Posted on December 4, 2013
Port Imperial GP

The organisers of the New Jersey Grand Prix have vowed to fight to get their race onto the 2015 F1 calendar after the World Motor Sport council rubber stamped a 19 race calendar for next season which does not feature the second US race. It had originally been slated for a date in early June.

Leo Hindery Jr and his team have struggled to delivery the project due to the complexity of the location, the permissions required the financing of the project and the time scale. The race, with a backdrop of the New York skyline, is a personal ambition of F1 commercial boss Bernie Ecclestone, who commented, “There is great demand for a race in New Jersey and I have no doubt we’ll be racing at Port Imperial in 2015. New races can take many years to get started, but there is significant momentum and we are close to realizing a New York City F1 race.”

Chris Pook, the Long Beach GP promoter and special adviser to the New Jersey race, said, “This is a very complicated circuit and incredibly important to the overall Formula One program in North America,” he said. “To get it right in New York will greatly increase awareness of Formula One and motor racing across the continent. I remain very confident about this event.”

Official 2014 F1 calendar
16/03 Grand Prix of Australia
30/03 Grand Prix of Malaysia
06/04 Grand Prix of Bahrain
20/04 Grand Prix of China
11/05 Grand Prix of Spain
25/05 Grand Prix of Monaco
08/06 Grand Prix of Canada
22/06 Grand Prix of Austria
06/07 Grand Prix of Great Britain
20/7 Grand Prix of Germany
27/07 Grand Prix of Hungary
24/08 Grand Prix of Belgium
07/09 Grand Prix of Italy
21/09 Grand Prix of Singapore
05/10 Grand Prix of Japan
12/10 Grand Prix of Russia
02/11 Grand Prix of USA (Austin)
09/11 Grand Prix of Brazil
23/11 Grand Prix of Abu Dhabi

New Jersey vows to host 2015 Grand Prix as 19 race F1 calendar is signed off by FIA World Council
81 Responses

  1.   1. Posted By: John
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 6:38 pm 

    Lets just hope the title is decided before the last race of the season, as Abu Dhabi isn’t the best circuit for a good race!

    [Reply]

    J.Danek Reply:

    I was just browsing another UK based site full of F1 “fanatics” and was shocked by the vitriol directed against Abu Dhabi. And while thankfully nothing I read crossed into the realm of anti-middle eastern prejudice, I was surprised by the sheer glee people seemed to take in ragging on the Yas circuit.

    Is it really that bad? I actually think it’s a rather pretty ambience w/ the day-into-night thing they’ve got going there!

    [Reply]

    David Ryan Reply:

    The circuit is a very impressive facility, no question – it’s very polished and quite stylish if you’re into modern architecture. What it isn’t, however, is a great layout for single seater racing and it does lend itself to rather processional races (DRS zones excluded, it’s very difficult to overtake there). It’s not the worst Tilke circuit out there, but it’s by no means his best either. I think that’s probably the root of most complaints about it.

    [Reply]

    Haydn Reply:

    It may not have provided the best races over the years, but in terms of facilities for spectators, it is undoubtedly better than anywhere else I’ve ever been.

    The only downside is that the extremely low chance of rain leaves it seeming a bit predictable, which is why having the title showdown at Brazil has been so good in the past.

    [Reply]

    Anil Reply:

    The track isn’t designed for F1 racing and even with 2 HUGE DRS zones overtaking is very difficult. The chicane before the hairpin and the slow chicane at the end of the first straight just cause a huge field spread making overtaking difficult.

    It’s a shame that modern circuits don’t copy tracks like Brazil or Spa where overtaking is much more natural and doesn’t require gimmicks like DRS.

    [Reply]

    Matt Reply:

    I agree that it’s a pretty thing to look at, and I don’t deny that there may be a few passionate Abu Dhabi fans in there.

    But the atmosphere is dead compared to the more classic venues. Which is to be expected, because F1 hasn’t been in Abu Dhabi very long. So that’s fair enough.

    But it would help if it put on a great race. I don’t think it’s as bad as Valencia, but the races there have not been special if you remove the title battle elements and just look at the race. And regardless of how the circuit looks in day or night, or the interest of the fans, an exciting race should be possible.

