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Posted on December 15, 2013

Continuing our series of analysis of the head-to-head records of team mate pairings, here’s the analysis of Jules Bianchi and Max Chilton’s seasons at Marussia.

The Anglo-Russian team fielded an all-new line up in 2013, dispatching with Timo Glock and Charles Pic and bringing in rookies Chilton and Bianchi.

The team’s goal was to beat rivals Caterham and finish 10th in the constructors’ championship, after agonisingly losing the position at the final race of last season, and they achieved it this year courtesy of Bianchi’s 13th place in Malaysia.

Bianchi was impressive all season and looked to have the measure of team mate Chilton in both qualifying and race trim. As a result, Bianchi has been retained for next season.

The second seat is still up for grabs, however the team have been very positive about Chilton’s performance both on track and in the garage. The Briton also became the first driver to finish every race in his rookie season.

In terms of qualifying, Bianchi finished faster in 17 of the 19 grand prix weekends. On the two occasions he was beaten by Chilton, he was affected by an engine failure (Monaco) and lost track time after a crash in practice (Japan).

Bianchi also achieved the team’s best grid slot of the season with 15th at the Belgian Grand Prix, one place ahead of Chilton as both cars made it into Q2 in tricky conditions.

In the races, neither driver scored points but Bianchi secured the team’s best finish of 13th at Sepang, while Chilton managed his best drive in Monaco with 14th. When both cars finished, Bianchi finished ahead in 14 races, with Chilton coming out on top in two.

Bianchi had three retirements during the season, while Chilton had none. Come the end of the season, Bianchi was ranked 19th in the championship, with Chilton 22nd.

When splitting the season in two, Bianchi retained his advantage in both segments, heading the head-to-head in qualifying 9-1 in the first part of the season and 8-1 in the second part.

Check out the statistics below to see how Bianchi comfortably beat Chilton this season.

Bianchi v Chilton stats compared (highest respective tally in bold)

THIS SEASON

Qualifying


Faster qualifying time: Bianchi 17 / Chilton 2

Poles: Bianchi 0 / Chilton 0

Front rows: Bianchi: 0 / Chilton 0
Best qualifying finish: Bianchi 15th (Belgium) / Chilton 16th (Belgium)

Races


Wins: Bianchi 0 / Chilton 0

Poles: Bianchi 0 / Chilton 0

Points finishes: Bianchi 0 / Chilton 0 

DNFs: Bianchi 3 / Chilton 0 

Ahead in two-car finish: Bianchi 14 / Chilton 2
Highest finish: Bianchi 13th (Malaysia) / Chilton 14th (Monaco)

Championship


Points: Bianchi 0 / Chilton 0
Championship placing: Bianchi 19th / Chilton 23rd

BREAKDOWN OF SEASON

First 10 races

Out-qualified team-mate: Bianchi 9 Chilton 1
Wins: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Podiums: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Points: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Retirements: Bianchi 2 Chilton 0

Final nine races

Outqualified team-mate: Bianchi 8 Chilton 1
Wins: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Podiums: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Points: Bianchi 0 Chilton 0
Retirements: Bianchi 1 Chilton 0


  1.   1. Posted By: ALEX ARMANI
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 2:59 am 

    I say give Bianci choice of his teammate next year he will say max guaranteed cos they have one year working together already and they get on very well vote Vote Max Chilton, or Di Resta????

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    With respect to Marussia, is Di Resta that desperate for a seat?

    [Reply]

    Tim Reply:

    yes ;-)

    [Reply]

    @Damien_Marquez (grandprixadvisor.com) Reply:

    With respect to Di Resta, is Marussia that desperate for a driver?

    [Reply]

    Gavin Campbell Reply:

    Well they ired Max Chilton on not much GP2 promise and he duly delivered… the Aon money to run the team.

    Far and away the worst driver on the grid, Marussia would love to be able to afford someone of Paul’s talent. Remember prior to F1 Di Resta had won the DTM and beaten Sebastian Vettel to the F3 title in the same team. NB I think Seb is now a superior driver to Di Resta but he’s no slouch.

    Now remind me of Chilton’s junior pedigree? Ah yes 2 GP2 victories, 0 junior championships.

    @Damien_Marquez (grandprixadvisor.com) Reply:

    From a different angle, you do notice that they are not a good fit for one another. Marussia needs money that Di Resta won’t have and Di Resta wants to competitive seat e.g. non-Caterham or non-Marussia.

    Besides, Marussia have Bianchi, and he seems to be a pretty good yardstick.

