights, linked by a hairpin.” extremely irritating. I don’t understand when we crossed over to the idea that 20 meaningless passes per lap makes a better race than 10 passes per race that each had a 20-lap story behind it of relentless driving from 2 of the greatest drivers in the world, in the greatest machines in the world.

      We find the fastest driver over a single lap on a Saturday. As Martin Brundle one said “we line them up from fastest to slowest and wonder why they don’t pass each other”. But until 2011, F1 had *never* been about quantity of passes.. It used to be about quality.

      1. James Clayton says:

        As for the new formula and the fuel saving issue. It was madness to limit the manufacturers to 100kilos straight off. Last year’s average was 150, was it not? So there should have been a sliding scale; reduce by 10 kilos each year and give the technology time to evolve (something technology does best – how often does the first iteration of a concept ever hit the nail right on the head?).

        And the sound… I’ve commented about it before… solo the cars sound fine. In a race together they sound awful. But if that’s what the technology produces, then that’s what it produces. Both Bernie and Toto have talked about wanting to find ways to increase the volume; but the thought of anything being added to the cars with the sole purpose of amplifying the noise makes me cringe.

      2. Voodoopunk says:

        “As for the new formula and the fuel saving issue. It was madness to limit the manufacturers to 100kilos straight off. ”

        Nothing wrong with that, it should make them efficient, but to limit the flow?… barmy.

  6. Jonno says:

    On the fuel saving thing – that was happening last year when there wasn’t a regulation on maximun amount, the teams were constantly underfueling anyway, see Mercedes at Malaysia (and aren’t they already saying that even this year they won’t need the full 100kg at every race?) … if you want to them to push for more of the race, maybe the regulation should say that they have to start with exactly 100kg for every race – that way they way as well use the fuel rather than underfuel the things all the time?

    1. Jimbo says:

      Then they’d just dial up the fuel consumption more and they would still need to ease off towards the end if they’d over cooked it early or not had a safety car.

      Ultimately, as long as the speed advantage gained by pushing 100% for the full race is less than the advantage gained by having less weight of fuel on board, that is how it’s going to be.

      I also find the comments of the likes of Briatore quite patronising – it may be because I’m an engineer, but I really don’t think the rule changes are that complicated. F1 is supposed to represent the cutting edge of technology and engineering – so complexity is part of what makes it what it is (for me anyway). There’s always monster trucks if you want dumb thrills!

    2. Alex says:

      Exactly, there should be a minimum fuel amount to stop people fuel saving, it adds nothing to the spectacle of F1 which is what the whole sport is about – being a spectacle. Th big wigs always say teams spending money adds nothing to the sport and they need cost caps etc, what does fuel saving add? F1 should be a flat out race from lights out to chequered flag and i can see this fuel saving nonsense spoiling more then a few races this season.

      1. audifan says:

        never has been , never will be

    3. j says:

      Great point. The teams like to act like the fuel saving engine modes are in place due to the FIA but in reality they have been using them for years (and praying for safety cars) because it’s a faster way to finish a race distance.

      Also +1 for Jimbo.

  7. IJW says:

    Shame they didn’t heed the views of the fans with regards to the double points fiasco.
    As for the sound, I like it. Why? Because, I can hear everything else, the tyres, the bottoming of the cars against the ground, the roar of the crowds, etc.
    The ear-splitting sounds of the V8s simply drowned everything else out. I don’t get why people liked that.

    1. Nick says:

      ‘The ear-splitting sounds of the V8s simply drowned everything else out. I don’t get why people liked that.’ … Because they drowned everything else out. If you want to hear the odd tyre screech you can go the the kart track and get it for free

  8. Thanks, James – appreciate the steer.

    Having taken the “survey,” though, not very clear what might be expected from the result – generalized questions and from a “fan” standpoint the questions seem to be wanting for a lot more technical knowledge than most of us probably have to provide a good answer. If “perception” is the goal, then probably more to the point.

    Interestingly, of the 900 +/- responses at this writing, the vast majority indicate the FIA regulations are “very clear” – guess that means something to the effect of ‘…if it doesn’t say you can, you can’t…’ or alternatively, if it says ‘…thou shalt…’ then y’all better do it. Said differently still: if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck… Just sayin’.

    1. James Allen says:

      I think it’s important to take part even if it is a bit Peter and Jane.

      It’s a positive move. Of course cynics would argue that shortened races or any kind of forced re-engineering of the Power units to boost sound would help Ferrari.

      Mercedes like things just as they are!

      1. Graham says:

        Surely the first thing Formula 1 management need to do if we are talking about improving the integrity of the championship etc is to drop the double points rule for the last round…

      2. Chris says:

        I will complete the survey. However, these surveys are often used to justify the status quo as they are corrupted by vested interests. I doubt F1 will admit they got it wrong. It is what it is now. Nothing will overcome the feeling that I have been conned by F1 about the new regulations with the pre-season hype. The post race super hype about the new era was worse. I don’t like being conned. However, I can only act as an individual and therefore I no longer visit the F1 web site and I will not be in Melbourne next year.

  9. Fan says:

    If Melbourne is an indication of whats to come then I’m not a fan of the new F1. Too many retirements, too little noise, too much engine nursing/fuel conservation, too few on track battles, too much arcane rules violations changing the finishing order hours after turning off the TV. They changed too much too quickly and lost the character of the product.

    1. Lawrence says:

      Too many retirements? At the first race of an entirely new power plant? Wow. People want the pinnacle of technology but man it better work perfect the first time out of the box or else.

  10. nusratolla says:

    I just have to say one thing to Ferrari… C126 series Ferrari was a monstrous beast…. Nothing sounded more scary than that ever in F1…. The Stabs of Flames from that Turbo was simply spectacular…. After which the V12 was awesome…. Alesi and Berger were perfect…..

    Coming to 2012…. Bring Back Refueling…. increase in turbo bar…. add back two more cylinder…. Slope noses according to me are better than elevated…. I still consider Michael Schumacher won his first two world titles in a Boat while driving the Benetton.

    Sound…. oh that awful awful sound of 2014 engines…. I have to invent a new word for them – desctacular (opposite of spectacular)

    And please sort out Kimi’s Issues I still think it is the steering.

    1. nusratolla says:

      Correction: Not 2012 but 2014…. sorry for typo.

    2. Brent says:

      All of those things you seek in racing are available. It’s called vintage racing.

  11. CC says:

    Would Ferrari be doing this if their drivers had locked out the front row and finished a commanding 1-2? Yet again, Ferrari have turned up in Melbourne with an inferior car that lacks the aerodynamic downforce supremacy of its key British rivals, allied to an engine that lacks the installation and efficiency to be outright performance leader. I suspect that are looking on at Mercedes and possibly even Williams with a certain envy.
    Still, it will be interesting to see how James Allison can implement a coherent development strategy to give Ferrari a competitive edge – but at the very earliest, that will be in Barcelona as development at the fly away races is obviously limited.

  12. Laurie Hayes says:

    Was excited to see this, but the survey is not fit for purpose and is pointless.

  13. mcgregor says:

    Survey wasn’t adequate. The tone of the cars doesn’t bother me, but the lack of decibels sure does. I also don’t like complicated silly technology. Brake by wire? How about brake with foot?

  14. Dave Aston says:

    I thought it was great. I’d prefer no restrictions on tyres, but I love the sound. It’s the best racing series in the world, always evolving. I didn’t like the economy runs in the 80s, grooved tyres in ’98, but they can’t please everyone.

    I think the biggest difference now is that more than ever, people in developed countries without big problems like getting clean food and water just want to complain about anything.

    I think the characteristics of the new engines, seeing the cars load up in mid corner, is cool, and I love the noise. We’ve got Bottas and Magnussen and Ricciardo pushing hard to win their first GP, Button and Alonso warming up to peak complain mode, Kobayashi ready to score the first points for a new team, Vettel under pressure, it’s awesome.

  15. Andyc_f1 says:

    So the push for shortened races has everything to do with the fans, and less so to do with the fact Ferrari are apparently struggling on fuel efficiency?

    Call me a cynic James, but Luca has never worried about the fans. Unless it suited his agenda.

  16. Not being smart but maybe Ferrari’s time would be better spent developing a quicker car! Under the last rules they complained about aerodynamics dominating and now they are moaning about engines and the spectacle.

    It has been a long time since any team has coveted a Ferrari innovation and I fear that Alonso and Raikkonen are in for a difficult season.

    Personally, I will miss the old engine sound but that does not mean I dont like the new engines. I think it is very exciting that F1 engineers in competition are going to revolutionise our motoring experience. Formula 1 had to evolve to remain relevant and to survive.

    Hopefully a few more engine manufacturers are enticed to the sport.

  17. Chris NZ says:

    i like this new f1. It mixed up the norm. Noise was a bit dull, but we can deal with it. Turn up your tv

  18. goferet says:

    For sure, F1 got off to a bad start when the noses were revealed, I mean come on people, cars need to be eye candy for the fans.

    Then testing came around and we found out that the Renault powered cars were in shambles as the engine was no good likewise, Ferrari (who were hoping to fight for every title under the sun with their world class driver line up) found out their engines were lacking pace.

    And to make matters worse, the fans find out the F1 soundtrack has been altered and not for the better. Yes, the whole point of attending a GP live is to hear the cars in your chest as the earth vibrates i.e. the way all racing cars should.

    Lastly, to add insult to injury, the fans are now told that the pilots will have to lift off at the straights with the aim of saving fuel.

    Apparently, everytime the fans see the red light flicker at the rear then this means the drivers are saving fuel.

    Overall, the first race of the season didn’t give the fans a good feeling for things to come.

    1. TGS says:

      “…to hear the cars in your chest…”, this is exactly what was missing in Melbourne. I didn’t mind the sound but it was no longer a physical experience.

    2. marc says:

      I thought the red light flickering was because they were out of charge ? And not a coasting indicater am I wrong please someone enlighten me

      1. goferet says:

        @ marc

        Maybe Charlie Whiting can explain better
        http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/112930?source=latest

  19. Matías says:

    I just don’t get it: why is such a problem the sound? the f1 have more than 500 millons viewers worldwide, and in each venue can be as much as 100.000? I’m from Argentina, and if the engine gets 130 or 180db, i hardly can tell the difference: i hear it over the tv, so is as simple as equalizing in a different mix the audio and voilá! I agree with Melbourne not being the ideal place to make judgement. I remember Bahrain 2010, was one of the most boring races i’ve ever seen but then, i can’t remember a more exciting f1 season than that. Let’s wait and see. Also, i recommend every one to read an amazing post written by Darren Heath about this subject…

    1. a) Can you provide a link to Darren’ Heath’s post?

      b) see my response to Seebee’s post at number 4 to get a view on why sound is important.

      1. Matías says:

        First of all: Go Brisbane Reds! Second, here’s the link: http://www.darrenheath.com/season/2014/australia-2014/blog/sound-and-fury

        I don’t say that the sound isn’t important, i say isn’t crucial. You get to see f1, but you’re 1 in 5000 in the viewers. It’s very different the way you follow f1 when you know you’ll never get to go to a race. When’s like that, then you forget about the noise, you only want to see te very pinnacle of engineering in the cars, and the very best drivers on them. If you look some footage of Senna driving the gorgeous MP4/4, is it any less impressive if you blast your speakers or if you mute them? Do the test, look at this video in mute: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_y8wgmbphc and tell me if is any less than incredible. The car and the drivers is what matters, the noise, really comes second to me :)

  20. Sebee says:

    I know it may sound a bit silly, but perhaps the simplest solution here is this. Supplement the sound with amp and some type of horn speaker?

