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Maldonado escapes with small fine and reprimand after Perez collision
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Darren Heath
Posted By: James Allen  |  08 Jul 2012   |  6:17 pm GMT  |  267 comments

Pastor Maldonado was handed only a €10,000 euro fine by race stewards at Silverstone, despite calls from Sergio Perez, the driver he took out of the race, for them to take strong action against the Venezuelan.

Maldonado and Perez collided on lap 11 as Perez tried to pass the Williams around the outside at Brooklands corner. Maldonado appeared to drive outwards, towards the Sauber and they touched, spinning both off the race track and Perez into retirement.

This followed the incident in Valencia where Maldonado took Lewis Hamilton out in the closing stages of the race, for which he was given a 20 second penalty added to his race time.

The stewards’s statement at Silverstone acknowledged the “serious nature of the incident” but gave him only the fine and a reprimand. The penalty fell well short of the grid penalty for the next race which many in F1 felt was the minimum Maldonado should receive, given his recent track record.

Perez was furious with the Venezuelan after this latest incident, calling him “stupid” in media interviews and claiming that many drivers feel he should not be in F1 with all the incidents in which he has “ruined other people’s races.”

“Pastor, he’s a driver who doesn’t respect other drivers,” Perez said. “It’s just a manner of fact. I was already in front and he should have given enough space not to crash. I don’t understand the way he is driving.

“I hope the stewards do something because he has done something to someone at the last three races,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live. “He’s a very dangerous driver and he can hurt someone. Everybody is concerned about him. He’s a driver who doesn’t respect, doesn’t know we are risking our lives and has no respect at all. I really think the stewards need to do something by now because I’m not the only one he has affected.”

Maldonado said, “It was an unlucky race for me and that is it. Sergio can say what he wants. We are racing, we are trying to do our best. I was trying to defend, he was trying to gain and this is racing.”

Meanwhile the stewards fined Kamui Kobayashi €25,000 for driving into his own pit crew, because it was ” a very dangerous manoeuvre which had potentially serious implications.”

What do you think? Are these the right penalties for the incidents and are they consistent?

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267 Comments
  1. Dave says:

    MAL was already lucky to escape any meaningful penalty for his clash with HAM in Valencia. He should consider himself fortunate that he’ll be allowed to start the next couple of races, never mind not losing any grid positions.

    1. Hare says:

      F1.com is reporting the fines the other way around. 25k for MAL, 10k for KOB.

      http://www.formula1.com/news/headlines/2012/7/13566.html

      1. HFEVO2 says:

        The fines that way round would be more appropriate…………

      2. Will says:

        How does Maldonado even deserve a penalty when Rosberg got away without penalty at Bahrain.
        Rosberg’s move was deliberate – Alonso had the sense to run wide.

        Maldonado’s move was not deliberate and moreover Sergio had plenty of room on the outside. He just had bad luck and a bit of a tantrum. If Sergio happened to be a foot or so further out – there would have been no contact.

        Having said that, Maldonado would score many more points if he was more patient.

    2. alexbookoo says:

      Some of Maldonado’s other incidents have been very bad and he should have been punished more severely for them, but seriously in this one he just lost the car a bit and drifted into Perez. It was innocuous and I’m glad the stewards didn’t over-react.

      1. Carl Sheen says:

        What ever happened to drivers having suspended race bans?

        If he has a history of incidents give him a suspended ban and then anything else and he pays the price.

      2. alexbookoo says:

        Good idea.

    3. Wayne says:

      Agreed Dave, what really worries me is that on more than one occasion it has looked like Maldonaldo has deliberately turned into other drivers. Now, only he really knows the truth, so we cannot claim this as a fact but…. The guy is in the team because of the sponsorship money he brings. Period. This is the danger of bringing in drivers for cash. F1 can never truly claim to be the world’s premiere motorsport formula while drivers can buy their way in, and real tallents go overlooked. The sport should marry the best drivers with the best machinery.

      As for the stewards, they are consistently inconsistent. Year in, year out they do an abysmal job with some of their decisions downright wacky and bizarre.

      1. gudien says:

        Maldonado is a race winner for Williams. How many races have Barrichello and Rosberg won for Williams?

      2. Spinodontosaurus says:

        How many Williams cars did Rosberg and Barichello drive that were actually good cars?

      3. Carlos Hernandez says:

        Senna Crashed on purpose with Prost at Suzuka ’91… there was no penalty… and Ayrton is one of the Greatest Drivers ever in Formula 1… let the guys Race and Crash… it’s part of the sport… and if you don’t like it go to karts… or Indycar…

      4. Aseem Javed says:

        Couldn’t disagree more. This guy purely has the speed and talent to be in F1 based on merit. He just has some rough edges that need to be ironed out. The fact that he collided with Hamilton in last race has seen him to be on the recieving end of critisicm. Some of which is unwarranted. As in both the accidents the fault was not entirely of his own making.

        To say that he drove into Perez in Valencia as suggested is not true. He lost the rear while turning and went wide onto Perez who was clearly driving as if there is no tomorrow and he had to pull that move on the outside (which was very ambititous to begin with) and hope that Maldonado gives him space. Maldanado clearly had the inside line. Had his rear not stepped out and there be so much media hype, and had he just collided because he had inside racing line, there should have been no fine. I am glad stewards saw this as a minor incident that warranted minor penalty and didnt blow it out of proportions like Perez demanded.

        In regards to Lewis accident, its clear that Lewis gave him no room like he had given to Kimi and Grojsean earlier. Lewis had no tires and it was short sighted on his part to put everything on the line for both drivers.

        More than anything I hope Maldanado doesn’t let the critisicm from drivers who themselves have had there share of collisions get into him. I dont see any Grojsean bashing, as he too is a collision magnet, but I see a lot of Maldo bashing!

      5. Wayne says:

        Wow, blinkers of what? It’s not just Hamilton in the last race he has collided with is it? Did you watch Spa last year at all? He does it all over the place, in practice, in Qualy, in the race and it appears he does it deliberately.

        Are you seriously going to suggest that he’d be in F1 without the sponsorship money? Seriously?

      6. He has the speed, for sure; however, he can’t make decisions under pressure.

        Monaco, last year, he turned in early on Hamilton who was pulling off the same move he successfully pulled off on Schumacher earlier in the race – he didn’t think and turned in on Hamilton. Australia this year, he pushed too hard at the end of the race on worn tires, and made a mistake, losing control and hitting the wall. Valencia this year, he tried diving up the inside of Hamilton where there was obviously no room. Silverstone, he knew he was on cold tires, but when trying to defend from Perez, pushes too hard and loses control.

        Yes, some of those moves are mistakes, but as an F1 driver he should know better and know the limits of the car and whether the gap is actually wide enough to fit a car without cracking a few A-arms to make room for it.

        At Catalunya, however, he was never really under pressure, and didn’t have to make any split-second decisions. There was always at least a bit of a gap that kept Alonso out of striking distance, so he just had to hold his line and not push it, and he could cruise to the flag.

        It’s not that he’s pulling shady moves like Schumacher’s defenses over the years (taking the “one move” rule to the limit, and according to some, beyond the limit) – he’s just making bad decisions at critical moments.

        When faced with decisions such as “should I make this pass here?” or “should I try carrying 5 mph more into this corner?”, he always chooses “OH YEAH!” as the answer and usually ends his race because of it. It’s not a case of Senna going for the gap and not being a racing driver if you don’t go for it; it’s a case of trying something that clearly won’t work and crashing because of it. Senna’s moves would usually work out, and sometimes would – Maldonado’s moves rarely, if ever, worked out well.

        Drivers with race-craft know that sometimes you can’t make the pass, and you should wait… Maldonado doesn’t have race-craft; he just has pace, and as a result he’ll get in a lot more accidents until he either figures it out, gets dropped by Williams or gets banned by the FIA.

      7. Aseem Javed says:

        “Yes, some of those moves are mistakes, but as an F1 driver he should know better and know the limits of the car ….”

        Trust me if I was to right down the mistakes/error in judgements that Schumi (upon his return) and Hamilton have made in the last 2 years it would look like both Schumi and Hamilton dont know how to drive within the limits of their cars.

        I think this year probably Grojsean/Maldanado have made the same number of mistakes/errors but the folks are out for Maldanado’s head as he collided into the crash kid of F1 in Valencia. Hamilton fans as you would expect blame the other guy in any incident involving Hamilton.

        I am not defending all of Maldanado’s mistakes but its almost like if he has the inside line, he is to blame. If he has the outside line, he is to blame. If he gets hit from Hamilton from behind, he is to blame. If he gets squeezed by Hamilton off the track, he is to blame. If Perez tries an aggressive/opportunistic/high risk move on the outside that has high chances of collision and they collide, Maldanado is to be blame.

      8. Spinodontosaurus says:

        The folks are out for Maldonado’s head because he has deliberately hit another car on at least 2 occasions in under 2 seasons.

      9. alexbookoo says:

        Yeah he brings money with him (just like Alonso), but would anyone deny that he’s faster than Senna?

      10. Wayne says:

        That is NOTHING to be proud of at all is it?

      11. Wayne says:

        Compareing this guy to Alonso is ridiculous in the extreme. Alosno would be at Ferrari without the bank. No-one in their right mind would say the same for PM!

      12. KGBVD says:

        Wanye, Alonso never would have been in F1 without sponsorship from Telefonica (bankrolled at Minardi), Vettel would never have been in F1 without Red Bull (bankrolled at BMW), Schumi without Mercedes (bankrolled at Jordan), shall I go on?

        The comparison with Alonso is more than apt. From F3000 to F1 (although Pastor won his championship, Alonso finished 4th) one season at the back, first win in second full season, etc.

        Maldonado has a nasty temper, and incidents like Monaco 2012 and Spa 2011 should be reprimanded with race bans, but he’s also just as entitled to make racing errors as an other sophomore driver.