    [Reply]


  2.   2. Posted By: Elie
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 3:31 am 

    Not much to say here other than thanks for the stats and Bianci should be in a top te sooner rather than later

    [Reply]

    Clarks4WheelDrift Reply:

    The jury is still out on Bianchi for me. He’s done well in the past, he is no doubt miles faster then the pay-drive pilots around him in Marussia and Caterham, but it’s hard to compare him to anyone half decent when his car is so far off the pace.

    Though I guess this is the case for many, like Daniel Ric. Is he outqualifying his car and dropping back in the race or should he be performing better on Sundays?

    [Reply]

    Elie Reply:

    For me it’s how quick a youngster is in his first trials. Jules was very quick in that Force India he tested compared to other drivers. As a Rookie in a slow team it’s very easy to crash and burn but I think he’s done enough to show he has real potential. More importantly the fact he changed teams and it didn’t seem to effect him is a real good sign. You also have to take into account they will get spoiled in big teams and be driven to the limits by top level team mates. I believe Bianci will be in Ferrari by this time next year as a reserve or maybe even as a no2 if Fernando walks.
    Same deal with Magnussen his test times were ballistic and his results in the lower categories speak volumes

    All you can do is make a judgement call on wether the driver is mature enough to handle it. & Certainly from I see and read both these guys are. The critical thing is bein fast.Raikkonen was epic at a young age and no driver before and even indeed after him drive with that speed and maturity.

    [Reply]

    Clarks4WheelDrift Reply:

    epic at a young age … and Mosely, amongst others, were crazy enough to think Kimi might not deserve his super-licence!!!!


  3.   3. Posted By: Mark V
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 5:39 am 

    My Dad says I am better than Chilton. He has a lot of money so we will soon see.

    [Reply]

    Dave C Reply:

    Well I know I am better than Chilton, love to race him on a simulator just to prove it but then not everyone gets the opportunity in life and Max did but lack of talent will always shine through in F1.

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    You mean your Dad has a lot of money, or is it Chilton that you’re referring to?

    If the former, looking forward to seeing you in F1 soon :)

    [Reply]

    Mark V Reply:

    My Daddy says I get a seat in F1 for my birthday. See you at the races.

    [Reply]

    Random 79 Reply:

    Cool.

    Just remember to make broom broom noises as you drive – they make you go faster ;)


  4.   4. Posted By: Rayz
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 8:04 am 

    If Chilton gets retained my faith in F1 will have taken a massive hit. Utterly useless all season. No point finishing every race if you are last all the time, that is not an achievement in my book. Surely raw pace is a major factor for rookie drivers. All the best drivers had that as young drivers and then developed the consistency over time to become a champion. The problem for Max is that you can’t learn speed. You either have it or you don’t…….. and he doesn’t.

    Well done Jules Bianchi on an excellent 2013 season. Most impressive.

    [Reply]

    Simmo Reply:

    +1.

    And it really annoys me when DC, Martin Brundle, or Ben Edwards go on about this fact every time his car is seen on screen.

    [Reply]

    AuraF1 Reply:

    I think Martin brundle is saying it ironically. He doesn’t seem to pass up the opportunity to joke about it.

    [Reply]

    Rayz Reply:

    I love Brundle, best commentator out there but I think he is genuinely impressed. Not one word of criticism all year from team Sky about Max.

    AuraF1 Reply:

    Brundle on Max Chilton, ‘I don’t think anybody is kidding themselves that he’d be in the car without that cheque behind him. Being beaten that comprehensively by your teammate means we should be asking questions.’ He’s also joked a few times about Max winning the finish every GP award and at least out qualifying Jules when Jules has a failure. I admit Simon Lazenby has done the chest thumping ‘aren’t all the Brits just great?’ Style of presenting that he thinks the UK audience want to hear but Herbert has damned him with faint praise all year.

    I guess Max is a very nice man and has that sort of personable nature which makes it hard to attack him but I think the Sky and BBC presenting teams have tried to point out his flaws without being seriously offensive.


  5.   5. Posted By: Rjd1802
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 11:10 am 

    Chilton is an embarrassment and sums up what is wrong with the sport. Another thing to look at is how far behind Bianchi he was at the end of each race…..in the same car! Not to mention how he was often a second off the pace in qually. Even Susie Woolf is probably faster! I feel so strongly that he doesn’t deserve to be on the grid.

    [Reply]

    felangeo Reply:

    Even Susie Wolff? Sums up what’s wrong with the sport I guess.

    [Reply]

    AuraF1 Reply:

    No Susie is Definitely Faster – her test times indicate that. As do many racers without sponsorship. I have to assume Max has some level of talent – he’d probably out drive any one of us internet commentators – but F1 should be an elite category and I think he may have slipped in on his fathers cheque book as opposed to anything else.