    How about a mic goes before the turbo, feeda to an amp (battery already on board after all), and feeds out to a speaker. I’m sure compact/light technology exists that can put out 140db-150db easily with minimal weight and should fit somewhere. It’s just a few wires, amp, horn.

    This solution would not require an engine rule re-write. It would not require higher RPM, which in result require more fuel, which the cars are not equipped to carry.

    This would sipmly UNDO what the turbo is doing to reduce the sound level. It would do it without rule changes. It could be tuned to a level desired, and it would be the actual engine sound, pre-turbo, so not some MP3 rev file.

    It’s a solution that can be in place quite quickly and at low cost as well.

    Feedback?

    1. Random 79 says:

      Yes you might get a bit of feedback, but a decent mike and speaker setup should minimise it.

    2. What? And amplify the awful sound of unstressed, mis-firing engines in cruise mode? That would just rob us of that wonderful/annoying turbo whine (or was that Kimi moaning into his car-to-pit radio I was hearing?).

      1. Sebee says:

        You do need a trained ear to tell the difference.

        Well, you’ve heard these first hand, so you can judge best. What you’re saying is there is no way to make Britney sound like Whitney.
        Maybe we need a vocoder between the mic and the amp – Kanye style?

    3. Sasidharan says:

      “What an idea Sir-ji?”
      Force India will have a problem as Hulk is already heavy and the amp will weigh something. They should revise the min weight rule to accomodate this change.

    4. Esteban says:

      Yes, you’re being silly.

    5. James Clayton says:

      Sounds horrible but if it’s going to appease the fans then I guess something like that will be done. More fakness is just what F1 needs, right?

      1. Sebee says:

        Well then, I guess we can’t do anything about the sound then. After all, changing the engine formula is not going to happen.

  21. Thread the Needle says:

    Shortening races and boosting the sound, F1 is getting so fake

    1. Random 79 says:

      F1 has always been fake.

      1. Gaz Boy says:

        Thankfully Random the Big Man Above does help – a drop of rain now again at inappropriate moments (for the teams!) a la Germany 2000, Hungary 2006 and Canada 2011, or even one of his more eccentric followers to make a great race such as Silverstone 2003. God is an F1 fan – if he think things are getting too dull, he just douses the track with a splash of water!

  22. Ken says:

    You guys are doing nothing the new car such a disappointment, I feel for Alonso and Kim. You’ve failed the Ferrari Fans again.

  23. Adam says:

    Not much to provide feedback on! Shockingly dull start to the season. F1 should be about getting to the end of race in the fastest possible time. All this nursing of tyres/fuel has destroyed F1′s spectacle (not to mention the lawnmower sounds).

  24. Opa says:

    Electricity and mechanics have each its beauty. Let electric motors for E-Formula and those beautiful noisy traditional machines for F1. We above the 40s deserve that. Save fuel of the huge team motorhomes.

    1. Brent says:

      Why do “we above the 40′s deserve it”. Is it because we are the most selfish, wasteful demographic ever to live on planet Earth?

  25. Simmo says:

    Well it’s interesting that the main factor for Malaysia is being voted as the power unit (89%) rather than the tyres (4%)!!

    1. It’s because the tyres are proving to be waaaayyy ore durable than last years. That is partly due to Pirelli changing the compounds but also partly because the cars cannot be driven as hard as they could/should due to fuel and engine saving. So the efficiency and reliability of the engine is now THE MOST signifcant factor in determining how hard a driver can push things – and on the basis of Melbourne it’s not that hard.

    2. Voodoopunk says:

      From one extreme to the other?

    3. James Clayton says:

      Who would have predicted that, eh?! :)

  26. pdcincan says:

    Jean Todt is no doubt the author of much of the resource restrictions. For the past number of years we have seen cars tip toe around on contrived tire restrictions. Now we have contrived tire and fuel restrictions. Look at the speed at which the cars took the corners in Australia. My Grandmother could drive those cars.

    The sound is appropriate for a Sunday as that is when people cut their grass. The F1 paddock emulating a fleet of lawnmowers seems somewhat appropriate, don’t you think?

    1. That’s it! That’s EXACTLY what they sounded like – my mis-firing old lawn mower that hasn’t been serviced in 10 years. Good spot. Although, to be fair, if I could get my lawn mower to move across the grass at the rate they were going across the grass (often) at Melbourne I would be very happy. Perhaps I should get it serviced.

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        “Although, to be fair, if I could get my lawn mower to move across the grass at the rate they were going across the grass (often) at Melbourne I would be very happy. Perhaps I should get it serviced.”

        Get someone who’s proficient on a PS3.

  27. Matt W says:

    Far too premature for this kind of survey. We are one race in for heaven’s sake. Shortening the races would be the final straw for me with F1 though.

  28. Dennis says:

    Apparently it is now a bad thing that it is actually possible to hear what the CAR is doing, instead of just the engine. Apparently it is also a bad thing that your ears doesn’t explode if you don’t wear protection.

    This is a sport of technology, technique and speed. The loudness of the engine should be not matter, especially when it makes it harder to follow what is going on.

  29. Lazy Andy says:

    If I recall my GCSE physics correctly the heat and sound eminating from light bulbs, sewing machines, engines etc. is wasted energy. The lost noise is being used to make these engines better, faster and the pinnacle of Motorsport.

    The suggestion was that some teams think they’ll have improved in the efficiency targets which should mean less fuel / lighter car or same fuel / more powerful settings…

    These cars will come good in a couple of races. Many teams were still doing test mileage I’m Aus, including RBR!

    I personally liked hearing the other F1 sounds, screech of tyres spinning, brushes against the wall, gravel on carbon…

  30. AuraF1 says:

    Damn Ferrari are getting on my nerves with this incessant sniping at the formula. They had their chance – they couldn’t keep up with red bulls aero dominance so they demanded a series based on engine performance and that challenged drivers with less insane grip – they got it – even by poaching the Lotus chief designer they can’t compete with Mercedes now – just get on with it and stop complaining from the sidelines. Do they want a formula based on ‘reddest car wins’ rules?

    Ferrari always present this argument in a passive aggressive ‘oh we’re only thinking of the poor fans’ distraction. No if they were thinking of the fans they could have vetoed the double points in the final race nonsense but after blabbing about it in the media, they kowtowed to Bernie as they thought it might serve their interest.

    And seriously can we stop with the ‘oh the old V8s were perfect, everything was great, now it’s ruined…’ We’ve had years of processional bore fests at many tracks – if we get even a few more overtakes without DRS and the drivers have to fight to control the cars then it’s an improvement – the sound is totally secondary to a proper race where drivers drive. Sure a V8 in full screech was awesome but then everyone moaned when the V10s went out and everyone who wants the formula to stand still is missing the whole ethos of motor racing. It changes! Deal with it.

    1. Pat Palozzi says:

      After watching F1, for the better part of 50years,8,10,12, and Brm H16.this is a totally insult the fan.Sorry to spending all this money for tickets to Montreal.
      Please someone come to their senses and revert to my old F1.

    2. Pat Palozzi says:

      So what do you have now,and the double point is such a stupid idea,I hope it never happens.

  31. Folkdisco says:

    So basically you’re advocating a return to a race version of the ‘fuel burn’ qualifying days of ’07? The single most daft regulation, ever? Really? F1 2014 looks good to me. As someone who has been watching for several decades, it’s about time F1 dragged itself into the 21st century. I think a lot of the whinging is people who don’t so much watch F1, as concentrate on their personal favourite drivers and ignore the rest of the show. Again, IMHO! ;-)

  32. NJB says:

    F1 in 2014 is wrong on so many levels.

    I’ll try to keep this succinct;

    1) Double points in AD
    2) DRS
    3) Ugly cars
    4) No noise
    5) Fuel saving / drivers not flat out
    6) engine is main performance differentiator and freeze on engine development means field cannot close up to Merc
    7) Pay drivers

    I’ve been watching f1 since 1991 and whilst i’m all for progress it seems to me that F1 is losing its essence. It’s a sad day when GP2 is starts to look and sound more like F1 than F1 itself.

    1. Timmay says:

      That sums it up, i may copy paste for later

    2. John says:

      “F1 is losing its essence” Agreed NJB. I said as much in my comment and I guess I should have read your’s first with no need to post mine but glad I did to get it off my chest.

  33. Truth or Lies says:

    I just participated in the survey. But it must have been an idle hands day at Maranello, do they not have anything better to do?

    Eitherway the sound is hardly going to change anytime soon, same for the fuel flow regulations. Just need to soak it up, but at least in Maylasia the racing should be better. Melbourne is always a non event, nothing ever happens and its on in the middle of the night !!

  34. Mike84 says:

    Sorry, but What a useless survey!

    “Did you like the GP?”
    - It’s not that simple, I refuse to answer one way or the other because it mis-states my real opinion.

    I liked the fact there was a GP that I could watch, that it was in Australia, and that it had new technology that is sophisticated. But I disliked that all I remember hearing was two commentators saying the cars have no spark plugs, because they don’t know the difference between direct injection and dieseling. Other than that, it was all visual — and all I saw was hideous cars following each other, passing with DRS, stopping with engine failure, or crashing with brake failure and taking a podium contender out of the race on the first lap.

    So I both liked and hated it. There’s no true answer to the question, either way it’s warped and misrepresenting what I really think.

    If 95% of fans liked it just a little more than they hated it, and voted “Like”, it would hide that most people are highly dissatisfied and on the edge of hating it more than they like it.

    All the other questions on the survey are even more stupid & useless than the first IMO.

    My true opinion? It’s just a weirder style of billboard watching.

    1. Caterhamfan says:

      I only got the first question, so even more pointless :(

  35. Mike says:

    At least give it a couple of races to see how races pan out before jumping to conclusions.

    Yes the cars are quieter, but the sound is more interesting. You can also hear tyres locking up, which adds to the spectacle.

    The cars sliding around is the best part of the new rules. It makes the cars look difficult to drive. Though I fear as the season progresses and teams develop more downforce and smoother engine maps this will become less obvious.

    Fuel saving could become boring to watch, but it think it would be best to wait to a few different circuits before making a judgement.

    This sounds like Ferrari putting pressure on the FIA because they’ve designed yet another uncompetitive car.

  36. deane says:

    Don’t do the survey people, unless you want to help Ferrari with their agenda.

    1. Michael says:

      Yeah, your right!!

    2. Pat Palozzi says:

      How is doing the survey going to help Ferrari.
      Give your head a shake.

  37. Alex says:

    If they want a radical change then award points based on how far you finish behind the leader. Gives everyone a reason to push all the way throughout the race.

  38. pdcincan says:

    And how is it that these power units are so sophisticated and costly. Formula 1 hasn’t had a valve train in the engine for over 20 years. These “power units” have camshafts and conventional valves! With all that weight and mass on the top end, you know that the bottom end will have to have the same kind of mass. And that means solid crankshafts. Formula 1 hasn’t had a solid crank for at least 15 years. So these engines are no more sophisticated than a Ford DFV from 1972.

    The Formula 1 fan is there for the technology and the extreme pressure the driver is put under. These cars remind me of the 1972 Ford Pinto my Grandmother drove.