        Lewis is in his 6th year and he still makes them.

      13. Wayne says:

        KGBVD, that’s a nice post, thank you for the reply.

        Can’t argue with anything you’ve said and I’m too lazy to look it all up and consider the circumstances. However, drivers like Vettel and Hamilton were bankrolled by their teams because of their tallent, PM is banrolled with oil money because of national pride. There is a difference in my opinion, and quite an acute one.

        Here’s my thing with Maldonaldo; often it appears (I obviously cannot be sure) that he DELIBERATELY causes accidents, smiles that crocodile smile and sleeps soundly.

      14. Nathan Jones says:

        KGBVD, does Lewis still make them? Seems to me he’s driven a pretty much faultless campaign this year. Irrespective of whether you think the Valencia incident was a 50:50, you’d be pretty bold to say it was Lewis’s fault when the other driver wasn’t even on the track.

        I guess some people will never give you a break, no matter how much you change. Pastor should perhaps be mindful of that.

      15. KGBVD says:

        @ Wayne, agreed, the deliberateness of it is very troublesome.

        @ Nathan Jones, more so than other of his experience. Bahrain and his reaction to Rosberg’s defense stands out this year. That could have been an almighty ‘racing incident’.

    4. tony cuxson says:

      When somebody is seriously hurt or worse who will sue the fia for allowing this human wrecking ball to threaten other peoples lives?

    5. Goks says:

      We all miss the point of the Maldonado crash into Hamilton in Valencia. Look at Alonso when Webber came to pass him 4 laps to go. He knew there was no point defending the 1st position. LH should have yielded simple. PM of course keeps taking people out so his “criminal” record will always count. At Silverstone, His car slid and then hit Perez. My heart stops whenever Kobayashi tries to overtake anyone. its always a Kamikaze effort. KK was like PM a few years back. now he has cooled down a bit. I Hope PM cools down very fast. Remember d days MS & Montoya were always taking each other out @ the 1st corner?

      1. gudien says:

        Well said. How about the days Schumacher and Damon Hill were at it. Or Prost and Senna. Or how about more recently Hamilton? Grosjean this year? Get the point?

      2. Jim Dee says:

        “LH should have yielded simple”

        He wasn’t being lapped and in any case why should he yield to cars that are off the track. Unless you are deliberately stirring the, you know what, your perspective is quite ridiculous.

      3. Bobby says:

        Your logic implies that it’s okay for a driver who is off the track to push another competitor into a wall if that competitor ‘should have’ had the foresight to know that he was about to put into a wall.

        Maldonado has proven time and again to be reckless and unsportsmanlike – a one race ban (suspended or immediate) is due in my opinion.

      4. chisel68 says:

        I agree Goks. But you’ll never convince the HAM fans.

        Clever drivers know when their tyres are shot and dont try to outbrake someone who is obviously faster than them AND have more grip. LH didn’t and pushed PM off the track – fact. PM avoided the contact and saved LH blushes. (The current verbal barrage PM is copping at the moment for the Perez incident proves that).

        It was when PM re-joined the track that he beached his car on the curb and lost steering. View it again and you can see he tried to see away from LH but can’t. Yes, he should have gone left earlier and gone over the speed bumps off track, but its hindsight is 20/20. PM got the deserved penalty (drive through). more than that would have been unjust. (In Valencia, LH looked almost relieved on TV that the heat was on PM and not why he tried to out-brake someone on shot tyres!).

        In the Perez incident, they are both on cold tyres and both racing for position. PM is ahead on the inside and has the line. They touch. Not an unusual occurrence in that circumstance all things considered. But as Allan McNish pointed out on Sky, the same corner with PM and KR and KR sees what action needs to be taken and backs off. If KR was far enough ahead he would’ve gone round PM, but he wasn’t so he backed off. Perez didn’t back off and….

    6. Buddy says:

      Don’t ask why, but the Maldonado’s demeanour reminds me of this little scene…..

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVQ8byG2mY8

      1. gudien says:

        Perez’ demeanor reminds me of a spoiled little rich kid whom is accustomed to getting what he wants. How many other drivers are out there slandering their competitors?

      2. Jim Dee says:

        Actually Maldonado is the pay to play guy who losses his head when he doesn’t get what he wants. Also assuming someone accepts your point for some reason you have pluralized competitors.

      3. Carlo says:

        HAHAHA brilliant!

      4. Wayne says:

        I knew it was going to be Scarface lol!

      5. Nathan Jones says:

        Brilliant! Just brilliant! That is exactly the way I see him, I just didn’t have such an appropriate way of summing him up. Superb.

        Anyone who for a moment thought he did not crash into people with intent should check out how he viciously wiped out Grosjean at Hockenheim when they were in the lower formula. It’s on youtube.

        All you Pastor apologists, I dare you to watch it and try to explain it away!

      6. Nathan Jones says:

        Just seen a brilliant clip that reminds me of Maldonado. Very appropriate: includes a race, things being barged out of the way, and a competitor’s race being ruined.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jw8uic5cU1w

        Cut from the same cloth!

  2. Alastair Walker says:

    If Lewis Hamilton had driven as recklessly and dangerously as Maldonado, he would have been banned from F1 by now.

    It’s time that Maldonado had his FIA Super Licence revoked.

    1. Wayne says:

      Personally, I think that Maldonaldo is deliberately out to make just this reputation for himself so drivers will think twice about trying to overtake him and give him more ‘respect’ on track than he deserves. He is a typical bully – spoilt, brash and without conscience.

      Sometimes we have lovable rogues in sport (McEnroe), or rogues whome we forgive a bit for their genius (Schumacher) but there is nothing to like about this guy at all.

      1. Davexxx says:

        I agree. When Mal and Ham started on the race next to each other, it was noticeable how Ham tried to keep well clear of Mal, to avoid any further incident. Sadly this means Mal got his way – to ‘teach’ Ham to stay clear of him.
        The way Webber and Alonso treated each other in the last laps of the race showed the way it should be done – with respect to each other.

      2. KGBVD says:

        He got Williams its first win in yonks.
        That’s +1 in my book.

        He needs to be tempered, but he’s damn good, and has oodles of cash. He’ll be around a VERY long time.

      3. TitanRacer says:

        in the end, more than just the driver is at fault here. he is merely one cog in the whole of the Team from Sir Frank on down the line. how is that driver coach thingy working out??
        if a message is worth delivering, strip Maldo of all his driver points, his win, and all of his contribution to William’s constructor championship points. maybe ban his participation for a bit too. I seem to remember a $100M fine for Spygate which did NOT involve the possibility of bodily harm.
        how ’bout a pay up or shut up and close the doors for an obviously arrogant Team???

      4. Valois says:

        Seriously, this year’s PM’s accidents involve extremely low risk of bodily harm per se. Would we suggest a proportional treatment (strip him from his points so far) for Grosjean this year ou Hamilton last year?

      5. Hmmm…I seem to recall that a certain Brazilian driver also named Senna used to do that in the mid-80′s when he was in the lower formulae and also in F1. All new drivers have to assert themselves when they move into a series. It’s called racing, not “after you my good man”.

    2. Sebastian says:

      So true Lewis gets the worst press why??? I’d hate to say…. Mal is aggressive reckless and needs a serious look at before it’s too late.

    3. Buddy says:

      Most Team bosses have openly critisised their drivers for their mistakes (Boulier on Heidfield and Tost on everyone of his drivers).

      Maldonado has thrown away points due to his aggressive, anger-management-style, road rages.

      I want to know why Frank Williams has been so silent on this one. Clearly the sponsorship money does all the talking…..

      1. gudien says:

        Maldonado wins races for Sir Frank. How many races did Webber, Rosberg, and Barrichello win for him?

      2. Wayne says:

        ‘race’ singular.

      3. timW says:

        Maldonado won one race for Williams, Rubens won many for Ferrari and Brawn and Rosberg has won for Mercedes, if Williams had produced a winning car in the time these drivers raced for the team, then they both would have won in it! The point is Pastor won well in Barcelona with a car that was clearly quicker than the Ferrari and he also benefited greatly from Hamilton’s crazy penalty, however in the other 8 races he has scored a rather dismal 4 points. He has also deliberately driven his car into a fellow competitor at least twice and has been involved in numerous collisions that could fairly be blamed on his aggressive driving style.

      4. Nathan Jones says:

        I think you are missing a few clear factors in your question/analysis:

        - all-new staff at Williams
        - this is the first time in a long time that the Williams has been competitive
        - this is the year of the tyre lottery. The williams was performing better at the race Crashtor won than it had before, or has since. Tyres were clearly a factor at that race.

      5. Valois says:

        Oh, please bury that “tyre lottery” for good.

      6. KGBVD says:

        He’s in his second season. Just like Grosjean, Perez, Ricciardo, Senna, and Karthakeyan, they ALL have made, do make, and will make stupid mistakes at one point or another. He deserves some lee-way with his errors/incidents.

        What SHOULD have happened, was that after Spa last year he should have received a race ban. That was malicious, and he did it again at Monaco. Inexcusable.

        But that doesn’t make him fallible in every single race incident afterward. Particularly against other crash-o-holics (Taz) and other rookies (Perez).

      7. TitanRacer says:

        arrogance in need of a $100M dollar fine…

      8. Buddy says:

        Don’t forget Pastor’s apparent life time ban at Monaco…..he really hasn’t changed and doesn’t respect the rules.

    4. Alberto says:

      I recalled hamilton colliding with massa and plenty other drives (includinf maldonado y monaco) before, he was not given any serious penalty as they are doing with maldonado right now. So brittish fans, what do you think about that?