    Unfortunately, several circuits are more deserving as a venue to decide a championship by virtue of the more exciting racing.

    And when there are several other circuits that produce better racing, and have a more passionate fanbase, some will be very unhappy with Bernie taking F1 to places like Yas Marina, and rightly so.

    [Reply]

    @Damien_Marquez (grandprixadvisor.com) Reply:

    The 2010 race left a lot to be desired after such an unbelievably close season. How can you have a track where the fast cars cannot overtake the slow ones without the help of DRS?

    It looks indeed like a stunning location, and one that I’d love to go and see in time for the grand prix, but the race there hasn’t been all that exciting for the TV viewing public compared to Suzuka or Interlagos for example.

    [Reply]

    Kevin Reply:

    Too wide, too smooth. Every line through the corner ends up at the same exit speed. It’s not unusual for new tracks. Everyone can run about the same speed everywhere, a mistake doesn’t cost you much time. The V8 Supercars are even boring to watch there and that’s saying quite a lot.

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    Every Vettel fan disagrees with you.

    Abu Dhabi worked out just fine last time it ended the season. In fact, it was the beginning of a beautiful thing, no?

    It’s OK to smile, it’s good for you everyone.

    [Reply]

    Anil Reply:

    There’s no proper racing at Abu Dhabi as the entire track is mickey mouse. Chicane-hairpin-straight is just ridiculous and you tell it wasn’t designed for grand prix racing. Compare that to brazil, a track where even races with no DRS see lots of overtaking, and you realise how sad it is that Brazil isn’t ending the season.

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    …But I do agree strongly that Interlagos is a magical place to end the season. I think Bernie agrees too, but after 3 Interlagos endings wants to give one to Abu Dhabi. Then back to Interlagos for 2015, 16, 17. Hope that’s the pattern. We can live it with.

    Just think of it this way. If Vettel wins the WDC at Abu Dhabi in 2014 we would have come a full circle and a new champion may be crowned in 2015.

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    live it with? Am I cixelsyd? I think I may be just a bit.

    [Reply]

    Robert Reply:

    I saw what you there did with it…

    tara Reply:

    my god i actually googled that *face palm*

    does anyone know what the official circuit will be?

    Tyemz Reply:

    Well, no need singling out Abu Dhabi for bashing. It is not the worst track on the calendar and Brazil 2013 was not the classic we ‘d hoped for either. As a matter of fact, Spa, Monza, Interlagos, Austin promised so much but delivered so little this year.
    If 2014 promises a tenth of the boredom of 2013, then all the races would be interchangeable in my opinion.

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    I enjoy the setting and the atmosphere in Abu Dhabi,and the day/night thing is great – the track layout isn’t optimum but they know that and are looking at a couple of modifications. But as a track facility
    it’s one of the best in the world

    [Reply]

    Daniel MA Reply:

    “But as a track facility it’s one of the best of the world”

    It may be James, but the only people who really care about that are the ones that work directly in F1.

    For us fans it makes no difference if you guys work in a dilapidated circuit or stay in love hotels, having great races and the atmosphere that only real fans with packed grandstands can give is what should matter most in the end.

    James Allen Reply:

    And the fans who attend the races. F1 is also about them, surely?

    Daniel MA Reply:

    Well you’re right, I guess fans should also have the option (if they have the money) to attend a higher quality event.
    But it’s just a shame that the racing isn’t up to those standards as well, sorry if I sound bitter hehe.

    Anil Reply:

    James, what track modifications are they looking at? If they could get rid of the chicane-hairpin combo before the first straight and slow chicane afterwards it might actually lead to a decent race.

    Rishi Reply:

    Excellent facilities, yes, and maybe not the most exciting race. However, as I’ve argued in my blog recently, I think the 2010 finale that was held there has had a huge impact – bigger than some more closer season finales – on what has happened in subsequent years. Put simply, I don’t think Sebastian Vettel in 2013 would have been as complete a driver as he is today if he hadn’t won the title – having started the race as third favourite – with victory at that race. I’m also not sure Red Bull would have had so much of a winning culture if they hadn’t got the double back then.