    1. Brent says:

      Oh baloney.

      1. pdcincan says:

        Articulate, are you suggesting the Ford Pinto was not a great car?

      2. Brent says:

        I’m suggesting you know nothing about engine design (F1 or otherwise) and likely have never heard a ’72 Pinto, but I’m just going by what you wrote.

  39. Veteran says:

    Now they ask feedback? First they push the stupid double point rule everybody hates. Everybody retaliates. But now it is not going their way, they need fan input? So much hypocrisy…

  40. neilmurg says:

    I like the new noises, more going on, not drowned out, and being able to talk and cheer. It would be interesting to see what the percentages of like / don’t like are.
    For me, Briatore’s opinion doesn’t count for much. I wonder if the issues will be given time for calm reflection, given that those in favour of bleeding ears are doubly disadvantaged by already being deaf (to the arguments as well as the cars?). :P

    1. Random 79 says:

      +3

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        3?

      2. Random 79 says:

        +1 for acknowledging that there are good points to having quieter engines, +1 for bagging Briatore, and +1 for the little joke at the end.

        So +3 :)

  41. Grant H says:

    It should be worth mentioning merc were not hanging around fuel saving were they…need to wait a few races before judging….noise could be louder but other than that i like new f1 just as much

  42. Random 79 says:

    And what’s Briatore going to do to improve the show? Arrange for more crashes?

    This is the first race of a new formula after a very difficult winter testing so of course the most of the teams and drivers were going to ere on the side of caution, but that doesn’t mean that they are going to be doing the same for long.

    1. Gaz Boy says:

      Well said Random. Yes, I remember after the dirge that was the 2005 AUS GP where Fisi and Renault dominated – under the 1 set of tyres per weekend rules – Mr Briatore was as happy as a fat kid in a sweet shop and not exactly calling for “improvements to the show.” Short memories, no?
      PS Hoped you enjoy the Fatbooth F1 pictures – of course, for Indycar and NASCAR drivers, computer altered imagery is hardly necessary when it comes to adding bulk – or for those series spectators, come to think of it!

      1. Random 79 says:

        Yeah I did notice the absence of a Montoya pic :)

        As for the rest, standard story: Winners win and losers whinge.

  43. Olivier says:

    “The Fans” are confusing me:

    They don’t want DRS = too artificial.

    They don’t want Double Points = too artificial.

    They want artificial engine noise to beef up the sound = ??

    What’s my view as “a Fan”?

    DRS = okay. You want the fast cars up front. However, I can see ERS rendering DRS useless in the not so distant future.

    Double Points = debatable. Not in Abu Dhabi but I can see it work in other venues. For me the classic venues are worth the double points.

    Noise = I am loving the current sound of the engines. We have moved on from Heavy Metal to Jazz.

    1. Sasidharan says:

      No more F1Rocks shows. they’ll have F1 Ghazals (Indo-Pak light music)

    2. James Clayton says:

      ‘“The Fans” are confusing me’

      That’s because you’re lumping them together as an individual unit and assuming that it’s the same “fans” who dislike DRS & Double Points that are also complaining about the noise, without doing any research to arrive at the conclusion.

      I, for one, hate DRS, Pijelli and Double Points
      I am also *against* increasing the volume of the engines artificially for precisely the same reason – it’s artificial.

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        “That’s because you’re lumping them together as an individual unit ”

        The great unwashed masses, aren’t they always right?

        Doesn’t the majority rule?

      2. James Clayton says:

        Well done for completely missing my point

      3. Voodoopunk says:

        Thanks.

        What was it again? I couldn’t hear it over the whining.

      4. James Clayton says:

        It really wasn’t difficult, and there was no whining in that post. I choose my preferences to illustrate a point, but if you’d like
        “whining” taken out to make it easier for you to understand, I’ll gladly re-write the post from a 3rd person point of view. I’m nice like that:

        ———–

        ‘“The Fans” are confusing me’

        That’s because you’re lumping them together as an individual unit and assuming that it’s the same “fans” who dislike DRS & Double Points that are also complaining about the noise, without doing any research to arrive at the conclusion.

        It is entirely possible that the fans who dislike DRS, Pirelli and Double Points, are also the ones *against* increasing the volume of the engines artificially for precisely the same reason – it’s artificial. It’s also entirely possible, Olivier, that you’re correct and the people who dislike DRS, Pirelli, and Double Points also want to artificially increase the engine sound. If that’s the case, then I agree it’s quite a hypocritical stance. But without any research (oh how I wish we had a use case to demonstrate with…) then it’s unfair to make such assumptions.

        —–

        better?

      5. Olivier says:

        Fair Point!

  44. franed says:

    Absolute rubbish Flav! We had fuel saving and tyre management way back in the first turbo era.

    Why is there a suicidal urge to reduce things to the lowest common denominator? Why treat fans as uneducated teens with ADHD? It is perfectly easy to follow you do not need to reduce it to a drag race.

    This is all part of Bernie’s multi purpose misdirection campaign, he wants the cheaper engine back so the pressure for more money for the teams is less, he wants attention away from Germany, and the Swiss court case and the Bluewater court case, he has primed Flav and the Ossies to make as much noise as possible.

    Luca, since he gave up the idea of being Prime Minister is frustrated that he is not in charge of everything and has been shouting and throwing his weight about a lot, perhaps forgetting that he voted for the new rules.

    1. Voodoopunk says:

      “Why treat fans as uneducated teens with ADHD?”

      From the comments I read the majority of them should be treated that way.

      1. C63 says:

        That’s a sweeping generalisation, and very unfair to the majority of the posters on this site. Sir, I demand that you withdraw it immediately! Seriously though, it’s a bit strong don’t you think?

      2. Voodoopunk says:

        “Seriously though, it’s a bit strong don’t you think?”

        Do you think so?

        I bet Hamilton wouldn’t think so, he’s brilliant.

      3. C63 says:

        You’ve lost me there, sorry. What has Hamilton got to do with the majority of fans comments leading you to believe they are uneducated teens with ADHD?
        Oh hang on, that not one of your questions posted in response to my comment that isn’t really a question aimed at me, is it? ;-)

      4. Voodoopunk says:

        “Oh hang on, that not one of your questions posted in response to my comment that isn’t really a question aimed at me, is it?”

        No.

      5. C63 says:

        Thank you for that, at least you have cleared up the second part of my query. Just waiting for the veil of mystery to be lifted from your Hamilton comment and we can close the ‘file’.

  45. Simon says:

    Change will only happen when the ratings fall.
    I’ve done my bit.

  46. adriana says:

    So Mr Todt if you go to buy a new hybrid car now , are they going to tell you that you just can use 10 gallons of fuel per week ? this is absurd!!! I miss the 80′s and 90′s battles with some of the best machines and drivers ever , this era it is just about engineers .

    1. Random 79 says:

      Where do you think those “best machines” of the 80′s and 90′s came from?

      Maybe now the engineers get more credit and publicity than they used to, but then again why shouldn’t they?

    2. C63 says:

      I think you are being a bit harsh. Make no mistake, these new cars are a handful to drive. As for engineering being the dominant factor, well, it was ever thus.

    3. DC says:

      Actually during some of the best battles of ’80s fuel conservation was one of the most important factors. It’s interesting that many fans regard ’80s as the F1′s best era – what did we have: turbos, V6 and even 4 in line engines and fuel limits. What do we have in 2014: turbos, V6 and fuel limits.

    4. Voodoopunk says:

      “are they going to tell you that you just can use 10 gallons of fuel per week”

      No, but they’ll provide a correctional offset for you to get that, which may even be correct.

  47. Jodum5 says:

    Finally saw part of the race last night. I don’t see the huge problem with the noise (at least on TV), yes they’re quieter, but I actually think they have an eclectic lower pitched grunt that the old ones (plus the turbo). If the teams can find a way (no electronic acoustics please!) to up the decibels a bit, I think it’d be perfectly fine.

    I also don’t get the issue with the disqualification. Red Bull was seen to break the rules, so they were tossed out. Where was the outrage when BOTH Williams cars were tossed out of the 2005 (?) Canadian GP?

    Journalists like you, James, need to provide some thought out perspective to some of these people panicking.

  48. Michael Grievson says:

    And cheating isn’t showing a lack of respect Flav?

    1. C63 says:

      Good point – made me laugh out loud too!

  49. Jeremysmith says:

    They should be given enough fuel so that they can push throughout the entire race, without having to worry about fuel conservation..

    The sound is a more difficult thing to fix … It’s very different, not bad but just very very different ..

  50. Kris says:

    Lame excuse for a survey. What kind of a question is:
    What do you think will be the key factor in Malaysia?

    Provide any answer and the Horse Whisperer blog (or whatever it’s called) will manipulate it to create a story about how F1 has taken a wrong turn.

    What about an option such as:
    The amount and quality of preparation and innovation between seasons.

    Really, I wonder if Ferrari would do this if they’d scored well in Melbourne. I guess it’s embarrassing to be fighting behind a team that was nowhere last year (McLaren) and lucky that circumstances conspired against a much smaller team (Williams) finishing with both cars ahead.

    I hate this moaning, I really do. Are the teams and engineers so short-sighted as to not have anticipated these problems when agreeing to the rule changes. You’d think this had all been forced upon them without them having a say.

  51. Dave P says:

    What istotally under played about the noise and not really mentioned by journalists is that on TV which is 99% of the people watching the Grand Prix, the old sound had no impact other that you could hear it being high pitched and clearly hid other sounds such as the crowd and tyre squeal.

    I totally would rather hear the crowd and tyres… Everyone inthe pits, Team members, Drivers Journalists do not represent the 99% of us watching on TV.

    When I was at Silverstone at Club Corner, I was so far back to me the old sound was not that impressive anyway.

    1. C63 says:

      I totally agree with all your points. I like to hear the crowd roar, tyres screeching and the whistle from the turbo (?) as the engine rev’s drop. To be honest I didn’t think I would, as I like big, loud, powerful engines as much as anyone. But these new engines/power units are extraordinary and equally impressive, just in a different way.

      1. DC says:

        Prior to Aus GP I thought I would hate the new sound and that it would be just like touring cars. Found myself quite liking it, as others said there is so much more going on. And something no-one is mentioning, yes, the sound of old V8 was unbelievable on straights but in turns they sounded like they were broken with all that smart engine mapping etc.

    2. Kris says:

      Great points.

      I’m not an Aussie or a [mod] or lover of Red Bull but two of the highlights for me from the weekend were the crowds roaring when Vettel went out of Q2 and the one that greeted Ricciardo taking provisional pole in Q3. Hadn’t heard anything like that before, except for Brazil in 2008 when there was the huge cheering as Massa crossed the line followed by the amazing collective groan when Hamilton finished in 5th.

  52. H.Guderian says:

    Good idea from Ferrari (to shift the focus away of THEIR problems).

  53. AfterLife says:

    It is not economic to just cancel the new rules. So let’s find out the solution.

    My recommendations:
    *Allow 110 kilogram fuel instead of 100 kilogram, so drivers can push to the limit.
    *There will be some tricks to increase the noise. Just ask the power unit engineers.

    Problem solved :)

  54. K Srini says:

    Feedback for Ferrari ‘Fire Stephano Do…. whatever’. Please fire the useless leader bring in a Ross Brawn!