      1. timW says:

        I think it doesn’t matter what country you come from, but yes I am British. I think the difference is Pastor has on a few occasions deliberately driven into his rivals and this is clearly un acceptable. Your right Lewis has made mistakes in his career, as have all the drivers, but Pastor is making far too many. The point many of us are making is that Maldonado is not being given any serious penalty, a fine and reprimand is nothing.

  3. Tolga YILDIRIM says:

    Kobayashi ok, maldonado im not sure….

  4. Andy I says:

    seems utterly inconsistent that Schumacher can get a 5 place grid drop for driving into Senna, when it seemed that even Bruno had said he had to brake earlier than Schumacher due to his tyres… and yet, Maldonado gets effectively no penalty for taking out Hamilton and Perez (even if this one was a mistake rather than deliberate).

    He ran Kimi off the road at that corner on lap 2 when Kimi tried the same move as Sergio, but Webber and Alonso showed how it should be done through there.

    If you look at Spa last year (which he got away with!), Monacco this year, then Valencia, it does make you wonder. Just compare it to all the penalties Hamilton and Massa got last year!

    1. Brett says:

      This is a good point. Schumacher’s 5 place drop sure seems like a steep penalty now that you have seen the soft slaps on the wrist PM keeps getting.

      Senna was clearly moving under braking when Schumacher hit him.

      PM seems to be getting off very very lightly for the driving he has done. He obviously hates getting passed, because he clearly was when he “lost the rear on cold tires”

      Maybe you should know when a move is done and back out of it.

      I was very sad to hear the BBC team praising PM yet again during qualifying, even having Murray Walker praising him during the rain stoppage in qualifying. I have seen moments of brilliance from PM, but more often than not, I just see anger clouding his judgement. That’s not a good thing to have for a F1 driver.

    2. Wayne says:

      Well said, Andy, Spa last year was the single most outrageous thing I have seen a driver do behind the wheel of an F1 car in recent memory! It makes a mockery of the sport that he can just smile and get away with it.

    3. DanWilliams from Aust says:

      He drives as if he playing a video game.

      PM took out Hamilton in Spa last year, Gosjean on Melb this year, Perez in Monaco FP3, Hamilton in Valencia, drove Kimi off the road and hit Perez in Silverstone.

      Perez has a point, some of those incidents can be argued as ‘racing incidents’ but its too conincidental and too common that they keep involving the same driver.

      PM shows glimpses of speed and brilliance, but currently is just not a consistently smart enough driver to compete at this level with maturity.

      1. RobertS says:

        I agree! good points. he has carried this driving style since before f1. it needs to be addressed by someone. either stewards, williams or driver briefings. I’m sure it probably has already, but we are yet to see any change!

      2. Bobby says:

        Your point about him driving as if he is playing a video game is something I’ve said and thought myself – couldn’t agree more.

    4. Carlo says:

      +1 Very good point

    5. KGBVD says:

      Maldonado is a victim of inconsistent stewarding. He should have been banned for a race (or 2, or 3, or 4) after Spa, but instead, has been able to sally forth unchecked ever since.

      Now, after Monaco, every single racing incident he has been in has been levied at him as his fault (his bash log is no more extensive than Grosjean’s, Hamilton’s or Schumacher’s).

      He needs to learn, but obviously won’t until someone makes him. Otherwise he’s a talent wasted.

    6. Valois says:

      We shouldn’t compare PM’s last two accidents with MSC crash unto Senna, since those were side crashes and the later a crash from behind. Additionally, a crash from behind in the end of a straight poses e MUCH higher risk of bodily harm than a side crash in a turn exit.

  5. Steve W says:

    Hmm, inconsistent stewards…imagine my surprise! But seriously, how can you have more or less the same indiscretion as Valencia but with a different penalty? Hamilton & McLaren/Perez & Sauber lost WDC points because of the incidents. Surely therefore, the punishment should be loss of points for Maldonado/Williams. Not a small fine that is a drop in the ocean when taken in context of driver salaries. Completely unfair on Perez and Sauber.

    1. Andrew says:

      100% agree with this!

      I think Maldonado’s Spainish win went to his head!

    2. Pman says:

      While I do feel Maldanado should have been penalized more heavily, what he did to LH was more shocking. Here Perez was on the outside and Maldanado just did not have the grip to keep to his line. The error is glaring because of his past behaviour but it could just as well have occured between any other 2 drivers.
      Btw in Spain he was penalized because of unsafe rejoining.

      1. Steve says:

        Need I remind you that Hamilton actually pushed Maldonado off the track in Valencia at the exit of the corner. If Maldonado should be punished more for this incident at Silverstone, Hamilton should have been given a punishment for forcing another car off the track in Valencia. These incidents are EXACTLY THE SAME!!!

      2. timW says:

        not really the same, Lewis was holding his line, as he is entitled to do. Pastor then went off the track and instead of turning left and rejoining the track in a safe way he turned right and t boned Lewis! Pastor ran Kimi off the edge of the track at the start of the race in Silverstone then tried it again with Perez but lost control and slid into him. The two accidents are therefore NOT EXACTLY THE SAME as in Valencia as Lewis didn’t lose his car until Pastor drove into him!

      3. Brett says:

        Yeah, not exactly the same at all. On the Hamilton thing, there is exactly one racing line through that complex, which the lead driver is entitled to. PM had no room, so he had to go off track to avoid contact. The driver behind is responsible to avoid contact. The sensible thing to do would be back off a bit, get behind Hamilton, and get him at the next corner. The insane thing to do would be to get upset, and turn right into the other driver in anger. Which one did PM do? Right. NOT the same at all. Just because Hamilton was the slower car at the time does not mean he needs to just hand over the position to a faster driver. He is entitled to defend his position within the rules, which he did.

      4. Steve says:

        Ps… The only difference is that at valencia Maldonado moved out of the way of Hamilton… Had he sat on the outside, then hamilton would’ve hit him, just as Maldonado hit Perez at silverstone. Those who spend their time gnashing their teeth at Maldonado should try getting a little bit of perspective!

      5. Bobby says:

        Hamilton took his normal line into the corner, Maldonado took a line outside the circuit and then chose to rejoin by taking out another competitor when he could have stayed left, rejoined safely and overtaken Hamilton on the following sequence of corners.

        Mal is a liability – I fear it take someone to get injured before they give him a worthwhile punishment.

      6. Craig in SG says:

        20.4 Manoeuvres liable to hinder other drivers, such as deliberate crowding of a car beyond the edge of the track or any other abnormal change of direction, are not permitted.

        This means you are NOT entitled to maintain the “racing line” if it means that the guy beside you will be forced off track.

  6. Alex says:

    Maldonado lost his car,is clear that he did not want to hit Perez but of course he has a “criminal” record and therefore people would always loved to say he is a dirty driver. Anyway Williams Team should talk to him because next time he will get a 1 race suspension.
    A pity because Perez looked strong,if not for Sauber’s mistake on Q2 he should had not been fighthing with Maldonado.

    1. FerrariFan says:

      Agree with you. This time it did look like a racing incident. But I feel sad for Perez.

    2. daphne says:

      Yes, he lost the car. But this is F1, not bumper cars. You can’t use another car alongside to help stop your slide – you’re supposed to be much, much better than that.
      This is F1: Professionals Sport.

      I look forward to a race where Maldonado runs clean and pure. He is quick, no doubt.

      1. DonSimon says:

        Agree 100%. Fine on the playstation, not fine at Silverstone. I also think Perez should do his talking in the stewards room though. He spoke on behalf of other drivers and that isn’t fair.

      2. david says:

        Sorry, some of these comments are inflammatory and vitriolic. Clearly, there have been issues with PM particularly in Monaco with Perez. However, this weekend was simply a driving incident. There was no deliberate attempt to drive Perez off the road! He got oversteer and lost the rear and then slid into Perez. Everyone seems to have forgotten incidents in the past such as Webber t-boning LH in Singapore. No penalty imposed on Webber then. The big issue is we have now got to the stage where we want to punish all drivers for any accident that happens! however, it is only the ones caught on TV that seem to count. These types of incidents, such as MS on BS should be ignored and they should simply address dangerous driving.

      3. Jay West says:

        Very good point Don. Sergio really lost his cool with the reporters. He should have saved it for the stewards, as you said. I though Lewis handled it much, much better last race. Let the incident speak for itself. Cheers.

      4. KGBVD says:

        Even DC said that Perez should have known the risks putting his car on the outside. Given this year’s pirellis, you’d think that passing on the outside would be a BIT more perilous, and should be approached with a BIT more caution.

        Sad for Perez, but not Maldonado’s fault.

    3. daphne says:

      *Cough*, Ahem…I left out the word “another”.
      “I look forward to a another race …”

  7. Mike from Colombia says:

    Schumacher unintentionally runs into the back of Bruno Senna and gets a grid penalty.

    Maldonado is a dirty driver, a repeat offender and has no class whatsoever.

    a) deliberately ran into Hamilton at Spa 2011
    b) deliberately ran into the side of Perez at Monaco 2012
    c) was embarrassed by lack of racecraft and being made to look like the pay driver he is when Hamilton made life difficult for him in Valancia 2012
    d) Tried to squeeze out Perez and then decided to barge him off the track today

    Perez is right. Maldonado has no respect and should be reprimanded.

    1. Ross Dixon says:

      I would also add the crash into Hamilton in Monaco last year as his fault too. Martin Brundle said from the in car view it was clear that PM turned in sooo early on purpose. If you watch it you will see that despite being hit by LH mid corner. His inside right tyre easily goes way over the kerb that he usually is nowhere near.

      1. Ross Dixon says:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NSikqc3WQY&feature=youtube_gdata_player

        Pause at about 1-2 seconds and look at the position of his car just before the corner. He swiped LH here too!!!