    Part of me will follow this up by arguing that Abu Dhabi isn’t therefore a bad finale, though I agree Brazil is better and nearly always provides compelling drama.

    Overall I like the calendar for this season. It seems a lot more spread out and calmer than the last two years; as an F1 fan, having the sprint finish of six races in eight weeks was exciting but it must have been exhausting for the teams. Minor quibbles with some of the detail in terms of convenience (Should Malaysia have been back-to-back with China or Australia rather than Bahrain? Why are Japan and Russia back-to-back?) but overall pretty decent stuff.

    [Reply]


  2.   2. Posted By: aezy_doc
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 6:49 pm 

    A few things to note -
    Ending the season in Abu Dhabi is a poor decision. The spectacle at Brazil is always more unpredictable due to the nature of the track and the weather. Abu Dhabi is sterile in comparison. I know which I would prefer for the final round.

    The random assignation of weeks between grands prix makes no sense. 2 weeks, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks. Is there a logistical reason for this I am unaware of?

    Dropping Korea and India saddens me. Whilst they were never classics, the amount of money spent to build the tracks etc seems a huge waste for the number of races held there. I am also saddened cos I was awesome (comparatively!)at India in F1 on the Xbox.

    No real conclusions, just observations and thoughts

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    Logistics would be part of it, but the timing of corporate and sponsor events would be another.

    And don’t worry, you can still be awesome on the Xbox :)

    [Reply]

    Andrew M Reply:

    If I had to drop two races from this year’s calendar I would have chosen Korea and India in a heartbeat. I’d trade either for the Vettel-ring, and Russia can’t really be any worse.

    [Reply]

    Sujith Reply:

    India? Really? Even after this year’s Grand Prix?

    [Reply]


  3.   3. Posted By: Sebee
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 6:54 pm 

    Honestly, at this point I’ll believe it when I see it.

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    The NJ race?

    Frankly I won’t believe it even when I see it ;)

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    When it happens it will be unbelievable. I plan to be there to see the miracle with my own eyes.

    [Reply]


  4.   4. Posted By: Richard
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 6:59 pm 

    Some good changes. Undoubtedly Abu Dhabi as season finale isn’t one of them. Still surprised to see Hungary on it, considering nobody likes that track. Quite happy with Austria.

    [Reply]

    Simmo Reply:

    Sadly Hungary is going nowhere :( It is just always on the calendar.

    [Reply]

    Andrew Halliday Reply:

    Hungary is an amazing track. There have been some classic races there over the past few years. What doesn’t necessarily show up on TV is the great atmosphere at the track – thousands of people camp in close proximity to the track and the atmosphere is always brilliant. The weather is nearly always sunny and the views of the circuit are great due to it being in a valley. I’m sure loads of people love Hungary.

    [Reply]

    @Damien_Marquez (grandprixadvisor.com) Reply:

    The F1 circus loves Budapest for the location. The spectators love the view (and the location too).

    I don’t know who are these people you refer to, but I don’t think it’s the majority.

    [Reply]

    @Damien_Marquez (grandprixadvisor.com) Reply:

    I also forget the important bit… They have a contract until 2021!

    [Reply]

    Sujith Reply:

    The Hungaroring is one of the best European circuits out there.

    I really can’t believe people not liking that venue!!

    [Reply]

    Richard Reply:

    It is Monaco, without all the prestige. Frankly, boring as hell. The only good race I have seen there was 2006.

    [Reply]


  5.   5. Posted By: Ronnie
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 7:14 pm 

    Living in New Jersey – I cannot wait!

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    Not living in New Jersey – I cannot wait!

    I want my kids to see the Statue of Liberty for the first time, the right way – with the right foreground and right soundtrack.

    Perhaps that is just how the French intended it – a sound of French engineering pushing a German to victory!

    [Reply]

    Ronnie Reply:

    hahaha. that’s a good one. you made me laugh!

    [Reply]

    Roddie Reply:

    Quite clever!