  55. Richard Piers says:

    Much too soon to start asking for emotional responses.
    Ferrari have designed an ugly duckling that doesn’t, once again, seem to work too well.
    When the racing really gets going,the technical challenges are more settled and there is a bit of rain to spice things up, all bar a few will be happy.
    The fuel flow meter is a necessary fitment of which too much has been made by RBR/Renault to deflect from their many issues. Noone else seems to have much of a problem.
    How many people have more than a scant knowledge of the innards of any complex mechanical assembly ?

  56. Rich C says:

    Its just ol’ 3-car Monte stirring the pot again, and pretty pointless.

  57. Justin Holden says:

    So over hearing people moan, it almost as if F1 fans are worse than Team Principles. I don’t understand why Flavio Briatore is still being quote, the guy is cheat and a lair the sport should no longer associate with him. Ferrari constantly moan if they are not winning, they seem to have this self righteous in which they think they should WIN, maybe instead of moaning how about focusing your energy on building a better car and motor. The Melbourne GP was awesome IMO, so good to see the drivers really having to work to get the most out of the cars. In regards to the sound its different and maybe not as loud but still awesome.

  58. Gavin says:

    Sound…no sound…it would all be irrelevant if we had the ten top cars fighting for position throughout the entire GP (and one or two engine explosions added in for good measure). As an F1 fan I can appreciate the technology & understand its function/reason but for the casual watcher, switching on to watch some racing, I can see why it is not that exciting. The Aussie V8 supercars are far more entertaining as a racing spectacle. So what we have in F1 is the best racing drivers in the world, sitting inside a science lab trying not to blow the lab up while proving to the world that they are good at science & technology. Seems a bit of a waste of driving talent. If you put these same drivers in karts and sent them racing I would suggest that it would be very entertaining. The positive thing about these cars is they look very tricky to drive well out of corners which gave us a glimpse of the talent behind the wheel. If nothing else this needs to be focused on by the TV producers along with on board mics that amplify the exhaust note and maybe alter its pitch. This may seem a bit ‘fake’ but no more than DRS. This would satisfy the TV audience & be relatively easy to do.

    1. Timmay says:

      There won’t be a TV audience in 2 years time if the fans at the circuit stop showing up next year… It all starts with the spectacle on the ground being worth watching & paying for

  59. Tim S says:

    I think the fuel limit is a great idea because it leaves a wide-open trade space for innovation which prevents the power units from being carbon copies. But I think the regs should stop there. Why limit fuel, then also limit fuel flow, rpm, displacement, etc., etc.? If a power unit revs to 18,000 rpm and can still be competitive with the fuel allotted, then why ban it? That would create diversity in the cars that we have not seen for years (outside of a few aero elements).

    1. Voodoopunk says:

      Agree completely.

      Fuel limit is a great idea.

      Fuel flow limit? not so much.

    2. darren w says:

      Other than the fact that Red Bull got disqualified for purposely and stubbornly exceeding the fuel flow limit, what noticeable difference does the fuel flow regulation have on the racing?

      Once this issue gets sorted we won’t even know the rule exists from a racing perspective.

  60. John says:

    I am sorry James but this Survey did not get to the core of the issues facing F1 now. No mention of engine noise or fuel saving.

    Are they taking this seriously?

  61. Doug says:

    I liked the sound!
    It’s so complex & macho..if you want to hear a girly scream go to a 1 Direction gig! :-)
    I love the sound of the tyres and the complex Turbo/Electronic sound. The fact that lessons learnt from F1 can now be applied to road cars is just the icing on the cake.
    Wake up people…it’s the furure!

    1. Voodoopunk says:

      “Wake up people…it’s the furure!”

      It’s boring.

      1. marc says:

        In your opinion vodoopunk but its good that all fans have an opinion and from what I read that opinion seems very split after just 1 race so in my opinion I’m giving it a few races. I liked the ambient noise aspect but understand the noise is not the same and is an aspect of the show but isn’t the only part.

      2. Voodoopunk says:

        Yes, in my opinion, I would never speak for anyone else.

  62. George says:

    Sad to see the cars running v6 turbos, I think its wrong on many levels I also think the abundant introduction of regulation kills the race.

  63. Doug says:

    I liked the sound!
    It’s so complex & macho..if you want to hear a girly scream go to a 1 Direction gig! :-)
    I love the sound of the tyres and the complex Turbo/Electronic sound. The fact that lessons learnt from F1 can now be applied to road cars is just the icing on the cake.
    Wake up people…it’s the future!

  64. Burt Puttocks says:

    The survey was pretty poor, Like or dislike and not much in between.

    The sound is awful, especially as they are no where near 15000 rpm, it reminds me of when I moved from a petrol car to diesel.

  65. Paul H says:

    I haven’t been overly fond of the idea of the new rules but it is too early to get a proper idea of their impacts. We need a few races so that the opinion can be properly objective. We always knew the cars would be quieter, why the sudden knee jerk reaction? If the racing was close nobody would care.

    Overtaking is an annual topic but it will never improve until their is a reduced emphasis on aero. The addition of DRS has not helped matters – why risk out-breaking someone when you can simply cruise by on the straight with DRS. Especially if the overtake puts you in a position where the car you just went past can cruise by you with the benefit of DRS.

    Fuel and tyre management have been a part of racing since racing became serious. Yet despite these the cars get faster every year (maybe not straight away but by end of the season they will be). Short of making it a spec-aero formula none of this will change.

  66. Lee says:

    My own survey below:

    Ferrari think that F1 is-
    A) Their own private championship
    B) Lucky to have them
    C) Smaller, and less important than they are
    D) All of the above

  67. mw says:

    At least Paul Hembrey can get some peace and quiet like the rest of us.

    1. Random 79 says:

      He has got to be one of the happiest men on the planet right now :)

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        He’s probably tired.

      2. Random 79 says:

        Looks like we already have a candidate for the biggest pun of 2014 :)

      3. Rich C says:

        +1

        Very punny.

  68. Shri says:

    I would say let a few races go by and then make judgement.

  69. Byron Lamarque says:

    It’s possible that this years F1 is giving fans a window into fuel strategy that previously went unnoticed and unreported. Less fuel has always been the objective from what I understand as additional weight is a lap time killer.

    It’s to bad that no one seems to be able to give a really adequate laymens explanation for why fuel flow needs to be restricted.

    Reading between the lines it feels like there was concern that the electric motors would be utilized purely for efficiency if restrictions weren’t put in place to handicap the gas engines ability to give additional boost with higher fuel flow.

    This however is only a guess based on the somewhat cryptic information that is currently available to the fans of the sport. Perhaps Red Bull was aware of this communication failing when they decided to ignore the FIA and in the process bring this all to light under the spotlight of revoking an Australians podium finish at the Australian Grand Prix.

    No doubt there are currently winners and losers with the current technology. Perhaps some of the losers are looking to find an advantage. From the sounds of it, no pun intended, Ferrari has a heavy underpowered water cooled turbo engine and Red Bull might need every point they can get.

    You have to give it to Mercedes for having gotten it right right off the bat. I only hope that all the bad press that’s being generated by everyone else doesn’t hurt the sport to badly this year. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could all embrace the future when it comes knocking : )

    1. James Clayton says:

      “I only hope that all the bad press that’s being generated by everyone else doesn’t hurt the sport to badly this year.”

      I wouldn’t worry too much. When has there ever been a year that F1 *didn’t* get bad press. Never seems to do much damage to ‘the brand’. Which is probably why grossly unpopular rules never get changed.

  70. Mark says:

    If they’d won last Sunday and got a 1-2 podium wouldn’t be seeing this lol

    Sour sour grapes again when they’re midfield.

    Engines need to be a little more load and fierce but overall it could be the best F1 in years.

  71. MrF1 says:

    Four thing’s id change”

    Increase noise level
    Remove fuel flow limit
    Change nose design
    Remove DRS

  72. Jon says:

    I find it quite ironic that, of all the teams, Ferrari would be the one to complain about this new engine-led formula. Enzo Ferrari himself once claimed that “aerodynamics are for people who can’t build engines”. Now Ferrari have the opportunity to put themselves at the forefront of engine technology, but they seemingly want to revert to older, less relevant power trains.

    Looking at the results of Ferrari’s polls so far – they’re not getting the results they’re after, with (at the time of writing) majorities saying they enjoyed it and could understand it. F1 fans tend to be an intelligent, inquisitive sort – it’s in the nature of the sport to discover/observe latest technical developments in testing or race by race. I don’t actually appreciate Bernie and Flavio thinking that they have to talk down to me for me to understand!

    I grew up with sound of the V10 era – and I’ll never forget hearing my first F1 car in the flesh (Gaston Mazzacane’s 2000 Minardi down Hangar Straight). I remember being a bit disappointed with the sound of the V8s, which just lacked that extra bit of top end. But I got used to them.

    Formula One is not “pandering to the greens” or becoming a “social” formula (although I’m not entirely sure what that means). What it is doing is putting itself at the very forefront of automotive technology. THAT is entirely the point of F1. It’s the reason why F1 is not a one-car formula, so that competition accelerates development. Design capitalism. Survival of the fittest.

    The noise will take a bit of getting used to, but as long as the sport is astounding me with superb racing and technical creativity then I’ll keep watching.

    The world has changed. If F1 had not reacted, at best we’d be seen as Luddites compared to other series. At worst, we may not have even had a sport to watch in 10 years.

    1. David in Sydney says:

      +1

      I grew up with sound of the V10 era – and I’ll never forget hearing my first F1 car walking towards the Albert Park circuit with a grin from ear to ear and the hairs on my neck standing on end.

      I also remember being a bit disappointed with the sound of the V8s.

      I love the new engines – the sound is not as good as the hybrid LMS cars – I suspect it’s all down the the single exhaust and lower RPM.

  73. Andy says:

    I doubt Ferrari would be conducting a survey if they had won last weekend.

    As for Briatore complaining about fuel saving, it has become common in recent seasons to hear a team tell a driver to conserve fuel during a race because the team had taken the decision to deliberately underfuel him, so it’s nothing new.

    The new power units are cutting edge technology, isn’t that what F1′s all about, not using an engine that’s years old because it sounds good. With only a single turbo allowed, attached to a motor generation unit, a reduced rev limit and software designed to optimise the power unit with fuel consumption in mind, what did people think it was going to sound like?

    If they were to shorten the races, I would put money on the fact that some teams would still under fuel. The England cricket team has been in decline because they have so many backroom staff analysing things and coming up with strategies to the point where players are losing the ability to think for themselves. Some F1 teams are heading the same way, alot of number crunching is taking them away from the obvious.

    1. C63 says:

      +1 on all your comments, apart from the bit about cricket – not saying you are wrong, just that I know very little about the game :-)

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        Test cricket is fantastic, the one day and completely daft/stupid/brainless 20/20 nonsense is a blight.

  74. Craig says:

    This quasi hybrid/electric F1 thing can’t last more than 2 years. The fan base erosion will pull the rug out from under it. For sure, the American market won’t buy into these little toy cars running around for very long. I know I wouldn’t pay the 3 or 4 hundred seat price to attend with these scaled down science class experiments. It wouldn’t come as a surprise to see New Jersey back right out of it. The FIA has Formula E. If they’re going to have Formula Hybrid, now they also need a Formula 1. Can you imagine NasCar going hybrid? They’d be flogged with corn dogs. F1 should have gone exactly 180 degrees from where they’ve headed. They should have made the new formula 3-litre screaming V-12′s, normally aspirated, there are other ways to control the speed if that’s what they’re worried about. Ticket sales to watch hybrid toy cars just won’t support F1 in this format. Let Formula E showcase that kind of technology, and just let F1 be what it is supposed to be. There is no need to put a choke-hold on 22 cars. The world has already gone massively hybrid in passenger cars for years and years so there is no need for F1 to show anybody this current gong show because this technology is already in use worldwide. What was the FIA thinking???