      2. Pman says:

        Sorry but in that case it was clearly LH’s fault. he was not alongside and PM had the line. LH would have been effectively overtaking by cutting the corner.
        What happened in Velencia was clearly PM’s fault and it was shocking.
        But you can’t deny that he is fast. He makes Senna look like a schoolboy

      3. JamesMP says:

        I’d like to point out to those who don’t remember the incident with Hamo in Spa, that the Quallifying session was already over before Pastor turned in on Lewis. Ever since that I’ve felt that Pastor has no right to be in F1.

      4. Steve says:

        Please also remember that there were 2 drivers that were punished for Spa 2011. Maldonado AND Hamilton. Maldonado turned left into Hamilton yes, but Hamilton also turned right into Maldonado… Hence why BOTH received punishments.

      5. Spinodontosaurus says:

        No Steve, Hamilton did not turn right into Maldonado. He was following the regular line – which goes to the right – and Maldonado turned left straight into him.

      6. Steve says:

        Go and watch the coverage again. Out of la source Hamilton jinks right not once but twice. This is not to excuse Maldonado, but just bear in mind that other drivers try intimidation as well!

      7. Spinodontosaurus says:

        I have seen it, he turns to the right, the same direction the track goes a bit down the road. He cant go right, because Maldonado is there. He then eases right when the track does and encounters a Williams turning left.

    2. sut says:

      Frank Williams has been rather quiet lately.

      After a great win I thought PM had outgrown aggressive driving and earned my respect as a racer.

      He’s undone all the good he’d done to his reputation.

      I’ll reiterate my comment after his win when all the comments were hailing him as the next big thing, ie. lets see how he goes for the rest of the season before we see if he’s really worthy of taking Rubens place.

      Rubens is not perfect but you’d never see him driving like a thug. Let PM have another year in GP2 to grow up and bring back Rubens to show some finesse. Bruno can learn from Rubens and develop. Hopefully he won’t learn from Maldonado.

  8. Michael says:

    Did the stewards who imposed this penalty not watch the whole race? There were many overtaking moves on the outside of that corner and none of those going around the outside were deliberately taken out, as was Perez. Maldonado will one day cause a serios accident by his reckless actions.

  9. Methusalem says:

    Isn’t it amazing, I was able to foresee MP causing some problems:

    http://www.jamesallenonf1.com/2012/07/alonso-grabs-first-pole-for-two-years-as-british-stars-struggle-in-rain/

    Déjà Vu!?

    1. Joe B says:

      To be fair, predicting PM will smash into someone is akin to predicting Button will struggle with grip over the course of a weekend…

      1. Jim Dee says:

        Or that McLaren would botch a pit stop.

  10. Mike from Colombia says:

    Fining Kobayashi is ridiculous.

    So, he intended on causing injury to one of his mechanics in the closely-knit Sauber team?

    Absurd. In the days of refuelling we had cars dragging fuel hoses off with them which is potentially much more dangerous…can’t remember any fines for this.

    1. Galapago555 says:

      The fine was imposed for “a very dangerous manoeuvre which had potentially serious implications”.

      Obviously if the stewards had evidence of it being intentional the penalty would have been quite different.

      1. Rob says:

        Its ridiculous that a simple mistake that hurts your own team is viewed more seriously than a repeat offender that wrecks other teams races.

        What exactly is the purpose of Kobayashi’s fine, is it supposed to tell him that if he was planning on doing it again in the next race he shouldn’t?

        I am sure Kobayashi is well aware that he shouldn’t run over his own mechanics and regrets his error, I am also pretty sure Maldonaldo doesn’t have any such thoughts about running into other drivers in the future.

      2. mario says:

        +1
        very well said

      3. yugin says:

        Very true. A reprimand would have sufficed but the fine was pointless.

      4. I think Galapago555 was only adding a point about intent. I don’t think he disagrees on the ridiculous aspect of it.

      5. David Ryan says:

        Irrespective of the fact that it most certainly wasn’t an intentional incident, the fact remains that Kamui was the only one to misjudge his braking in such a manner and thus hit his pitcrew. The wording of Article 30.13 is “At no time may a car be driven unnecessarily slowly, erratically or in a manner which could be deemed potentially dangerous to other drivers or any other person” – and it is that last part which he has unfortunately been caught out by. By leaving his braking until the concrete section, he put his crew in danger. It was a genuine error, and one he won’t be the first or last to make, but that is why a penalty has been applied. The fine is the same as others have been hit with in similar circumstances, so there is precedent however harsh it seems.

      6. Bobby says:

        Agree wholeheartedly. Meaningless fine.

      7. Trent says:

        But clearly the motivation to avoid running over your own crew is:
        a. Not to injure the members of your pit crew
        b. Not to lose time through such an incident and therefore ruin your race.
        Do you think Kobayashi will be more careful next time because of the fine, or because of a. and b. above?
        The fine, as Mike says above, is absurd.

      8. daphne says:

        But hold on, it wasn’t an on-track manoeuvre; it was a purely unintentional mistake / loss of grip.

        Pirelli should be the ones under the microscope here, I think. Talk about passing the buck…!

        It was very uncharacteristic of Kobayashi.

        Very unfair penalty.

      9. Stickymart says:

        Completely agree with you. There is no way that Kobayashi wanted to hit his own crew!

      10. sut says:

        Agreed.

        It wasn’t reckless and am sure KK feels bad. Wouldn’t be so daft if the fine money went into helping the injured mechanics or their families.

        James, where does the fine money typically end up ?

  11. T Nelan Esq says:

    I would have swopped the punishments between Pastor and Kamui. What Kamui did was not intentional, but what Pastor did possibly was. Even though every case turns on its own facts, Pastor has a history of getting angry and lashing out, using his car as a weapon. Surely that can’t continue.

    1. DB says:

      Actually, the penalties are swapped. Maldonado got the €25k fine. At least according to http://www.formula1.com/news/headlines/2012/7/13566.html.

      Still, considering it’s a repeated offence, grip positions would be more appropriate than the reprimand, imo.

  12. Gilraen says:

    This time avond this penalty seems fair. BUT, take into consideration in how many incidents hè was already involved in, I think a grid penalty would have been more appropriate.

  13. Rob Newman says:

    It is not that easy to compare certain incidents even if they are similar. Some times adding a 20 second penalty or even a drive thru will make no difference if the driver can pay the penalty and still regain his place. A grid penalty will also make no sense if the driver always starts from back of the grid.

    Will any kind of penalty ever make sense if it was given to Karthikeyan? He always qualifies last and always finishes last.

    Kobayashi’s incident is serious and he should have taken more care especially after de Villota’s accident. But what sense does that Euro 25K penalty is going to make? In the end that was an accident.

    1. Peter C says:

      Especially after de Villota’s accident?

      Where is the similarity,please?

  14. Steve Rowlands says:

    I think that Maldonado needed to be taught to respect other drivers on track before he causes a serious incident. A small fine and a reprimand hardly does the job. Its almost condoning what he did in the name of competition !

  15. goferet says:

    I always love it whenever our Nigel Mansell is named as part of the stewards for a race weekend.

    Not only does our Lewis avoid visiting the headmaster’s office but common sense also seems to reign whenever Mansell is in charge.

    Shame the FIA do not see the validity of having the same stewards every race = consistency.

    1. If we had the same stewards at every race, we’d complain about transparency.

      Things are fine as they are now. Penalties will even out throughout the season.

  16. xrr says:

    This guy has nothing to say if someone hit him deliberately.

    Oh and a few words for race stewards. I wonder what is the use of these puppets. I dont think anyone will ever notice them if they will not exists for the coming races.

    I can write here tens of samples which they gave very absurd decisions.

  17. Dave K says:

    To be quite frank, Pastor has a long history of incidents going back to his pre-F1 days.

    Don’t forget Maldonado was banned for life from Monaco when he nearly killed a marshal, but due to his backing from Hugo Chavez, that ban was lifted.

    I have no problem with aggressive driving, Maldonado unfortunately takes it a bit far. I know some people have been in the habit of talking about Ayrton Senna’s defense when it comes to Maldonado. The big difference between Ayrton and many other drivers, that has been lost on people, is that Senna did know when to yield position. He would make it tough and uncomfortable for the attacking driver, yet he avoided situations like the ones Pastor routinely finds himself in.

    I think at minimum, Maldonado should have received a 1 race ban just as a deterrent and reminder for the future. Instead he gets nothing more than a slap on the wrist. Goes to show how much his money and Venezuelan backing matters. A shame because he is a dangerous driver to be near on the track. F1 is setting a very bad example for future drivers and driving.

    1. Gerard says:

      I agree with you on Maldonado deserving a harsher penalty…
      but blaming the stewards lack of standards on Venezuelan influence is nonsense.
      Yes, the only reason why he drives a F1 car every couple of weeks is because he’s got his government backing, which Williams badly needs (His extraordinary win this year notwithstanding).
      But thinking that Hugo’s influence matters at the whole F1 level, is giving him far too much credit that he doesn’t deserve. (Probably, his aides will print your post and show it to him to cheer him up).
      The stewards are just screwing up…

    2. Wade Parmino says:

      I would have to disagree regarding your comments that A Senna was more measured in his aggressive driving. Senna drove just as aggressively and dangerously as Maldonado is now. I think people (myself included) take a very nostalgic and rather ‘rose colored’ view of Senna because of his legend.

      Anyway, if Maldonado remains in F1 long enough to start winning races on a regular basis and become champion, peoples attitudes towards him will become increasingly hypocritical. Suddenly his aggressive driving will be OK and he will even be loved for it.

      My point is that people are a fickle bunch. All over-aggressive and dangerous driving should be viewed with the same criticism regardless of who the driver is.

      1. David Ryan says:

        Agreed on the Senna comments – for all his undoubted talent, he had no qualms whatsoever about ramming rivals off the circuit both before and during his F1 career. Just ask Martin Brundle and Alain Prost, among others. I would also say what Senna did in his career was far more dangerous – particularly that Suzuka first corner collision – than anything Maldonado has done in F1 to date, and I can only hope Maldonado never does stoop to that low a level.