    [Reply]

    Gilles V Reply:

    Don`t forget the french engine

    [Reply]


  6.   6. Posted By: D Vega
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 7:25 pm 

    Another US race will be fantastic, but F1 will never truly prosper in the USA until there is at least one US driver regularly fighting for the top step of the podium. I live in TX and I can assure the readers of this forum that the local and national media coverage for the two Austin GPs has been virtually nonexistent. The Austin GP might have garnered more attention had it been held in the summer. During November the sporting hearts of Americans are captivated by the NFL, the start of the NBA season, and the start of the NHL season.

    [Reply]

    J.Danek Reply:

    Summer in Texas? NO thanks!!! People think it was hot in Hungary…

    You’re welcome to sit in a big asphalt heat-sink tho!

    [Reply]

    D vega Reply:

    Indycar holds a night race in Dallas, TX during the summer w/out any problems.

    [Reply]

    Phil Alloy Reply:

    Agreed. ESPN TV carried little or no word on USGP weekend even while giving copious space to the final NASCAR race the same weekend. Until America’s sports xenophobic population understands the true scope of F1′s global appeal the USGP will continue to be a second or third tier activity here in the colonies.

    [Reply]

    Gilles V Reply:

    ESPN lost tv rights. That might explain it…

    [Reply]


  7.   7. Posted By: Stephen Taylor
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 7:41 pm 

    Next years’ championship should be cancelled.

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    Because?

    [Reply]

    Stephen Taylor Reply:

    F1 spends too much money whilst families struggle to pay bills. The fact the FIA have created new regulations with ‘powertrains’ prove my point with teams having to spend money. F1 is not committed enough to cost cutting. The Championship should be suspended from running until solutions to save money are found. Ways also need to worked out to make tickets more accessible in terms of pricing for fans.

    [Reply]

    Sebee Reply:

    I think your cost saving/fair/equal possibly Marxist view is in conflict with the way F1 works.

    Bottom line, money will be spent. FYI – it’s just paper we made up. Don’t be so attached to it. Think of it like gas in the tank. It’s either going to get burned or go bad sitting there.

    I think the world would be a much better place if we just spend all the money on fun things like F1 instead of many crap things we could all name.

    So Stephen, to conclude, no one stops you from cancelling the 2014 championship. I cancelled watching news in my home for example. It was easy. And we’re all happier somehow not knowing how many people died in various ways over past 24 hours and how “our money” is being spend by the politicians.

    As for F1, I still feel it necessary to knock out 2hrs on the treadmill at the gym during a GP weekend. If I feel good that weekend, when the GP ends I immediately register myself as P23 – 4 laps completed.

    Justin Reply:

    becuase none of the money being invested in more efficient engines is going to make its way into road cars that will be more efficient and cost less to run………………

    Random 79 Reply:

    Nice sentiment, but neither running or cancelling F1 cannot solve the world’s problems no matter how much they like to think that going green will.

    F1 can however distract people from their problems, at least for a couple hours at a time :)

    Haydn Reply:

    It would be simple to make tickets more affordable, but the greedy fat cats at the top wouldn’t like to have the money taken out of their pockets. There is a lot of money in the sport, but it’s just with the wrong people.

    Roddie Reply:

    We live in the age of capitalism. You can pretty much do what you want with your money.

    Besides, what about the families of the people working in F1 teams? They need to pay bills too.

    aezy_doc Reply:

    This is the most spurious argument I have ever heard. By this reckoning every professional sporting occasion should be postponed until the world is a utopian paradise. If f1 was postponed, what would happen to all the thousands of families and individuals who depend upon f1 for their income? From those who work directly for the teams to those who work at the tracks during race weekends, who work for sponsors, who work for Pirelli, the tv companies and so on. Whilst I agree ticketing and access is expensive, the solution can’t be to postpone f1. That’s sheer madness.

    Richard Reply:

    How does cancelling the championship so 100s loose their jobs help anyone?

    Robert Reply:

    So as someone who was (in a former life) a full Partner at a very large advertising and marketing firm in NYC…let me explain the facts of life in F1:

    1) F1 hasn’t been about auto racing in a long time. If you want THAT, then go watch sports car racing, like the Porsche Cup series.