    1. Voodoopunk says:

      “The fan base erosion will pull the rug out from under it.”

      Very true.

    2. marc says:

      I don’t agree with you but your line about the corn dogs made me smile

    3. DC says:

      I have been a fan of F1 since Niki Lauda and Alain Prost drove together at McLaren and there have been seasons where I haven’t missed a single race, so I would consider myself pretty much a hard core fan. And I am more excited about this new formula than I have been in last 15-20 years. So much for fan base erosion. The only thing that needs to be sorted fast are the ugly noses. I reserve my opinion on DRS till later in the season.

      1. Voodoopunk says:

        “I have been a fan of F1 since Niki Lauda and Alain Prost drove together at McLaren”

        I remember it well.

        “And I am more excited about this new formula than I have been in last 15-20 years.”

        I’m exactly the opposite.

  75. Nano says:

    What a crap survey. I thought it would at least bring up the question of the volume, but to have 5 questions like “did i like the race” yes/no is just lazy.

    I honestly cant figure out the point, they will not get any meaningful data out of it.

  76. BoogWar says:

    And for those who don’t / didn’t understand the above statement, it simply means (said in Jamaican) that I have foregone f1 and started boning up on NASCAR. Awoah.

  77. Micheal says:

    I personally really liked the race. I like the sound. It’s different, it’s change, but F1 has to constantly evolve, and because it’s F1 it needs to evolve before the rest of the world is ready, otherwise it gets criticised for being behind and irrelevant. I personally love the fact the cars are on the edge of technology and that the drivers are having to really drive again now with having so much torque. F1 is not perfect and it never has been and it never will be. If you didn’t enjoy the race on Sunday, then you’re watching for the wrong reason.

    1. DC says:

      +1. New formula is making cars difficult to drive again and this should be applauded.

  78. James says:

    I’d like to let this season play out before we make any judgements. But upping the revs to 20,000 would help with the noise and adjusting the over restrictive fuel supply demands seem very achievable while still maintaining this image of forward thinking innovation. Let them race, the FULL race. It’s ridiculous otherwise.

    My biggest suggestion to Ferrari is fix that god-awful looking nose you glued to the front of your car.

  79. Al Leavitt says:

    I keep feeling that much of the dissatisfaction with the sound of F1 being expressed by the fans is in part a result of Bernie’s ongoing whining about the new power units. I wonder if the threats coming from the Austrailian promoters were simply orchestrated by Bernie to support his campaign. Please get this man a hearing aid.

  80. Carlos Marques says:

    Isn’t it a bit too late to be asking these questions now? I mean, what can anyone change at this point based on fan feedback? This same feedback was voiced (and ignored) months before Melbourne happened.

    The cars are ugly and sound terrible in my opinion. Want to know what a real F1 car should sound like? Listen to this and tell me if you don’t get goosebumps -> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPONLgIrHKI&t=8m51s

    The sound of an F1 car is everything; people will turn up to listen to one ->
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrhxXob2C4

    1. Rich C says:

      The FIA will probably penalize him now for driving outside the lines.

  81. relaxdtv says:

    Dull races, no F1 sound, slow cars, no longer EPIC, no real racing..if they used that tag line to advertise F1 how many people do you think would tune in?

    Just like in the movies, the studios have to listen to the public or their out of business.

    F1, bring back the sound, bring back the sound, bring back the cars to the mid late 80′s or early / mid 1990′s or have your TV numbers and people at the event dwindle to such a point that F1 is kaput.

    Honestly as a 27 year old it is the point for me of apathy to F1, sad to say for me, why would I watch something that just isn’t interesting.

  82. Ben says:

    Turning up the sound on the TV needs to be done for the next race. I was at Albert Park and I enjoyed the sound of the cars, still loud when they all go by on the first lap, then during the race I could actually have a conversation and not wear ear plugs, it was great! But when I watched the race again on TV at home, you could barely hear the cars at all!

    1. Nick says:

      You can have a conversation anytime. Once a year for 90 minutes I want to be thinking ‘wow, this is so crazy awesome, these cars are just insane!’

      I would say I’m only a semi interested V8 supercar fan but they got me more excited over the weekend than F1 did.

  83. Chris says:

    I guess I’m in the minority, but I like “quiet F1″ and may actually attend a race this year because of that. I also like the amazingly complex hybrid nature of the cars. I’ve been a fan for 30+ years and this is the beginning of exciting new era. It seemed like the cars were a real handful for the first time in a long time. If anything, reduce the dependence on aero even more, and it will only get better.

    1. neilmurg says:

      you’re part of the quieter majority

  84. Steve says:

    For me sound is not number 1 although it is important. The worst problem is that the drivers are not able to show their true potential because of the limits the rules put on the cars and drivers.

    To me the worst thing to hear is a drive radio to the pit about fuel consumption or tire wear.

    This sport was all about going as fast as the
    cars were able to go. It is not about that any more which to me says it it is not the pinnacle
    of motor sports any more. Since the introduction of tyres that would not last F1 has lost it’s way. They are pandering to people who don’t realize what F1 is suppose to be.

    I got board of watching the season opener and decided to watch one of the greatest drives you will ever see.Michael Schumacher’s 4 stop French GP victory. He had to drive most of the race like each lap was a qualifying lap because of a strategy change. It was magical to watch. This is what the F1 spectacle is suppose to be about. With things going the way they are now that spectacle is gone.

    I also don’t care if a driver gets disqualified after a race for rules infractions. If the rules are broken then that is the offenders fault It is much worse if
    nothing is done and the results stand and the cheating is revealed at a later date.

    The rules are not to complicated and the average race fan doe not know them all so as long as everyone follows the rules the fans are happy. Rules like the fuel flow have been around forever and most fans don’t know they are there except when the rules broken in a race and there is a penalty.

    The size of the engine does not mater but the speed the cars can go does. If a car can only go at 80% because of the rules restrictions then you don’t need the best drivers in the world because they can never use all their talent to get the best out of the car.
    Give the cars a decent amount for fuel and tires that don’t fall apart and everything will be fine again and F1 will be F1 again.

    1. PeterG says:

      “This sport was all about going as fast as the
      cars were able to go. It is not about that any more”

      F1 was never actually about that as far as the races went. Drivers were never driving flat out, They were always managing fuel/tyres or car reliability.

      The view from some fans that F1 races were about driving flat out in the past is simply wrong.

      1. PeterG says:

        As to Schumacher’s 2004 French Gp drive.

        That was one of the worse RACES in F1′s history from a racing standpoint.
        Yes the 4-stop strategy was interesting from a strategy perspective, But watching the 2 drivers fighting for the win separated by 10-15 seconds on different strategies with the pass been done in the pits rather than on the track made the race boring & highlighted much of what was wrong with the refueling-era. Racing done in the pits via strategy rather than the racing been done on the racetrack.

  85. Christos Pallis says:

    Okay so I love F1 and I jumped at the chance to complete the survey BUT trust Ferrari to not ask the relevant questions or even a relevant question.

    Q1 – did you enjoy the engine sound?

    Q2 – what did you think of the volume of the noise?

    Q3 – did you like the new look of F1 in 2014 as a technical change to previous season?

    Q4 – is Kimi going to spend the second half of 2014 eating icecream?

  86. Carlos Marques says:

    James,

    Would you consider conducting a more meaningful and relevant survey on your website? I suggest you wait until the fly-away races are complete. This will give everyone a chance to think it over and decide if they like it after all, or really hate it and will switch over to Nascar!

    Cheers

    1. Elie says:

      Good call and thanks James for taking it on

  87. Andrew Carter says:

    Far too soon for this. Just as Australia 2009 wasn’t particularly indicative of the following 5 years of racing, I doubt Ausie 2014 will be for the rest of this formula’s life time.

  88. Darth_patate says:

    This survey is the latest evidence for me that the F14T is a failure.

    we had so far :

    -Alonso saying “i did what i could”, “i just drive the car” –> he has learned from last year so he is telling it “softly” but it seems to me his attitude says he is desappointed in the car

    -Stefano copy/paste his usual “we need to work on teh car we need to improve” “this is not ferrari standing blablblabla

    -Luca complaining about the rules , warning about competition

    all of this screams of damage controland trying to find excuse

    the next step : williams ahead of ferrari in malaysia and Luca calling an emergency meeting in maranello to motivate the team (using a Ronspeak to italian translator) and promises that we will get a F14T in barcelona that is going to put them back on course for the champioships because “we are ferrari a great team and can’t accept this blablablabla”

    so, 2001, 2012 and 2013 all over again

    Or I could be wrong…I hope but …

    1. David in Sydney says:

      I think Ferrari knew it had no change of a Championship in 2014 after seeing the Mercedes in action; that’s why they chose to call the Ferrari a Fiat.

      :-)

    2. Krischar says:

      You are cent % correct mate

      Except ‘Or I could be wrong…I hope but”

      Ferrari car is complete tosh and the gap to mercedes is not recoverable for this season atleast

      Alonso please leave this useless team and find a competitive team / car to bag the WDC again

      HIstory / past glory does not gurantee the WDC in the near future

  89. greg says:

    The noise is poor and will take more away trackside than on tv and with the engine set up the sound isn’t going to get louder.
    The FIA should of given the teams the fuel pump and pipe so everyone was equal, forget the flow sensors that complicate it. Let the teams decide if they want the extra fuel to race or less to pace themselves, but throw in a bonus of a free engine to the drivers who finish in the top 5, 5 races in succession or simlar and give them the incentive to push.

    1. Timmay says:

      That artificial rule should lock Marussia firmly into last place, good thinking scrub.

  90. deancassady says:

    The new direction is a long term strategy, and we are in the early, early days of it.
    The specifications driving this year’s rules are a challenge to the traditional, internal combustion-centric mind-set.
    And most of the people who can afford to participate are relics from that era, an era which can not be sustained very much longer, in fact, we have only an illusion of the post-war petroleum ‘free-energy’.
    Here in Canada, or dictator has courted world petroleum giants to come in and destroy an entire region, larger than Great Britain, including a very significant fresh-water river.
    In a very short number of years, that commodity, DRINKABLE WATER, will be much more expensive that gasoline.
    As always, the reactionaries whine incessantly; it is already well past tedious.
    The time for such a discussion is, at earliest, after the very initial teething phases, perhaps over the summer break.
    Let’s wait and see how it goes.

  91. Wade Parmino says:

    If they start artificially altering the sound to ‘boost’ it on TV, what next, CGI races? This path better not be taken. I’d rather the cars sounded like lawn mowers.

  92. erik says:

    Sidenote- 2013 Vettel 1st; 2014 Vettel last

  93. erik says:

    after first lap of course

  94. David in Sydney says:

    Hmmm… This is very telling, isn’t it?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS4Dh_EAfJI&feature=youtu.be

    But still, I did prefer the V10s.

  95. David in Sydney says:

    Actually I wonder what the impact has been from the single exhaust versus the new engine?

    I’m no sound engineer but I’d guess the exhaust has a lot to do with the muted sound in 2014 v 2013 and earlier.