  18. Andrew says:

    Considering he earns millions, it will nothing to him. It wasnt as bad as the Monaco crash but clearly not learned.

    They said incident was of a serious nature but small fine. Kobayashi fined more for an accident – he obviously didnt mean to crash into his own team!

  19. Phil says:

    I think you question says it all.

    It’s just another example of inconsistent penalties from the stewards.

    Don’t get me wrong, today’s incident looked more like an accident than some of his previous altercations but the boy has ‘form’, lot’s of it.

    10,000 euros isn’t even a slap on the wrist for an F1 driver and a reprimand?

  20. Matt W says:

    Excellent stewarding all round there, nice to see the consistency with the 5 place grid penalty Schumacher got after Spain. How can F1 continually officiate itself so poorly. They needed to wait over an hour and a half to decide that?

    If F1 wants to be pay per view then they have to sort out the amateur officiating. I and millions of others won’t pay to see decisions made of flavour of the week decisions. They seem to get it wrong from minor calls to major calls every week.

    Drive through for Senna for doing nothing wrong in Valencia compared to a slap on the wrist for Maldonado this week is a joke.

    1. daphne says:

      Other people here are calling for a standardised racing steward lineup, and it’s a great point. “Guest” appearances by “famous names” is just not helping matters; it’s confusing them. One person, or group of people, need to have a firm hand on the rule book, and their word is law. Consistency should be the modus-operandi, because there really is none at present, in this, the most expensive sport in the world.
      Where are all the great minds, when very impactful decisions are made?

  21. dt says:

    I think Maldonado’s fine a bit harsh. On the replay you could see Maldonado’s car hit a bump, lifting the inside rear wheel off the ground and making the car lurch towards Perez. Didn’t look like a deliberate ram of the kind that Michael Schumacher used to get away with. A racing accident only.

    1. Mr Squiggle says:

      I agree, I thought Perez actually squeezed Maldonado onto the inside kerb of of the left hander, which pushed PM’s car into the slide. Maldonado did well to hold on to the car.

      Don’t get me wrong though, some of PMs earlier incidents were pretty serious indiscretions.

      It would be a shame if he becomes the Andrea De Cesaris of this era

      1. Greg (Aus) says:

        Not sure how you figure that one, there was room for a third car between Maldonado and the kerb.

  22. Ral says:

    I don’t understand these fines at all. Maldonado took someone out of the race and gets fined 10k. Kobayashi hits some of his own pit crew and gets fined 25k.

    What are the lessons they want these two drivers to learn? “Don’t take out other drivers”, fair enough. “Be careful in the pit lane”, also fair enough.

    But I’m pretty sure Kobayashi will be a bit more careful in the future regardless of being fined, because let’s face it, he doesn’t want to hit his own crew or anyone else in the legs. (Although, I do seem to remember him hitting someone in a pit stop before?)

    On the other hand, it doesn’t seem like Maldonado is particularly quick on the pickup when it comes to driving, to the point where now they aren’t giving him normal racing penalties any more but are resorting to monetary punishment. The levels of the penalties handed out just seems a bit counter intuitive to me and it has to be said, it wouldn’t have been obvious if they hadn’t been handed out in the same weekend.

  23. Dave Aston says:

    I respect Maldonado’s ability a lot, but I do think some of the incidents he’s been involved in have been over the top. The one that surprised me the most was with Hamilton on the slow down lap after qualifying at Spa last year; I think he should have been sent home for that one. Monaco with Perez was a bad look too. As for today, I kind of agree with Brundle; he seemed to have overcooked it mid corner more than driven into Perez deliberately, but it was messy nonetheless. I reckon his penalty today was applied with hindsight re some of his previous work. I think the Kamui fine was about right. I’m a huge fan, but it was a really bad one for sure. Speaking of penalties, what is going on with Marussia? Have the FIA or FOM made a statement yet? I haven’t seen one, so maybe I missed it. If they haven’t, it’s a disgrace.

  24. SteveR says:

    ahahahaha these stewards need guidance….or at the least POLICING! They charged Vergne a bundle of money and grid places in Valencia for taking out a Caterham and Maldo got a slap on the wrist for taking out a driver in a podium place! Now, how could one man be punished harder for injuring his one teammates in the pits than the other man who pulled off the same damaging moves TWO races in a row….and unsympathetic afterwards too?? Very inconsistent even leading to incompetence i say!

  25. d.h. says:

    Unless he gets out of this way of driving, he is going to cause a major accident. After last years incidents and the growing list this season, he just seems to be getting worse.

    You watch others racing, Alonso and Webber today, there is a mutual respect, so they race hard and fair.

    Maldonado’h, just races like he is in a bumper car. His win in Barcelona seems to have gone to his head, and he must think he is untouchable.

    1. tom in adelaide says:

      Maldonado’h – good one :D

  26. AndyB says:

    I think that at the least Maldonado should have a suspended race ban handed out, so that future infractions have a serious impact, otherwise he will not accept the seriousness of his actions.

    On the whole, his record is suspect (swiping Hamilton at Spa and Perez at Monaco) while taking others out on a predictable basis while defending far too aggressively. The ideal thing would be to remove his superlicence due to his deficient mental state and dangerous behaviour.

  27. olivier says:

    What scares me is that this man has a self destructive dark side. It is part of his DNA. He won’t learn from grid/money penalties. His dark side will bring him greatness and ultimately his death. F1 drivers, beware …

    1. Maldonado black flagged

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xee89c_black-flag-pastor-maldonado-gp2-201_auto >> the comments of the tv presenter at 2:20 are very telling … “he just makes silly mistakes”.

    2. Maldonado crashing during red flags:

    http://youtu.be/kt5nt7IdyPs

      1. chris says:

        that is pretty shocking

      2. aezy_doc says:

        A very strange incident. Does anyone know the outcome? Penalties applied etc?

      3. Tank says:

        insane!!!

      4. David Ryan says:

        “Rams off the road” is something of an exaggeration I feel – that is a fairly classic example of open-wheelers locking wheels with predictable consequences. That is why the stewards did not apply a penalty for the incident (as far as I am aware). I would say it’s more a display of clumsiness than deliberate unsportsmanlike conduct.

    1. Russ says:

      Wow this spud should not be allowed to race.ever.Thanks for the links.

    2. Stickymart says:

      “Oh Pastor, you silly boy”

      Pretty much sums it up.

    3. Stickymart says:

      That crash under red flags is awful, he really could have killed someone.

      1. zx6dude says:

        How did Maldonado ever get an FIA Super Licence???
        Thanks for the links

      2. CarlH says:

        [mod]

        It shouldn’t matter how much talent he has, if he continues to drive like he is then he should be kicked out.

        I remember Frank Williams praising his attitude earlier in the season, I wonder what he’s thinking now? He said Maldonado had a very ‘un-latin’ demeanour, which frankly doesn’t seem true.

        A seat in Nascar awaits…….

  28. RobertS says:

    As i said in the previous post, Maldonado is involved in too many incidents and drives too aggressively. I think this punishment is again too light. They should give him a suspended race ban providing he has no more incidents until a certain point in the year. Or something similar this way he would reign in his driving. Kobayashi’s penalty seems correct as it was dangerous, but when compared to Maldonados i do wonder if it was excessive

  29. David Ryan says:

    Kobayashi’s fine was inevitable unfortunately – much as it was a genuine error, pitlane safety is something they’ve tightened up on considerably in recent years and that amount is in line with previous penalties. As for Maldonado-Perez, I agreed with the BBC that it was a racing incident only so I wouldn’t agree with one penalty and I certainly don’t agree with two. The stewards are basically saying this was not only more serious than the incidents in Monaco and Valencia, but on a par with Jean-Eric Vergne’s swerve across Heikki Kovalainen in Valencia. That to me seems utter nonsense. The inconsistency of the stewards is doing their credibility no favours in my opinion.

    1. Chris says:

      I’m surprised with Kamui’s fine if I’m honest. It was a genuine mistake and not deliberate in the slightest. The BBC did a good clip on it actually with Eddie and Jake showing that there is no room at all for the front tyre guys to move out of the way as being hemmed in by the air bottles and the gantry stand. This is what needs to be altered as they were trying to get out of the way but were trapped. Given the nature of the pit lane and cars coming into such a small crammed space at about 50mph there needs to be sufficient room for the crew to at least be able to get out of the way if they need to.

      1. David Ryan says:

        Agree that it was a genuine mistake – unfortunately, the wording of Article 30.13 is such that any pitlane incident like that is going to result in a penalty. There are certainly issues with Sauber’s pitbox which need addressing though, as you say, and given it’s likely to be the team which pays the fine it’s probably as much a wake-up call for them as anything. Also, the other penalties available would penalise Kamui personally so maybe they felt that a fine was the most fair one to apply.

  30. Rupert Richardson says:

    NO; I think Pastor Maldonado IS a danger and should have his licence suspended for at least 1 race. He seems to think his car is a weapon, rather than a tool, and needs to learn. I’m quite surprised that Frank Williams puts up with it – but then there’s always the money.

  31. Richard D says:

    Maldonado’s penalty is not enough! In his short F1 career he has been guilty of taking more drivers out than all the others put together. He is not safe to allow on the grid unless he can learn to behave and 10,000 euro fine is hardly likely to do that.

    Seems a fair penalty for Kobayashi; if an F1 driver can’t point his car in the right direction at 60kph he deserves to be punished.