    [Reply]

    Posimosh Reply:

    Suzie Wolfe has boo-coo sponsorship dollars. Even if she didn’t, it would be her own fault. Think about it, how many large companies would love to have a somewhat attractive, personable, and well spoken woman on the grid (in the newspaper, and on tv) to hawk their products for them. The non-race publicity would be worth millions and the fact that she would be the first woman driver in f1 in decades would ensure that every broadcast would at least show her/mention her sponsors in the nearly every segment of the pre and post race coverage.
    Therefore, there is a reason why Suzie Stoddard/Wolfe, Danica, and Simona di Silvestre haven’t been in a F1 car since James Hunt [mod]

    . I’m going to venture a guess and say that it’s because they would make their sponsors/themselves look bad. I can’t see any other conceivable reason why a team and it’s sponsors would choose to pass up the priceless free publicity except that they would have a larger downside than up in the eyes of the public.
    Plus, I would imagine it wouldn’t be that attractive of an opportunity for a female drive to tool around the back of an f1 grid, in a car that is difficult to drive while everyone talks s%#@ about them behind their back. I mean why do that when you could take home the same about of bread (or more because you don’t have to use all of your sponsorship money to buy a crap seat in a gp2… Errr… F1 car), racing in a series where you work and travel less, don’t have stalkers, and don’t have to do as many press events and racing weekends?
    Lastly, Danica/Suzie/Simmons/legge/fisher/et. Al may have been somewhat competative in British formula ford where their compact stature would benefit them substantially, but when the power rises and equalizes the weight disparity a bit, they have been nowhere or mid pack at best (possible exception di Silvestre).
    Don’t get me wrong, I totally think it would be good for the sport for a competative woman to rise throught the ranks to f1. I fear however that if we do see a woman in f1 any time in the near future, it’ll be because she looks like a swimsuit model and speaks like a lawyer, not because of her tyre management prowess on full tanks, or her blistering fast in and out laps around pit stops.

    [Reply]


  6.   6. Posted By: David
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 11:28 am 

    This is a difficult one. The stats and performance differences are clear. We also know the car is relatively poor, and Max probably wouldn’t be where he is in F1 today based on talent alone. But I think the jury has to be out until either or both race directly against a known quality driver in the same machinery.

    On one hand, Jules could be wringing the neck out of the car, which would make Max’s performances still very decent (a la Vettel and Webber) or Jules could be doing a decent job with Max not really up to scratch. I don’t have enough information to make an informed call on this so am open minded re Max. And so I feel a little sorry for him for the lack of respect people seem to have for him. I’m sure he’d destroy any of us in a race!

    James, is there a view on this in the paddock?

    [Reply]

    David Reply:

    And just to add, I do find the Marussia vs Cateram sub-plot, plus their battles with the back end of the mid teams, interesting during races and sometimes wish this got a little more focus during TV coverage. Sometime a race can be pretty static except for the plucky young teams fighting each other.

    I have a lot of time for them. It is no mean feat to establish a new F1 team and even be vaguely competitive. Their cars are still pretty damn quick, just a small few percent off the best. And remember they were roundly shafted by a promise of cost capping which never happened. Originally I was rooting for Caterham but their move to two pay drivers while Marussia ended up taking a punt on Jules now makes me cheer Marussia on. Understandable business led decision by Caterham, while Razia’s money not turning up was the driver behind Jules’s hiring. None the less, it makes Caterham feel just a little soulless to me now compared to Marussia. It’s also a little disappointing Caterham haven’t moved on more compared to Marussia when you consider the latter’s Cosworth engine, no kers until this year.

    But my point is that the championship would be poorer without these teams. I find their sub-plot more interesting at times than the Torro Rossos of this world.

    [Reply]

    OffCourse Reply:

    +1

    [Reply]

    Daniel Spiller Reply:

    Agreed. With the performance that Marussia had this last season in their car, I can’t help thinking well see them move up the grid with the new reg changes. All due respect to caterham and the engineering “talent” they have, but they did have the engine which won the constructors and drivers championships. Ergo their aero team are terrible. All the while Marussia had the very worst engine on the grid and pushed then very close or beat them on more than a few occasions and beat them overall.
    I’d love to see Marussia really getting close next year, they’ve got a good team and some solid facilities and I absolutely believe it’ll be them and not caterham who move up the grid with the reg changes.

    [Reply]

    Adrian Newey Jnr Reply:

    Well said.

    [Reply]

    Elie Reply:

    David- too right !-how many of us were hoping the cameras moved to the back whilst Red Bull were disappearing away at the front. At the start of year it was ok cause Lotus, Ferrari and Mercedes were all in the mix.. But after summer break the dice for 10th was more exciting than that for 1.