  96. lee says:

    RE Formula One
    What has happened to the “Masters of Speed in Formula One”.
    They have been given electric wheelchairs.
    Is not Formula One the pinnacle of “speed and fast”.
    Is not Formula One to race flat out from start to finish no matter what
    Is not Formula One supposed to be loud and shake your body with engines about to explode
    Why do we have tyres that can’t go the distance and don’t provide grip for drivers after 5 laps.
    Let’s just have one set of hard tires that makes 80% of race distance and one mandatory tire change . Get rid of soft altogether and of course have wets when it rains (my cost saving idea to formula one ).
    Why do we have fuel saving in a Formula One Race they spend 100’s of millions to save a few dollars on fuel (no sense), having to slow down to save fuel is not racing. Have the greenies taken over Formula One. Let them have a electric car race for all for themselves.
    Why do we have different front wings? Let’s level the field, every team to have the same front wing and ok make it adjustable. Stops also the aero game and huge costs for all teams so they can buy fuel.
    Level the field for all teams for a fair flat out REAL race and position fight.
    Why get penalised for a gearbox change or engine change (get rid of that rule). Give the teams ten engines and gearboxes then its equal in performance all year.
    If a formula one driver has to back off for fuel or tires and can’t go flat out ITS NOT RACING.
    And for god’s sacke any fee to air TV that puts ads on during the race should be limited by contract to F1. Five minutes before and five minutes after the race that’s it. (don’t think that one will fly but worth a try)
    Forgive typos etc –I am mad and hate what the idiots have done to the sport

  97. Goldy says:

    Alonso plz move to another team, Ferrari has become the biggest whiners in F1 paddock. Glory days they had wid Micheal r never going to repeat.

  98. Anthony Mazzeo says:

    I attended all 3 days at Aus GP and the sound was horrible trackside which ruined whole weekend for me ( I have attended every race since 1996)

    To sum up people flocked to see the F1 Demonstration event where a 2010? V8 Red Bull raced against a Merc street car and V8 Touring Car

    This event had most people flocking to see it – (most people around me commented said they want to hear real F1 sound)

    In previous years nobody barely cared for this event

    A lot of people here comment they thought sound was fine on TV I say attend a race live and you will be horrified how badly this affects the spectacle

    I personally pay money to see cars\ drivers being pushed to the limit – not a fuel economy race

    I also don’t understand the whole relevance to F1 must have to road cars – I don’t drive suburban streets going 300 km per hour

    1. chris says:

      Agree. We were on turn 1. Best bit of video I got was of DC in the RB7; makes me smile every time I see it. I think the reason I like it is more complex than just the noise it makes. A bit like the F18 fly over, the sense of raw energy and power somehow feels great. The new cars just don’t give the same feeling.

    2. JohnBt says:

      [I also don’t understand the whole relevance to F1 must have to road cars – I don’t drive suburban streets going 300 km per hour]

      EXACTLY! totally no relevance.

    3. Nick says:

      Agree 100%. This was the first time I’ve ever waited around for the speed comparisons.

  99. PeterG says:

    People go on about how F1 doesn’t sound like F1 now, Well what exactly is the sound of F1?
    F1′s had many different engine regulations & many different sounds, Some louder than others.

    In terms of performance the new V6 turbo’s with all there energy recovery technology are just as fast as the V8′s, They have brought back the spectacle of watching drivers fighting with the cars, Having to really watch there throttle application.
    F1 has not really seen that since the 80′s & I for 1 am loving it.

    I’d take these more challenging to drive, Quieter engines over the dull/flat/easier to manage but really loud V8s.

    Also people go on & on about drivers not been able to drive flat out all race. Well when have they ever driven flat out all race?
    People say ‘when refueling was around’ but that isn’t true, They were still managing fuel/tyres back then to optimise there race strategy & save there equipment.

    There was a handful of races in the past (Both Pre/post refueling) where a driver or 2 in a battle drove flat out for all or part of a race, But that was the exception & not the rule which is why those few races races (Hungary ’98, Suzuka ’00 for example) stand out more.

    The tyre/fuel management is no different now to what its always been & always will be. Trying to make out like its something new, Or worse this year is utterly & factually incorrect!

  100. German Samurai says:

    Look at what Hulkenberg does time and again with substandard machinery.

    Instead, Ferrari went with Raikkonen who was comprehensively beaten by Grosjean in the second half of 2013. They stick with Alonso who struggled to beat Massa in qualifying last year.

    1. Elie says:

      Grosjean couldn beat an egg into cream..Kimi beat him both years even without racing the last 2 races..Alonso beat Massa all four years. Stop talking jibberish

  101. Marcelo Leal says:

    I would really like to see the drivers flat out, as many of the F1 fans out there. The utopic equal capable car, with no restrictions, would be my choice to see what driver would win… I do think would be the fastest, well, different from these days where cars are much different and artificial devices are added to complicate things.
    That being said, I think last year was the worst, as it added really “artificial” subject (tyres), to just try to make the sport competitive. There is no evidence to provide evolution to road cars in that tyre rule… I mean, obviously it can have, but is not something I think we have as a priority on our road cars. And, besides that, I could see many viewers that were pro that rule. So..
    In this year, I understand totally different the new rules, as they seem to have a deep relationship with road cars, responsibility, and etc. The sound is a consequence of the change in the engine, but is something that will make F1 possible in the years ahead. I’m afraid if the sport does nothing about it, will be really difficult to defend such aggresive sport (for the environment). Last year we had some people from greenpeace in one race I do not recall which one…
    In a nutshell, I would prefer to watch the driver I support flat out against the others, no doubt… But between an “artificial” rule and rules trying to make the sport more adherent to these days, I prefer the actual rules.
    ps: actually last year rubber on the tracks was actually worst from the environment, and the blow outs dangerous for the drivers. A horror show…

  102. ferggsa says:

    I have been following F1 since the 1960 (long before most of you were even born) so I feel entitled to express an opinion

    The main problem with current F1 is that, as with most aspects of life, you can not please everybody
    Some fans would love to have 5 liter V12s, others think it would be overkill, some want as little restrictions as possible, just let them race, others think rules should be stricter so cars are more equal

    F1 has been mostly a combination of state of the art cars and talented drivers, and the FIA which is supposed to issue rules and limits to allow for a level playing field for the sport (as opposed to the show)

    I think this still holds true, anyone who tells me getting 600bhp out of a 1.6 liter engine while using only 100kg of fuel for a 300km race is not high tech, has no clue of what the engineering behind this requires

    If they are noisy or not is actually irrelevant to the sport (not to the show, however), and as most things, subjective
    As someone already mentioned, we moved from hard rock to jazz, I for one will enjoy it, instead of complaining

    In the old days cars broke up, mixing the results, now the show needs degrading tires and fuel limits to have a similar effect
    Fangio and Senna had to nurse engines, gearboxes and yes, tyres to get to the finish line, now Alonso and Vettel need to nurse fuel and yes, tyres to get there
    This variables add to strategy calls from the pit wall, which imho is fun to follow and gives JAonF1 a reason for being

    I dont love DRS but without it passing would be almost impossible if cars are fairly level, the option is to ban wings, and then fans would complain because they miss wings, Vettel would cry because he cant drive the car and Newey would be out of a job

    F1 is not about the best driver in similar cars, go watch gp3 or karts for that
    It is not about loud V8s and crashes, go watch Nascar
    It is not about the highest speeds on track, go watch Indy

    F1 is about the best driver, car, team combination, which usually does not result in as close racing as we would like it to be, not now, not in the past

    This season might be fun to watch not because the cars will be closely matched, but because for a long time, the drivers are closely matched
    Imho the worst offender has not been DRS or Pirelli but no.2 drivers which are not allowed to race their mates
    Even if Alonso and Kimi end up 6 and 7 because the Ferrari is no match for the Mercs, they should have a good fight between them, and same goes for Mercedes and Williams and Macs and it seems, even RBs

    As for Bernies and Lucas comments, they are the 2 most influential guys in F1s history, they should have spoken beforehand or shut up now

    PS. A note on RBs DSQ
    Using their own fuel sensor would be like saying to FIA, we found out your Pirellis blow out and degrade, so we used our Michelins instead

    1. Darth_patate says:

      I agree with most of your post (even the “i wasn’t born in 1960″).

      On the sound part, i am a TV fan, i have been only to 2 GPs( Magny cours 2001 and 2006) and yes the most different thing from watching on TV was the sound. SO I understand that is 2014 cars sound just like the porsche racing that was before the F1 back then, it’s a desapointment.

      My suggestion is that FIA should give some regulatory room to teams to allow them to tune the sound of the engine…i am sure engineers will like the challenge and marketing-wise and fan-wise the car that manages the best “roar” will be popular

    2. JohnBt says:

      Worthy comments I admit.

      1. ferggsa says:

        thanks, you made my day

  103. Racyboy says:

    It’s one race for focaccia’s sake… Always with the knee-jerk reactions.

    By Turn 3 I forgot they were ugly, after the first lap I didn’t care what they sounded like.
    They’re still quick and they are still driven by the best.
    The only thing that really annoyed me on Sunday was the length of time it took the FIA to DSQ RBR/Ric.

    If RBR were warned about fuel consumption after the first 5 laps, with further warnings thoughout the race, shouldn’t the FIA officials have been standing by to slap them with their DSQ as soon as they crossed the line?

    1. g says:

      “The only thing that really annoyed me on Sunday was the length of time it took the FIA to DSQ RBR/Ric.

      If RBR were warned about fuel consumption after the first 5 laps, with further warnings thoughout the race, shouldn’t the FIA officials have been standing by to slap them with their DSQ as soon as they crossed the line?”

      The FIA waited because they wanted to download the data directly from the car’s ECU. Once they did that & confirmed there findings Red Bull were arguing the case & using there own data to support it which also took time to look over.

      There’s a pre-defined process in the regulations

  104. Racyboy says:

    Off Topic

    James,
    Have you heard any talk in F1 circles and the FIA in particular regarding the Russian GP?

    With the US and the EU imposing sanctions on certain Russian interests,with possibly more to come, I was wondering if the GP might be in jeopardy?

    I imagine Todt and Co are hoping the Crimean situation blows over by October.
    If it doesn’t though, it’s not a good look to be supporting a regime that has resorted to annexing neighbouring territories.

  105. sergiu says:

    They better build a grand prix winning car and not wasting the time on stuf like that. Being an Alonso fan i am tired to watch how this cr•••py car is killing his time.

  106. Craig D says:

    Regarding the last question:
    “In Sepang, which team will have the closest matched drivers in terms of points?”

    I find it odd there isn’t more votes for Williams. If you think about it, Mercedes *should* get a 1-2, giving their drivers a 7 point difference. Williams could very well be the second best team. If they came 3rd and 4rd, that’s only a 3 point difference.

    Of course, like Melbourne, there’s likely to be a few upsets!

  107. Alexis says:

    That survey asks you pretty much nothing??

  108. Andrew says:

    Typical F1 to ask for feedback after the event and not ask for fans opnions before it happened. Everyone signed up to the new rules and now you get people like Wolff you say that we need to remember the fans!

  109. Ravi says:

    Ferrari should first focus on their performance, which has been sub-par for over 4 years now. Barring some excellent driving by Alo, Ferrari as a team have been under performing for a long time.