  32. Esplanadist says:

    MALDO:

    I was about to join the chorus of condemnation of PM, when it struck me: We need a pantomime baddie figure in F1.
    Ever since Monaco 2006 we haven’t had a dastardly character to spice up the show a little (not that it isn’t exciting enough at present)
    MSC is now much older and wiser. Some thought Kobayashi might step in, but he’s been good as gold.
    Pastor is your man. He can look pretty mean without trying, although a gap in the upper teeth and a tattoo or two on the neck won’t harm. Growling at the BBC is also recommended, a fag in the mouth, maybe a pirate’s scarf with all the logos on instead of the usual cap.
    I noticed in Valencia as he was escorted to the stewards office he was smiling a real evil smile!!
    All I ask is he keeps away from all six F1 champs on the track: but with the rest he can have his evil unsporting way unmolested

    1. wing8 says:

      L O L !

    2. Tork says:

      Monaco 2006?

    3. olivier says:

      +1

      He clearly is the Darth Vader of F1. He wants to be feared.

      Maldo, if you’re reading this. Don’t mess with the F1 Champions on track! It’s uncool & pointless. Keep them on the edge if you are able to. But please, don’t ruin their races by being a passenger of your car.

    4. Nathan Jones says:

      Lewis: Pastor, geezer, I’ve been there before, you don’t want a rep as an aggressive driver. It hurts.
      Pastor: Luis, what you are talking about?
      Sergio: Estas stupido? You take me out today, you take Lewis out at Balentheeya, you swipe Lewis at Spa, you swipe me at Monaco? Manana you kill me!
      Pastor: Checo, I lost the car on all those occassions. Didn’t you hear me say that after every incident? Very obvious. You should be more worried about Kamui killing your crew. Bad boy, Kamui is.
      Sergio *splutter* Estas loco?!! That was no way as bad as your crash. You use your car like a bandido. The FIA are political, they turn blind eye. They never punish right people
      Lewis: A-men to that, brother.
      Pastor: Luis, you no angel yourself.
      Lewis: Mate, take a look at how I’ve changed my style this year. Good, no? I’m getting results. The F1 press ain’t taking pot shots at me. I’m bringing home the bacon for the team while me team mate is moaning about turning on front light bulbs or something, my team love me, although I’m starting to slightly despise them – but that’s an aside, I digress. It’s good, no?
      Pastor: Luis, that is the difference between you and me. You are answerable to team as you get paid £100m by McLaren, I pay Frank £100m. You see what I say?
      Lewis: Er … you’re rubbish?
      Pastor: Luis … do you want me to pick up the phone?
      Lewis: … if … you want to. Is it a new model? Iphone 5?
      Pastor: Santa Maria! Do you not understand a veiled threat when you hear one? I give you physical threats on the track and you no understand, now I give a verbal one and you no understand. What do I do? Knock you over in a car???
      Sergio: I see, you think to intimidate us with your sugar daddy, Hugo Chavez.
      Pastor: *sardonic laugh* ha .. ha .. ha .. si, you no wanna mess with Daddy Hugo.
      Sergio: Be careful, Pastor. My own sugar daddy, Carlos Slim, could buy Venezuela twice over.
      Pastor: Oh, so you want a Mexican stand-off, Checo. Very well. Call your pistoleros, I call mine. We do this old fashioned way.
      Lewis: Er … lads, I’m gonna leave you here. Just remembered I got a contract to negotiate in Austria.

      1. Jay West says:

        Nathan: Way too many posters here are way too concerned about Hugo Chavez. And Nathan here seems to suffer from a “sugar daddy” complex.

      2. Nathan Jones says:

        Haha, you need to cool your jets, mate. It was just a bit of fun. I’m not trying to turn this into PlanetF1.

        Why don’t you have a go at David Cameron, I promise not to get offended.

        Relax.

      3. BurgerF1 says:

        Funniest post I’ve read in a long while. Well done.

        Today’s MAL is yesterday’s HAM and yesteryear’s MSC. The guy will learn to ease off when Frank W. whispers in his ear about bending too many of his (rather fastish) cars, and losing the team too many points. Maybe they’ll parachute Patrick Head in for a little “driver education”.

  33. The penalty on Kobayashi seems a little harsh bearing in mind that it was clearly an accident and there was NO WAY he was trying to do anything unusual; he made a mistake, pure and simple.

    I’m not sure whether Maldonado just lost the back end momentarily today which caused him to hit Perez; I guess that’s why he got such a small punishment today.

    What worries me more is that on two occasions he’s *deliberately* driven into other cars (Hamilton at Spa last year and Perez in Monaco this year). Even at low speeds, this is ridiculously stupid and dangerous, not only for himself and the other driver, but also marshals and spectators nearby. Doing it once could be excused as a momentary lapse of reason; however he’s done it twice now. Who’s to say that next time it won’t be on the entrance to Parabolica or 130R, resulting in a massive accident and fatalities? He shouldn’t be racing in my opinion – maybe a ban is too harsh but he should have been suspended after Monaco.

  34. Luke Potter says:

    All I can say is that I hope that Kamui’s €25,000 will be shared between the mechanics he hit. Why should the FIA profit?

  35. Julian Smallwood says:

    I don’t normally post but do really appreciate your site, thank you.
    The KK issue seems a bit strange but “rules are rules”, however, Maldonado is now out of control in my view. I am very “old school” as someone who grew up with the likes of a rather older , and sadly missed, Mexican racer and adored Gilles and therefore love hard racers and risk but Maldonado seems not merely a danger but entirely unsporting. I feel it is time for the FIA/stewards to act and would love to hear other peoples’ views.

    1. IgMi says:

      I agree with your comment, Julian! I was looking for the word to describe Maldonaldo’s driving style, and you found it – unsporting. I totally accept that aggressiveness and danger are a part of F1, but when a driver goes overboard with them it becomes unsporting – and that is not a part of F1 sport. Thanks!

      1. zx6dude says:

        +1 Aggressiveness is OK, even welcomed. Unfortunately Maldonado isn’t aggressive. he is dangerous and unsporting.

  36. shakaku says:

    I’m not particularly fond of Maldonado, but it was obvious it was unintentional racing incident.

    He had cold tires, braked too late and got out of shape. I think this kind of decisions hurt racing in the long run.

    Also following this retarded stewards logic, why wasn’t he then punished for pushing Kimi out in the same corner on the 1st or 2nd lap.

    1. Tank says:

      I agree with all of your comments.

      But to answer the post question, he should have gotten a grid penalty. The stewarding process has become ever more subjective and I am glad it is going to be looked at by the fia. Although I am skeptical that it will make a difference.

  37. Maldonado is downright dangerous and is a rogue driver. Ever since he bumped Hamilton in Spa, I had the absolute minimal amount of respect for the guy. And despite the win in Spain, he remains an overtly aggressive driver with a ham handed approach to racing which is NOT what F1 needs.

  38. CaterhamElise says:

    Agree with Perez. How many chances is he going to get? How many cars does he have to wreck before he gets a serious reprimand? Drivers make one little mistake and the stewards punish them, yet Pastor seems to continue to get away with his driving.

    He is one of the most frustrating drivers. I mean he could have got rid of his pay driver negative connotation if he would have these lapses of common sense. He could be a fan favorite if he’d learn how to make better passes. He can be good, and even brilliant at times, but he continues to make these terrible mistakes. I’ve never seen a driver take himself out of so many points.

  39. Antonio Palmiotto says:

    Just wait and see until he ruins the race at some Alonsos or Vettels… then i bet FIA will finally act. Let’s hope no one will hurt itself in the process.

  40. Elie says:

    Yeah I said last race that Maldonado needed a serious talking to! Oddly enough I did not agree with Sergio on this – whilst Maldonado was at fault he was racing for position and he could not leave Sergio room cause he was sliding. So I don’t think it was as silly as some of his other moves but he does need to watch his pace through the corners and keep control. I think a bigger fine was warranted.

    As for Kamui well that was very silly also and he acknowledged it so I think the fine was adequate. Nobody would enjoy hurting their own team and i hope they are all okay !. Maybe Kamuis stops will be much slower now as the mechanics will be hiding in the garage until he is stopped !

  41. Nathan says:

    Rediculous

    Last race grid penalties were handed out. This race we have fines. Where exactly is the consistency behind this penalty system. Do they just pick the penalty out of a hat at random.

    Maldonado needs a ban to realise the danger he is causing. It seems like the FIA are waiting for him to kill someone before taking the correct actions.

  42. Jonathan (hat eater extraordinaire) says:

    Hmm…Kobayashi hitting his pit crew was obviously an accident…..McDonaldo hitting Perez deliberate….I don’t get it.

    1. Brisbane Bill says:

      I guess the difference is that Perez has a survival cell strapped around him whereas the pit crew suffer injury from the smallest of impacts. Therefore, the message being sent by the stewards is that trying to gain an advantage in the pits through speeding, late breaking or other unsafe manouvers cannot be tolerated due to the potential direct impact on human safety. Whereas a collision between cars at a slow point in the corner whilst legitimately racing may rob the other driver of a finish but is significantly less likely to result in injury.

      1. Wade Parmino says:

        I concur.

  43. Denny says:

    I think any driver would rather pay a fine than have a grid penalty next race. While this particular accident was not that dangerous, considering the recent history, Maldonado got away with it again. It is nice to have drivers on the grid who attack and go for overtake, but not those who constantly crash into others. It’s definitely getting other drivers frustrated and the penalties have been giving out randomly for quite a while now. In regards to Kobayashi accident, the fine seems to be reasonable.

  44. splott says:

    Once upon a time it was acceptable for prost and Senna to clash on track and schuey to clobber Hill to win a championship and defend a position…not so these days. In the pits there could be carnage so kobayashi certainly deserves a huge slap, and maybe a trip to stoke mandaville to meet people with paralysing injuries. Maldonado on the other hand was racing. Yes he needs a talking to, but a fine does little to deter a racer surely? Either time penalty or grid penalty and if its persistent then race bans and ultimately remove a licence. Which did the manoeuvre deserve? Looked to ne like a little too much aggression in defence…..but perez was not ahead. 10k and 5 place drop next time would seem better assuming telemetry proves he steered towards perez….ie deliberate.