    2) F1 is tangentially about technology development, or at least was. The technology got so good, that it was too fast for the existing tracks and had failure modes that would be spectacular – as in spectacular deaths (think Senna and others). Still, F1 has pushed a whole lot of safety and engineering improvements into autos, and will continue to do so…but THAT is a cost-driver…and improvements are getting costlier and costlier.

    3) So…we come to the REAL reason F1 is expensive: if it isn’t about auto racing, it is about MARKETING. Ferrari is a force in F1 – because for decades F1 has been pretty much the entirety of Ferrari’s marketing budget. Red Bull got into F1 (and other extreme sports) as simply a marketing development. Mercedes, Renault, and the other auto makers use F1 primarily as a marketing tool.

    Marketing budgets aren’t set by what something COSTS. It is set, in most companies, yearly as a line item in the annual budget, computed as a percentage of revenues. So the fact of the matter is – right now being competitive in F1 means being able to spend what Red Bull, Ferrari, and Mercedes think their marketing line item should cost for F1. You could run 2 stroke lawn mowers, but as long as Red Bull thought there was an advantage in spending $50MM on having the BEST two-stroke lawnmower to get wins, they would spend $50MM on that lawnmower….for the marketing value of winning on TV. And even with a resource restriction rule in place, teams would find a way to get around it, such as having subsidiaries that bore the cost of the technology, and then re-sold it to the parent company at far below cost. Yes, this happens even today.

    Don’t rue the costs of F1. Rue the fact that people will spend an obscene amount of money on flavoured, fizzy, caffeinated water, or French cars with no space but big turbo chargers, or …hmmm, I find it difficult to find a dig a Merc frankly. But you get the idea. Consumerism drives marketing, and marketing drives F1 costs. Not technology, not choice of engines, not logistics…not really anyway.

    If you want a more enlightened opinion, read Pope Francis’s latest musings. I am an atheist, and a marketer, and yet I find them good for my heart. I would like to see a Celebrity Death Match of Pope Francis against Bernie…

    Con Versleigh Reply:

    If the championship was ‘cancelled’ thousands of F1 employees – engineers, technicians and support staff – would struggle to pay their bills.

    Ben Reply:

    [mod] How will cancelling the championship help families pay their bills? The majority of the money in F1 comes from the TV rights, this is in correlation to the viewing figures or hidden behind a pay wall which is justified by the fact people are willing to pay for it. The rest comes from sponsorship which is also related to viewing figures. So if the championship was cancelled this means the TV companies have more money to spend on other TV programs which still leaves families out of pocket to pay their bills…

    Ok some circuits get money from local governments to put on the race but this is normally a drop in the ocean compared to their yearly budget. 20 million sounds like a lot but in the grand scheme of things is normally peanuts.

    You are right the teams are spending a lot of money on the new powertrains but as has been commented above it is technology that is being developed that is directly applicable to road cars and should eventually filter down making cars much more efficient to run which will help families pay their bills! There is a lot of money wasted on things that are not at all applicable to the ‘real world’ but if you compare it to other professional sports there is a lot that can help the common man save money!

    Random 79 Reply:

    And I thought I got some rough responses at times :)

    I think some might have missed your basic argument. Maybe I’m one of them, but what I got from your comment was:

    The FIA needs to limit the amount teams spend and they should be trying to make tickets more affordable.


  8.   8. Posted By: CJD
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 8:15 pm 

    F1 Ticket Grandstand A/B Low Weekend -> Check.
    Champing Ticket for one Car and Tent for the Weekend -> Check!

    I’m COMING Spielberg!!

    greetings
    CJD

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    TMI man.

    [Reply]


  9.   9. Posted By: AMSG
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 9:02 pm 

    So why did Mexico fall off ?? Thought they were just upgrading a circuit. Or has Carlos lost his interest in F1 ?

    [Reply]

    Simmo Reply:

    I believe that the upgrades weren’t going to be ready sadly.

    Not entirely sure though.

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    “So why did Mexico fall off??”