    Get your act together first, then bother asking fans about the F1 spectacle. Maybe ask the Fans “What do you think about the Ferrari performance” !

  110. Elie says:

    One race has been run and Ferrari are already producing “surveys” over a formula that has been in planning for over 3 years now. Desperate times call for desperate measures !

    As fans we love the noise F1 emits I never wore earplugs at previous GP’s -( probably only Top Fuelers). I like the sound, but I also like the sound of the new cars maybe more so than that tinny pitchy- of course Id like a little more. Patience is called for -the cars are still vey fast, the competition is close- much closer than most anticipated and we constantly forget how good the worlds best engineers are at improving things that are so damn new!

    By the end of this year the cars will be more fuel efficient, faster and far better handling with more downforce. Maybe as much 2 seconds faster. If Mercedes already dont have fuel issues in the first and worst race for fuel consumption why would it get any worse ?. Perhaps ( read most likely) the FIA will need to modify the rules to allow a little more noise – & by that I mean real noise – dual exhausts a few more revs- keep in mind the power units will be more efficient by then. No fake rubbish! Same way perhaps the specs for next year will allow a more gradual tapering of the nose cone .

    But these are minor things and all developments that we see continually achieved in F1. Perhaps the noise issue is something that can be tackled by the Technical / Strategy committee before the summer break but I dont see anything drastically wrong with the racing and the regulations – they are the same for everyone and its usually only the same culprits whining anyway.

  111. Femi Akins says:

    Ferrari! Cant even design a decent survey.

    Except I did some wrong the only question I was asked was ‘Do you like this Formula1?’ Yes/No. For starters its binary so no room for the undecideds like me and no way of finding out why. Plus a broad question like Do you like this Formula1 means nothing and can be used for nothing.

    Pretty crude like all their recent car designs.

  112. James McNulty says:

    I am fully on board with the new greener technology. I go the Le Mans every year and I actually like the sound of the Hybrid diesel cars and they are near silent.

    What bothers me is that F1 is becoming more like the WEC.

    In F1 drivers should be flat out for the full race distance, not managing their tyres, fuel, KERS etc. Drivers should be able to use everything to the maximum, no conservation. Otherwise we should relabel F1 as the open wheeled WEC!

  113. Vic says:

    F1 is the pinnacle of motorsport, I therefore want to see everyone pushing as hard as they can, the drivers, engine makers, car makers, tyre makers etc.

    To make things fair, the less well funded teams should get some form of help in order for them not to fall behind.

    Vic

    1. Rich C says:

      No, it isn’t. That would be LeMans Prototypes.

      F1 is the pinnacle of “if you can’t beat ‘em, litigate ‘em”.

  114. Paul Mc says:

    Forget the noise issue, 13 years ago Schumacher’s pole position time was 1:26:892, in 2014 no one could do a lap in the dry in the late 1 minute 20s. 13 years! What other sport looks back 13 years and sees a better sport? The cars are visually too slow, no one looks to be on the edge at any point. F1 has had an identity crisis for a number of years. What is F1? Is it still the fastest racing machines with the best drivers going flat out on the best tracks in the world? Not anymore.

    1. Goob says:

      No – it’s grab the money and pretend everything is alright.

      There is not a single driver or journalist who address the nightmare that F1 is…

      Just look at the way Vettel is booed… WDC has been devalued beyond belief… a WDC has no meaning anymore, its a worthless credential.

    2. PeterG says:

      “no one looks to be on the edge at any point.”

      Were you ever watching the Melbourne Gp?

      They all looked to be on edge all weekend, Cars sliding around, Wheelspin, Drivers fighting for control, Tapping the walls, Near misses with the wall & locking up/running wide.

      So what if lap times were slower 13 years ago, 2004 was the most boring season in F1′s history. Sure the cars were the fastest they had ever been performance wise but they couldn’t race & the cars had so much grip that they never really looked ‘on edge’ because they were never moving around under braking, cornering or acceleration.
      The racing was boring, The cars were ugly with all there flip-ups/winglets & the overall spectacle was lacking.

      “best drivers going flat out ”

      When in F1′s history have the drivers ever been driving flat out in the races?

      Answer is they never have, Tyre/fuel/car management has always been something the drivers have had to to.

      Fans are looking after something that F1 has never been & never will be.

      1. PeterG says:

        “So what if lap times were slower 13 years ago”

        Should read slower THAN 13 years ago.

  115. simon mawdsley says:

    having only ever been to one GP (Barcelona last year) i can say that the spectacle is, well, i’d rather watch it on telly. BUT, the noise, THE NOISE!!! unless you’ve experienced it, you cannot describe it. it is like lucifer yelling at you! the noise makes up 75% of the spectacle in my view…so i really feel for the fans.

    There was a lot of truth in what flavio said. When we think of great drivers like Schumacher, Senna or Hamilton, we think about them being on the edge not for one flying lap in Q3, but every single lap of the race. whether the audience can see that is largely irrelevant. I cannot see that Usain Bolt runs a 9.77, but i know that he is pushing 100%, and that knowledge adds to the ‘wow’ factor. driving to a delta to save fuel is no different to being held at the station to regulate gaps in the service. the untrained eye cannot always see if a driver is on the limit the whole time, but being told that he is adds to the spectacle, gives is something to talk about the next day, gives us a laymans ability to distinguish between the drivers. And while we all suspect that driving to a delta requires vast skill, it doesn’t require the same skill as being 2s a lap quicker around monaco as your team mate…..and THAT is what the fans want to see.

    1. Voodoopunk says:

      “it is like lucifer yelling at you! ”

      I hate that, your tea’s ready, put that down, don’t do that.

    2. Goob says:

      Yup – driving to deltas is what test drivers do.

      Racers are supposed to race… period.

      What is the point of F1 these days? What is the point of a weekend where no one races?

      You can compress the highlights of modern F1 into about a 40sec video… and that’s stretching it.

      1. grat says:

        Maybe the coverage in the US is different than in the UK, but it’s been obvious since 2009 (when I started watching “the modern era” closely), that the drivers are *always* driving to a delta. The teams figure the fastest strategy for getting the car around the track, and that’s what the driver does.

        Watching the Detroit GP from 1986, Nigel Mansell passes pole sitter Aryton Senna… but a few laps later, Nigel started dropping back through the field, and the commentators felt that he’d driven too hard for his tires, and was paying the price for his earlier aggressive driving.

        Sir Stirling Moss, at Le Mans a couple years ago, said that the one thing he always hated about driving Le Mans was having to nurse the car for his entire stint, instead of racing flat out.

        Finally, Usain Bolt is a sprinter– long distance runners, however, also have to pace themselves. You start a distance race by sprinting, and you’re not going to make it to the end.

        ALL successful distance racing is about racing as slowly as possible while being faster than your opponents.

      2. Goob says:

        Current F1 is like giving Usain Bolt flippers to run in… any old clown can win – the flippers should not dictate the outcome.

  116. KARTRACE says:

    I have a solution for FA and Kimi. They have to push LDM to purchase Mercedes engines, and there you go.

  117. Sebee says:

    Anyone see Google today? :-) Nice.

  118. BHJ says:

    What they shouldve done was to design a more open engine formula.
    One example could be to restrict certains areas like max fuel consumption and the likes, and then let the manufactureres make whatever type of engine they think best suitable to race with under these resctrictions, be it a V12, V10, V8, V6, turbo, non-turbo and so on… That would´ve been interesting!

  119. audifan says:

    the sound of these new V8′s is terrible , we must have the V10′s back again !!!

    or did I imagine that being the cry ?

    funny how people hate change , and how they forget

    incidentally , double points at the last race ? mika would never have won the WDC …how wrong that would have been …let’s just hope that we don’t have a travesty like that this year before this ludicrous rule is scrapped

    how come nobody mentions the fact that for years the importance of the driver’s skill has been minimised thanks to technology , all those ferrari championships with tyres tweaked to their car , renault the same in 2005/2006 , RBR thanks to an aero genius

    well early signs are that this will be much more of a drivers championship …not enough maybe , but a step in the right direction

    not enough noise ? …as brett said , frankly my dear I don’t give a damn

    1. neilmurg says:

      Rhett

  120. Goob says:

    Don’t bother with any F1 surveys… they just ask skewed questions and ignore the results anyway…

    99% of the problems are intentionally created and fixed with fakeness e.g. DRS.

    What annoys me the most is the fact that the driver act as if they are racing and not merely being dictated too… drivers from previous generation would laugh at current F1 drivers – they would certainly question their lack of race craft… and their lack of courage to speak the truth.

  121. Freeman says:

    The sound is awful, I can’t see myself going to Silverstone this year? When you go to see a race its the sound you take away with you? Its to early to judge the racing personally I think we need a sprint race and a grand prix? hybrid technology is the future of motoring so F1 needs to following this route it will benefit us all, but something needs to be done about the sound or lack of it! Otherwise all these state of the art race tracks paying millions of pounds to host a GP will be going under due to low attendances.

  122. Kenneth M'Boy says:

    A great qualifying session but a typical Melbourne race (not the most spectacular one to watch). Being an Aussie I am obviously not a fan of fuel flow metres but will give it five races before passing too much judgement. The cars could be a bit louder but as long as the racing remains competitive than I think this will become a bit of a non issue. Hopefully Ferrari becomes more competitive because F1 is fantastic when Fernando and Kimi are battling for the lead. Looking forward to Malaysia and more controversary because it makes life interesting and gives us all something to talk about.

  123. IP says:

    Ha. Ironic that Flavio reckons he can fix it!

  124. Harvey says:

    Flashback to the Fan Forum in Montreal, June 2011, when I suggested to Whitmarsh and Boullier that no one wanted to be standing at Hangar Straight listening to something that sounded like a Volkswagen. Whitmarsh, who sadly has been booted to the barn by Dennis the Menace, expressed his feelings as a motor racing fan as well as an engineer by stating that a chill went through him every year at the first test when he heard an engine revving for the first time. Well, here we are! If Todt wants to make the cars more like commercially available models, he should go sedan racing with modified Mercedes, Ferraris, and the like. And the suggestion to shorten the races to enable the drivers to actually race? That is so totally absurd! Why not put the fuel back in the cars? The races are short enough as it is, if you get rain during practice you hardly see any cars, we’ve seen less practice in recent years because of tire management and if the engineers can’t sort out some of the elctrical and fuel issues soon many cars will sit out FP3. I believe the sport is heading toward a tipping point and action needs to be taken now. It’s only seven weeks to Spain, after that you have two oddball tracks in Monaco and Canada, and then it’s July and the party’s over.

    1. James Allen says:

      I remember that! Great Fan Forum that one!

  125. Dren says:

    I thought the race was rather good. There is a lot of strategy involved now. I remember when the only passing took place in the pits. Ferrari sounds a bit butt hurt that they did not produce a competitive car. I’m looking forward to the Red Bull vs. Mclaren vs. Williams battles.

  126. cartweel says:

    Wasn’t this sort of thing handled by FOTA in the past? Hmmmm, maybe that disbanded/useless/gutted by Ferrari and Redbull organization had some use afterall…

    F1 for me is quickly becoming much less interesting than the other series it is competing with. WEC cars is where all this hybrid stuff belongs- F1 is about going as fast as possible with an engine, some aero and no other gizmos. F1 has lost its way and is in a very sad state- and ALL parties are to blame! The FIA is responsible for these rediculous rules. Bernie is responsible for turning his back on the real fans and racing in Korea/China/the list goes on while real racing venues and fans are shut out. Finally, the teams bear the brunt of this as they are too busy in-fighting with each other and have completely missed the big picture.