  45. wildbob says:

    Completely inconsistent and reprimands mean nothing. He should have got a 5 place penalty for his lewis incident and a reprimand, and another 5 place penalty for the perez incident.
    Monetary fines will do nothing to stop this sort of behaviour. Complete review of the penalties and a consistent, clear guideline published for stewards to follow…

  46. Staffan Holmberg says:

    Formula1.com has it the other way around: Maldonado 25000 € and Kobayashi 10000 € fines. Still think Koba’s manouvering was worse and could have ended with several crew members hospialized.

  47. William Wilgus says:

    Does Maldonado mean ‘Crash’ in the Venezuelan version of Spanish?

  48. Optimaximal says:

    Why were Williams in the last pit box anyway? I thought the order was decided on based on 2011′s championship order and, despite the disaster that was 2011, they still beat the new teams.

    If they were further up the pits (i.e. where i’d expect them to be), Perez may have jumped Maldonaldo and they wouldn’t have tangled.

    1. Richard D says:

      Apparently McLaren and Ferrari were moved so that the fans in the grandstands opposite could see them!

  49. the pimp's main prophet says:

    I bet most of the negative comments on Maldonado will come from frustrated Hamilton fans…
    Maldonado’s driving style and attitude actually resembles a lot to that of Hamilton last year. Like then, I don’t expect any further action on Maldonado.

  50. Den says:

    Maldonado should be out of F1! NASCAR fans would love him!

  51. Steve Rogers says:

    Kobayashi’s slide into the mechanics was the more obviously dangerous, but both were merely accidents caused by sudden unexpected loss of grip. They should both be more careful and both admitted this, although Kobayashi was the more definite whereas Maldonado just admitted his tyres were cold. He didn’t actually go as far as saying he should be more careful to maintain grip – but I thought he was well aware of that fact.

  52. Tom L. says:

    According to the official F1 website, it was Maldonado who got the €25,000 fine and the reprimand, and Kobayashi who got €10,000.

  53. Glenn says:

    I think koba should have been given a reprimand and Maldonado should have been given a ten place penalty for the next.

  54. franed says:

    Obviously the stewards have looked at the footage from many angles. I had the impression that Maldonado hit the inside kerbing and was punted outwards into Perez, that was what Murray Walker felt too. However Maldonado did not say this and then apologise, or maybe he did in the stewards office and that’s why the punishment was so small. Perez of course is not in a position to be objective.
    I am not a fan of Maldonado or his backer, Hugo Chavez, both seem a little too fond of aggression.

  55. Daniel MA says:

    Bad luck for Sauber… again. It appeared to me that Maldonado lost control of the car right in the middle of the corner which it wasn´t on purpose obviously but he should’ve known when to back off a little that’s why a penalty was needed and anyway in this time of politically correct drivers having someone like Pastor is a breath of fresh air, when he learns not to crash at every race he will have a lot of supporters.

  56. Dan says:

    you would think more common sense would apply. Kamui was hardly aiming for his crew.

    Pastor on the other hand, is a thug. I dislike his needless aggression. And i greatly dislike his inability to acknowledge fault.

    He should be fined, and if there is a repeat, banned for a race.

  57. Galapago555 says:

    Penalty is too lenient in my opinion, either for the precedents set in similar situations this season and for Maldonado’s previous behaviour.

    Let’s see how the season has been so far in “causing a collision” incidents:
    Malaysia: Karthikeyan, drive through penalty. It wa imposed after the race, therefore 20 seconds were added to his race time
    Spain: Schumacher, 5 place grid drop at the next event (imposed after the race)
    European GP: (i) Senna, drive through penalty; (ii) Kobayashi, five place grid drop at the next race; (iii) Vergne , ten place grid drop at next event and € 25,000 fine; and (iv) Maldonado, drive through penalty (20 seconds added as it was imposed after the race).

    So this is the very first time this season when “causing a collision” is punished just with a fine and a reprimand.

    If we consider both the precedents and Pastor’s personal record (with 5 penalties so far this season), I think that a ten place grid drop could have been a fairer penalty.

  58. Steve Zodiac says:

    Still remember the way he rammed Lewis last year, should be banned for a race or two. Martin Whitmarsh said that Lewis knows what Maldonado is like and, basically,should move over when he comes up behind. That is the attitude to have if you don’t ever want to be champion!

  59. JF says:

    This is not uncommon for young aggressive drivers. A few years back Vettel was called “crash kid”. Last year Hamilton and Massa couldn’t get near each other without one of them hitting the other. Both of those guys had fairly messy early years in general. Schumacher, Montoya, Kobi…

    I wonder if Maldonado is another guy who may mature into a great, assuming he doesn’t get tossed out in the meantime

  60. Martin says:

    I agree with McNish and Herbert, racing incident.

  61. IgMi says:

    We would probably benefit from the understanding of the relevant sporting regulations here. First to understand what powers stewards have to impose penalties, and second to understand what they actually mean. When talking about reprimands if they are just a slap on the wrist I find it to be quite mild penalty having in mind the overall Maldonaldo’s driving style. If they are a sort of probation and a warning that you have to change your approach or next one is suspension, then this one would be appropriate. Judging from Maldonaldo’s analysis of the incidents he had been involved, he is also quite unbalanced in determining whose fault is it. We are all understandably unobjective when talking about ourselves, but in his case that is quite extreme. I am not sure at what point FIA may think that either a quiet chat with Maldonaldo may help, or something else is needed that would have some effect on his approach to sharing the race track. Talking about monetary fines they are kind’a easy to understand, although in the world where millions of dollars are in the play 10K or even 25K euros are not much. That being said, I find it to be quite unfair to fine Kobayashi 25K for his error (which he admited right away as his mistake and for which he appologized to the team and which was, to a degree, an internal team’s affair) and 10K for Maldonaldo’s overzealous (pardon me for the strong word, but it feels appropriate) defensive move that put one other driver out of GP and ultimately caused a monetary damage to another team.

    1. IgMi says:

      Forgot to add that I believe that a reprimand should also carry an automatic grid penalty for the next race (or next few races – open to the debate) and a relatively hefty financial penalty as well (10K does not fall into that category, really).

  62. Steve W says:

    I think the suspended ban should be reintroduced for repeat offenders. I remember hakkinen getting punished with this a few years back, and took a ban after a further incident. He learnt his lesson and returned a better driver. I feel similar treatment would be beneficial for maldonado as he has great speed, but his judgement in wheel to wheel battles is appalling. We had a chilling reminder this week that f1 cars are dangerous, therefore reckless driving should not be tolerated.

  63. Ostia says:

    Kobayashi clearly needed to be punished, and the punishment seems fair. This time, I’m not sure Maldonado’s offence was worse than Kobayashi’s.

    Maldonado’s penalty was interesting. Perhaps they didn’t want to penalise Williams ;-)

  64. chisel68 says:

    Why didn’t Perez go wider? MAL had to in Valencia to avoid the clash with HAM? MAL Valencia penalty was because after being run off the track to AVOID HAM he clumsily re-joined, beached on the kerb and lost steering (you can see in the replay he tried to steer away from HAM) and clouted him.

    Today, both on cold tyres and Perez tried to drive around the OUTSIDE of MAL at Brooklands? Racing incident.

    1. Matt Devenish says:

      My goodness, from most of these comments you’d be forgiven for thinking Maldonado had pulled a gun on Perez.

      I agree there are previous incidents involving Maldonado that the stewards have handled pretty badly (Monaco ’12 being the primary one, after what happened in Spa ’11), but today was simply a racing incident – two drivers going at it, neither wanting to yield and unfortunately they touched. But the term racing incident seems to have been lost since the arrival of “driver stewards”. It’s almost as if some shifty lawyer-types have taken over race control – where there’s a blame, there’s a claim.

      Officiating and penalties have quite frankly gone from bad to worse. Bad in the old days when everything was decided behind closed doors, to worse because consistency and fairness appear to have gone out the window.

      As a side thought, if PDVSA were to withdraw Maldonado’s funding for next year, does anyone think he’d find a drive elsewhere in F1 without sponsorship? Personally I think he should keep the drive at Williams, but somehow I think he’d struggle given his reputation and inconsistency. I hope he can turn his image around.

      1. Thompson says:

        Matt Devenish, you really need to look at this sport, people can get and have been killed in this sport!

        Maldanado t-boned hamilton after comming back onto the track, getting air born over the kurb, consider a few inches more and you could have had an accident far far more serious.

        Ramming another car – not during heated racing but while another drivers focus is on a cool down lap, consider.

        This guy is dangerous – he needs to be removed, maybe in a couple years time give him another chance if he has not imploded completely- but he needs to be removed.

      2. Matt Devenish says:

        My original reply clearly acknowledges the Spa and Monaco incidents and the leniency shown by the FIA, but those cases, just as the accidents he was involved in during his World Series by Renault days, bear no relation to either the Valencia or Silverstone crashes.

        The assertion Maldonado is dangerous to the point of deliberately killing others is ridiculous. Look at it subjectively. He is a GP2 champion and a Grand Prix winner. After his win in Barcelona he stated quite clearly his goal was to fight for the championship. He’s a hungry young driver, pushing as hard as he can, arguably too hard. He’s been involved in four accidents (ignoring practice) that I can recollect this year; Australia where he crashed out while pushing to pass Alonso, Monaco qualifying with Perez, Valencia crash with Hamilton and now the Silverstone crash with Perez. Apart from the Monaco clash which I agree was uncalled for and should have been dealt with more severely than the 10-place grid penalty he received, I don’t see that he’s done anything worse than someone like Hamilton, who crashed quite regularly with other drivers in 2011, to warrant such outcry for bans and the such like.