    The only thing I can suggest is that Pat Symmonds bought a lot of experience and help set the processes to be more competitive at Marussia – lets hope they keep growing and strengthening with a Ferrari powertrain- this will be particularly inspiring for young Jules because he will come under even greater watch from Ferrari and could be the year that decides his future.

    The feeling I get from Caterham is that they aimed too high too soon under Tony Fernandes and they had to rationalise and build for the future under Cyril that adjustment took them too far back and their investments in premises pushed them to take 2 pay drivers. I think Pic is still a good prospect but who knows what they will do next. I think they are wrong to consider Heikki but let’s see what surprises they announce.

    [Reply]

    Ian Reply:

    I agree with you 100% – thank you for expressing my sentiments so eloquently.

    [Reply]

    AuraF1 Reply:

    I agree it’s hard to know. Max might be genuinely awful or he might be quite a talented driver and it’s just Bianchi is an absolute mega star in waiting. It’ll be interesting to
    See if Jules impresses at the Ferrari tests.

    [Reply]

    Kimi4WDC Reply:

    The amount of money he brings in there is no way Bianchi is getting better treatment or Max somehow disadvantaged. There more than enough information to see why Max should not be on the grid next year, 19 races worth of information.

    [Reply]

    James Reply:

    I have no doubt Chilton would beat posters on her in a race, but I also have no doubt that the overwhelming majority of posters on here don’t have 10+ years of racing experience behind them, and equally they wouldn’t try to make a serious claim to being deserving of an F1 seat.

    [Reply]


  7.   7. Posted By: JL
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 5:41 pm 

    Though Chilton’s record seems rather impressive for a rookie, he did finish last 13 times this year. To me that is perhaps the most revealing stat.

    I like Marussia a lot and I wish they would give a young talented driver a shot. There a plenty in GP2.

    [Reply]

    iceman Reply:

    I’m amazed he managed to finish not-last 6 times! I guess it helped that Marussia had a stronger car than Caterham early in the season.

    [Reply]


  8.   8. Posted By: luqa
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 5:45 pm 

    Up the grid these two drivers could be SV and MW, almost a whitewash and sheer domination. At least MW had the good grace to ‘find a new challenge”, something MC should do as well. Congrats to JB!

    [Reply]


  9.   9. Posted By: alexdhq
        Date: December 15th, 2013 @ 9:25 pm 

    Does anyone remember the team-mates of Webber or Alonso at Minardi? I don’t… Max who???

    [Reply]


  10.   10. Posted By: Adrian Newey Jnr
        Date: December 16th, 2013 @ 2:01 am 

    James – given the movements in the middle tier teams, other than money, is there any reason Bianchi didn’t get a look in?

    [Reply]

    Martin Reply:

    Hazarding a wild guess – Ferrari engines.

    [Reply]


  11.   11. Posted By: titanracer69
        Date: December 16th, 2013 @ 2:26 am 

    I do not see Max as anymore than a number 2 on a lower tier team. but I could be wrong! I know the 2013 stats are against him. however, I would have thought he would not be so reasonably close to his highly-rated team mate! in general over the years, a number 2 driver on a top-tier team is roughly about .4 sec slower than his number 1 team mate. Max was not too far off that standard during the last half of the year. if he were in one of the top tier teams, I would can his butt. being with Marussia, I would give him a holy be-Jesus talk and one more year…

    [Reply]


  12.   12. Posted By: JB
        Date: December 16th, 2013 @ 2:36 am 

    Lets compare all the crappy drivers like narain karthikeyan, Alex Yoong, Takuma Sato, Scott Speed, and others…
    I think Chilton has done a bit better finishing all races while driving a low budget team race car.
    I guess he must drive like me… Throttle at 40-60% and brake extra early. LOL! He is not the worst but still F1 should be better than this…

    [Reply]

    Kimi4WDC Reply:

    I think it’s an insult to put Sato with the other names you mentioned.

    It’s a not an achievement any self respecting driver would be proud of, but than again, the reason why he is in F1 shows how much his pride cost exactly.

    No need to sugar coat things. We have Team Principals doing that plenty. Max is just not good enough – compare to hundreds others, who dont even get a chance because of people like Max and Gutierrez.

    [Reply]


  13.   13. Posted By: Al
        Date: December 17th, 2013 @ 2:36 pm 

    What you do not point out is that Chilton was very close to his teammate and kept out of trouble so called better drivers did not. Sutil and Maldo are both clearly inferior choices from this aspect.

    Rookies also get faster, as Alonso realised in 2007…

    [Reply]


  14.   14. Posted By: Tim Draper
        Date: December 17th, 2013 @ 10:01 pm 

    Maybe it’s time for either Marussia or Caterham to take a punt on Alice Powell? Sponsorship would surely follow soon after!

    [Reply]

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