    When I first read that I honestly thought it was going to be the start of a bad joke :)

    I think they were (and maybe still are) upgrading the circuit but then decided it would take too long or cost too much.

    As for Carlos, I have the impression that’s his interest has diminished a bit since Perez failed to live up to expectations, but don’t quote me on it :)

    [Reply]

    AMSG Reply:

    Fall off the calendar, nothing else.

    [Reply]

    Anil Reply:

    I’m guessing it’s because it will take a long time for the upgrades to happen. Hopefully we’ll see it soon.

    [Reply]

    Roddie Reply:

    German Tilke has to design a pit complex and do some minor changes to the layout of the track. Basically Mexico is out due to shortage of time. They won’t make it to next November.

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    …and that’s why Roddie wins the best and most informative reply award :)

    [Reply]


  10.   10. Posted By: David Ryan
        Date: December 4th, 2013 @ 10:57 pm 

    I must admit my attitude towards the New Jersey circuit as a whole is one of “I’ll believe it when I see it”. Postponing once because of financing issues is fair enough, but postponing twice (and quite late in the day this time around – they’d already paid the 2014 entrance fees) suggests there may be something more fundamental amiss. The Circuit of the Americas has been built and run 2 Grands Prix in a comparable timescale, and with limited public funding. I hope I’m wrong for the sake of all involved, but despite the optimism expressed I’m not convinced this will go ahead.

    [Reply]


  11.   11. Posted By: Fan
        Date: December 5th, 2013 @ 12:04 am 

    This is an old photo – the WTC is still standing! How long have they been working on this?

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    Somewhere roughly in the neighborhood of too long.

    [Reply]


  12.   12. Posted By: Duncan Conway
        Date: December 5th, 2013 @ 12:16 am 

    Mexico dropping off the calendar, Mclaren dropping Perez and delaying their new title sponsor announcement… All to much of a coincidence.

    It would be nice if the New Jersey race takes place, but does anyone else think if Silverstone had given Bernie so much grief that Bernie would still be allowing them on the calendar… No chance! It will be interesting to see what happens when Bernie does go, pushed or not.

    [Reply]


  13.   13. Posted By: Duncan Conway
        Date: December 5th, 2013 @ 12:18 am 

    James, Gutierrez was reported seen at a British based f1 team today, would you happen to know anything?

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    Do you know which one? I can have a dig around

    [Reply]

    Duncan Conway Reply:

    From what I’ve seen this morning its Caterham.

    [Reply]

    DC Corey Reply:

    James:

    Autosport is reporting that it was Caterham.

    On a related note, Kovalainen’s name is being thrown around for a drive there, but hasn’t his ship sailed? It seems like he’s shown himself to be a perfectly average driver. I fail to understand why he’s still given consideration.

    Your thoughts?

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    He didn’t look great in the final two races in the Lotus -always risk to jump into an unfamiliar car late in a season. Justin Wilson did it with Jaguar if you remember.

    Yes I heard Caterham. Makes sense. Whether he’ll end up with a drive there is another matter.

    I think they like van der Garde and he had some good races especially second half of the season after the tyre switch. He’s also very good at talking to sponsors and that side of the game.

    He has budget from Macgregor.


  14.   14. Posted By: Johnston
        Date: December 5th, 2013 @ 7:32 am 

    James, the races that got cancelled, are they cancelled forever?

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    No, I think we might see Mexico, although it depends a bit on what happens with Perez and Gutierrez.

    New Jersey, I’m not so sure, it looks like a massive task

    [Reply]


  15.   15. Posted By: matt m
        Date: December 5th, 2013 @ 1:48 pm 

    My goodness is that the twin towers in the background, they have been taking a long time to get a race staged.

    [Reply]


  16.   16. Posted By: Richard
        Date: December 6th, 2013 @ 9:49 am 

    Happy to see Melbourne, Montreal, Spa, Monza, and Interlagos remain on the calendar. Five races which should never be taken off.

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply





COUNTDOWN TO NEXT RACE
Strategy Report
Innovation and Technology brought to you by TATA Communications
Senna DVD
Download the Chequered Flag Podcast here
MTS
Darren Heath
Sport Right Now