    F1 fans are being taken advantage of- and that treatment of the people who pay the bills only lasts so long.

    I won’t be going to a live race this year- the last year I missed one was in 2001 I believe- it has been that long. Maybe a new fan will get my seat and fall in love with the sport…

  127. Leslie D'Amico says:

    Now after the season starts all these people want the fans input??? Little late for that!!!

    By the way Formula 1, General Motors has announced the next generation of 3 and 4 cylinder turbocharged engines to be used in their hybrid and fuel efficient cars. Guess they’re not waiting for F1 technology to trickle down to them.

    Gee, how can they do that? They don’t even race F1!

    1. Rich C says:

      “…how can they do that?”

      Easy: they cheat on the fuel flow!

      And they don’t spend a gazillion $ on insane aero tweaks because they don’t go even 100 mph.

      SO there’s your “road relevance”, FIA!

  128. JB says:

    I was hoping the survey would have a bit more detail.
    a YES/NO question is not enough.
    YES,
    - I love the new tech
    - Shuffling of teams
    - the better tyres

    No, I hate
    - the sound (the lack of it) and no I will not get over it. Just like I never got over the fact that Pirelli tyres artificially degrates from 2011 to 2013.

    - silly looking nose. I think it is an embarrassment for a TOP DOG sport to screw something up so badly.

    - F1 is not expanding into USA. Americans love their motor-racing. Stop being so arrogant and go with American culture for a bit.

    In the end, I feel there is no need to watch the race live anymore. It sounds the same as watching it on TV anyway.

    1. Rich C says:

      “…there is no need to watch the race live anymore. It sounds the same as watching it on TV anyway.”

      And on TV with the right technology you can pause it and go to the loo!

  129. neilmurg says:

    We had the builders in once, and the noise killed our pet hamster.
    With the noise of F1 as it was last year compared to this, I wondered if there were far fewer dead mammals to be picked up at the clean up of Albert Park this year?

    1. Rich C says:

      Just the hamsters that ran in their wheel all day and powered those hybrid engine things.

  130. Anand Murthy says:

    A bit of a rubbish survey, James.

    Now that Mr. LDM knows he has an overweight dead cat in hood and two tigers behind the steering wheel, would it surprise anyone one bit if Ferrari (under Mr. LDM’s ‘guidance’) used any means fair or foul (and leading questions of the “Have you stopped beating your wife lately?” variety) to shift focus (& blame) onto something other than Ferrari’s failure to produce a winning car?

    When wd they have the cojones to stand up & say, “We screwed up. So far, we’ve produced a bullock-cart (and that’s homologated for the rest of the season). Now, we’re going to devote ALL our time, energy & attention to bust our b*lls to produce atleast a horse-buggy within the next 2 races. Thank you & good night” or something to that effect.

  131. JohnBt says:

    Can’t do much for the sound but no fuel saving can save this season as fans want flat out racing not nursing the pinnacle of motorsports. Tyres are much better so no need to change.

    And Ferrari please improve asap or else Alonslow eyebrows will drop swiftly.

    Hey, I heard Bernie wants to retire, all of a sudden?

  132. Jeremy J says:

    Toto Wolff talks about the need to ‘take heed of the fans views’. I rather hope that doesn’t actually mean ‘take heed of the views of those who jump up and down and complain the loudest (about something new that isn’t what they’re used to)’.

    I’ve been watching F1 my whole life (my first memory is Nelson Piquet driving towards me at Brands Hatch) and I thoroughly enjoyed Australia. I liked, really liked, being able to hear the atmosphere of the fans at the circuit. Recently it’s very rare that that has come across on the TV (Rubens gaining pole at Brazil in 2009 being one of the notable exceptions), and I thought it was great. And hearing a lock-up on the feed and thinking, “who was that?” before the cameras pick up on it. Sure, it would be great to have the cake and eat it, to have the noise and the rest, but I like thinking about the strategy during the GP for myself and trying to guess what might happen.

    F1 evolves, it always has, and it always will. I remember howls of complaint when the V10s and V12s were lost and protests that the V8s sounded like little kittens, and now suddenly the V8s are the be all and end all. Please, change happens, embrace what has been added rather than mourning what’s been lost!

    Double points on the other hand, complete Bull.

    1. cartweel says:

      Howls of complaint! YES! It was a tragedy when we lost the last V12… but V10′s weren’t too bad and at 20K RPM- man there was some sweet music back then. It was a tragedy when we went to the 18K V8′s, but again it was “ok” but not as good. This regression has happened over a number of years- but it is a continual downward slide. I will continue to mourn what used to be and try to reconcile it with better racing- except that won’t happen this year as Merc is so far ahead of everyone that they will win every race. This season will be like the Shumi domination years, except without the magical sound of a lot of cylinders moving really fast. This surely has to be reason to mourn…

  133. John says:

    No refueling, the once tried grooved tires and now more limited fuel capacity/consumption has helped castrate the sport.

    I know everyone has opinions on the integrity or possible artificial nature of things like DRS, but I like DRS, KERS and the newer electric gizmos used to increase performance but this is not Formula E.

    Intensity and aesthetics matter. It’s not simply good enough to say we’ll grow to love the ugly cars or we’ll soon forget the old sound and all will be the same. It’s lost ‘something’ and I want it back. Change is fine, but don’t lose that ‘something’.

    I’m so glad its not just me that sees this or has a similar view, but having the pundits mock the cars for their looks and sound only highlights how bad it is, and makes the sport that much less enjoyable to watch, don’t you think?

  134. David Rd says:

    The fans are MUCH more annoyed by things like double points and DRS than the sound and fuel consumption, so why don’t they do something about those things as well, I mean at least a poll? hypocrites, only using the fans opinion when they benefit from it.

  135. John S says:

    Let’s forget about the decibels for a minute and first address the fact that v8 powered AMG and Ferrari’s road cars sound better than the current crop of F1 cars.

  136. Craig says:

    You don’t need any more proof of how far F1 has fallen in 4 months than to view this video.
    http://m.wimp.com/newengines/

    1. Rich C says:

      A perfect illustration.

  137. Neil Daniel says:

    I think I’m one of the few F1 fans who actually likes what the new rules seem to be achieving!

    The cars are lacking engine noise? So what! I saw the Audi TDI’s at Le Mans and was amazed at how much easier it was to tell exactly what the car was doing, how the driver was manipulating it mid-corner (tyre noise, brake noise) and the change as the tyres wore out.

    Fuel efficiency will improve with time, plus the ERS will get better so power outputs will go up. Did no-one notice how the cars are twitchy when all that electric torque kicks in?

    Aero regs that encourage free-thinking and innovation? Bring it on! At least you can tell the cars apart at a quick glance.

    The rest (fuel flow meters, teams being cautious etc) is just part of the teams/parts suppliers adapting to the huge reg changes. I will hold off my verdict on whether these changes have been good or bad until mid-season at the earliest.

    Double points however can be dropped with immediate effect!!

  138. Rishi says:

    Bloody hell I am staggered (though perhaps I shouldn’t be) at the extent of the negativity. Yes, drivers varied their pace to save fuel but they were also pushing hard in phases – on a fuel-thirsty track. It wasn’t like some races last season where everyone lapped really slowly the whole race to stop the tyres going off. And the teams have done such an incredible job to adapt to the new regulations and give us a fairly quick, pretty competitive opening round of the season.

    I can understand that the noise will feel underwhelming to grandstand viewers, and this is unfortunate. Mercedes might dominate, which may impact the wider spectacle. Double points are a farce. But I like the road-relevance of the hybrids; F1 technological ingenuity at its best. And the drivers are being challenged too; to try and handle the immense torque generated by the right boot. Those, I feel, should be things to be cautiously optimistic about.

  139. SteveS says:

    It’s very early days yet, I’m willing to give the new F1 half a season before passing judgement on it. Australia was disappointing, both for the lack of noise and the lack of racing. But perhaps the latter at least will improve as the season progresses.

  140. Gareth says:

    Personally I like it, it makes the drivers think and they are really on it. So we cant hear the engines as much, big deal! I watch it on my tv, I still hear it and the brakes. Issue with F1 is its being controlled by a man who to be honest is still living in the 90s. Times change get over it Bernie!

  141. Vlad says:

    I actually like the current sound better than the sounds of the V8… prefer to hear the lockups, screeching of tyres etc, like in 80s when real F1 existed. Not as many rules back then. The days when drivers displayed their real personalities and were not driven by corporate marketing. When the sport was more dangerous and engines more powerful.

    P.S. Can we still take the survey or is it closed?

  142. adupré says:

    This is such a farce! The new formula is far superior and more exciting- to boot. Everyone needs to stop allowing preconception to rule their headspace and actually pay attention to the style of driving which is going to be required of these pilots this year. Can we not ruin the sport w antiquated ideals and superficial values (like sound, which is great)? Wtf has this become? American Football? Monster Trucks? Conservation is a myth, Progress is inevitable.

  143. fox says:

    So the feedback is to get Domenicali out of the team.

    1. Rich C says:

      Well, yes, *someone has to take the fall and it sure ain’t gonna be ol’ 3-car Monte!

  144. Rafael Lopez says:

    For me this whole noise business is very simple. It’s unlikely to stop me from watching races on TV, but I’ve pretty much decided I’m not going to spend money on going to a GP with these lame engines.

    I mean come on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jS4Dh_EAfJI

    1. radohc says:

      lol, indeed it did sound as if they were cruising only and the perception is it was much slower.

  145. Richard says:

    Well when there are wholesale changes to the sporting regulations it’s like throwing the various elements up into the air, and see where they land. It is also a fact that what we are seeing now is not a true picture of how this formula will normalise. A better time might be mid year. That said and on the basis of just one race it appears there are pluses and minuses with the sound of the engines perhaps being a negative, but on the plus side the cars are very responsive. I have some sympathy with what Briatore is saying, and I don’t buy the reasons why formula one has to go this way as the motor industry know their own markets and are quite capable of developing hybrid technology without F1. Personally I would prefer bigger engines with lots of grunt, reduced aero dependancy, and increased mechanical grip with larger, wider tyres particularly at the rear. Really all this is is engineering following a trend that is unnecessary and perhaps undesirable.

  146. John says:

    that has to be the poorest effort for a survey i have ever seen. If they wanted to gain some useful information they should ask specific questions about the problems people are complaining about
    tyres, noise, fuel, look of cars, etc.. I personally think that the Melbourne race was very entertaining, I just wish the engines were louder and the lap times were quicker.

    1. Marcus says:

      I’ve been a huge fan of F1 ever since the very first race I experienced as a young boy in Adelaide, Australia but I’m sorry but the sound of the 2014 cars…..it’s just not the same and no longer grabs my interest. The loud scream of F1 cars flying up the straight is what set it apart from the other forms of race driving. This new sounding vehicle is just plain boring now. For me F1 was all about the noise.

  147. Shanna says:

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  148. Tom Hall says:

    Once again a Ferrari drive breaks the rules and gets away with it (Alonso vs Hamilton)
    If that had been the opposite way round Ferrari would have been screaming ‘FOUL’ but there was nothing done to make Alonso give back the advantage he gained by shortcutting when being challenged by Hamilton.

    Charlie Whiting, PLEASE RESPOND!

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