      3. Thompson says:

        This may well sound like bias but hamilton and Maldanado cannot be compared not even a little bit – ignore practice?

        The guy is dangerous.

  65. Rob says:

    My first knee jerk reaction was – Maldonaldo is over the top. But on reflection, maybe some of the racers he is racing should back off rather than hold the line. If you think they should hold the line rather than back off, because they are racers, then why shouldnt Maldonaldo ?

    Perhaps Maldonaldo is fiery and exciting to watch the same as Senna, Schumi, Hamilton etc. Racing is all about politics, agression, etc. All part of the fabric of the sport. Do we really all want racers that are afraid to make contact or make dangerous overtaking moves?

    I dont. Race and battle it out. Dont be afraid. Thats why they get paid so much. Comments like, we could get hurt ? Would a fire fighter say that Perez ?

    1. Jay West says:

      Agreed Rob. Well stated.

  66. Dietcliff says:

    I dont understand the KOB penalty but MAL needs to start being hit with serious ones. He is the single most dangerous driver in F1. He is the only driver in F1 that I have seen purposefully drive into others.

    1. matski says:

      *ahem*

      Schumacher took out Hill to win the championship in 1994, then tried it again against Villeneuve in 1997 but that time took himself out…

      1. Dietcliff says:

        Ok. I should have added in this generation of drivers. I like to think we’ve moved past that for the most part. Though the one difference I will add is that Shcumacher and Ayrton both did to fight for championships, MAL just seems to do it because he can.

  67. Paul Kirk says:

    Kobiashi’s was an acident whereas Maldonado’s seemed almost on purpose had he wanted to, could have avoided hitting Perez, I therefore feel Kobi should have recieved a lesser fine than Molly, also Molly should be on probation till the end of the season! He’s GOT to tidy up his act!
    PK.

  68. Andrew says:

    Maldonado has no respect at all for other drivers, treats f1 as though it’s a go kart race. He needs to be penalized severely, banned from a race or two. The stewards can’t keep looking at each incident in isolation, they should start looking at the overall pattern of incidents…

  69. Billy says:

    Modern day Formula One driving etiquette leaves a lot to be desired.

    In the end of the day, the sign of a good racer, races, without taking each other out.

  70. A.Green says:

    Maldonado drives for real like I do on a simulator ;)
    I can take crazy risks, brake late and knock others off, it won’t hurt,cost anything and I can reset when it goes wrong and start again.
    In the real world you can’t and Maldonado doesn’t seem to realise it (yet.

  71. Richardd says:

    The stewards are very inconsistent…

  72. Seán Craddock says:

    James you said Maldonado only got a €10,000 fine. But f1.com reports that he got fined €25,000 AND got a reprimand?

    It also states that Kobayashi’s fine is only €10,000 not the €25,000 you stated. Can you confirm which is true because I definitely think Maldonado needs more than a €10,000 fine

    1. James Allen says:

      They have it wrong

  73. Lanza81 says:

    James,

    Formula1.com has Maldonado’s retirement in Bahrain down due to a “Punchure”. Was this caused from a tangle with another driver?
    If so I have him having 5 accidents from 9 racers so far this year.
    Surely that has to say something for his driving style.

  74. Tornillo Amarillo says:

    Drivers fined is a joke for the fans, because is not a financial issue, maybe you can plan your fines if a dirty move is worthy?

    IMO for the fan a SPORT penalty should be given, a 10 grid penalty for Maldonado (plus the fine why not), or just to put him in the back of the grid next GP from now on (as a recurrent offender).

  75. SD says:

    Maldonado should be given a race ban, he has done this kind of thing too many times now and the message needs to be sent out that his standard of driving is unacceptable and bordering on the dangerous.

    I think a more clear and transparent system needs to be brought in when it comes to penalties in order so that they can be be applied consistently. Something like this maybe?

    1st offence – Fine and reprimand
    2nd offence – 5 place grid penalty
    3rd offence – Back of the grid
    4th offence – Race ban

  76. Jonno says:

    As a punishment for this race, a diddy penalty may be fair enough, Maldonado was just a bit clumsy really … however he has twice previously swiped other cars maliciously (v Hamilton at Spa and Perez this year in Monaco) – both of those situations should have resulted in at least a one race ban at the time, they were disgusting pieces of driving. Both of those were in non-racing scenarios, and both severely under punished at the time.

    Unfortunately he’s now won a race (surely the worst driver ever to join the exclusive grand prix winners club?), and may think he’s untouchable, and he needs someone to be tough with him, teach him a bit of respect before he hurts someone.

    Remember – Schumacher once got DQed for an entire championship for deliberately driving into someone. And I’d argue Maldonado’s swipes on Perez and Hamilton are worse than Schumacher on Villeneuve in 1997 because they were in non racing situations, clearly deliberate nasty petty little acts from someone with no respect for his peers.

  77. madmax says:

    10,000 euro, That doesn’t even mean anything. If he was in the wrong punish him and if he wasn’t don’t but this 10k fine is a joke.

  78. JB says:

    Does Maldonado have some sort of under-table connections? He seems to be virtually immune to horrible driving and a clear lack of respect to others on the track.
    Hamilton had gotten a lot of trouble with penalties last year for lesser ‘wrong doings’. This year Maldonado had troubles in Monaco, Valencia and now Silverstone. He is the bully of the F1 sport.

  79. John says:

    Maldonado – How can someone with the class of Frank Williams employ someone with no class and no respect?

    Kobayashi – The fine makes no sense at all. In this age of sub 3 sec pit stops, are we really that surprised that drivers will drive to the limit into their pit box? I think his conscience is sufficient to ensure he leaves a bit more margin the next time he drives into his pit box.

    1. HFEVO2 says:

      Eddie Jordan made a very valid point about the Kobayashi incident.

      The especially narrow layout of the Sauber pit box makes it impossible for the mechanics to move out of the way in incidents like this. Had they had more room, nobody might have been injured.

      I feel sorry that their driver was fined so much because he was obviously very upset to have caused the injuries.

      On the other hand Maldonado accepted no blame at all and received a much smaller fine.

    2. JK says:

      Well put. Your post is the only one that mentions the fact that every tenth saved helps towards race results.KOB mistake only hurt his race, and no one elses was compromised.
      If some kind of stop is not put to MAL type accidents, lines would soon become blurred..

      Just imagine a situation where Felipe collides with Vettel or Hamilton on his outlap and takes out Alonso’s rival on track, intentionally, cleverly disguised as lack of grip due to cold tyres…All you get is a slap on the wrist…

  80. [MISTER] says:

    Hi James!
    I think we all can agree from the comments above that PM has not been punished enough. That’s our opinion, the fans, which is quite different from the one the stewards had.
    I’m not sure if you can answer this question, but as an F1 fan (not a commentator or a journalist) what do you think of PM’s racing? Most importantly, is he learning from all these incidents?

    I am asking because I don’t think he does. Even in Valencia, he did not apologised for taking LH out. Now at Silverstone the same, he seems to think that he did nothing wrong.
    What’s your take on this? Thanks.

    1. James Allen says:

      It happens too often, clearly

    2. Peter C says:

      Careful, asking questions like that.

      James might have to interview him soon!

    3. Davexxx says:

      Yes I don’t see many comments from James in this posting! It’s not a criticism, it’s just hard for James to remain the neutral ‘impartial journalist’ here!

  81. Arya says:

    Didn’t we already know about Pastor during his GP2 years? I am sorry to say, these incidents reflect very poorly on Williams’ driver choice as well. Yes, he has won a Grand Prix for them, but that doesn’t take away anything from the fact that he is one of the most irresponsible characters to have ever graced(Or disgraced?) an F1 cockpit. A guy who thinks every corner is the last corner and often gets into act of road rage should not have been driving in F1.

    I just wonder if Maldonado would have done something as idiotic to a character like Senna or Montoya, what would have happened? :P

  82. Matthew Cheshire says:

    Monetary fines make no sense in F1.

    If Alonso was fined 10,000Euro it would be equivalent to an average earner in the UK paying 15 pounds! That isn’t a parking fine!

    It costs Sauber millions to get Perez on the track.

    I hope Maldonardo doesn’t earn a fraction of Alonso’s wage because he isn’t worth it. At this point he’s a fat loss to F1.

    Kobiyashi seemed distraught at causing his accident. A fine to him is meaningless other than allocating the blame he has already taken.

    So what are these fines for? Where does it go? Surely even Bernie wouldn’t bother syphoning off that kind of small change.

    So Maldonard pays up his lunch money and still claims its just his swashbuckling style. F1 needs to make penalties that drivers care about.

    I’d vote for Maldonardo running the next race wearing a dunce cap. He’d remember that.

    Where is your cartoonist James?

    1. James Allen says:

      Still looking for one!

      1. David Perel says:

        James I know a cartoonist who’s done some work for my company in the past. If you’d like me to put you in touch please let me know.

        Or you can get hold of him directly: http://twitter.com/bradcolbow

  83. Seong says:

    The guy paid 40m for his seat. He has to drive. Money talks.

  84. Husker says:

    According to formula1.com, Maldonado got the 25K and Kobayashi 10K.
    http://www.formula1.com/news/headlines/2012/7/13566.html
    .
    Now, I still think 25K is letting him go easy. When a driver gets SIX penalties in a 9-race period, HE is the problem. That’s not agression, that’s disrespect and sheer stupidity on his part.
    .
    Has the FIA forgotten the move he pulled on Hamilton at Spa last year? For that alone he should have been banned for at least a race! I don’t think anyone believes his explanation about what happened in Monaco. He always tries to play the victim and fills his explanations with excuses but after all the facts, I truly believe he should get AT LEAST a one-race ban but 2 would be best for everyone, him included.

    I hope I’m wrong, but I feel this guy is going to eventually end up hurting someone if he’s not stopped once and for all from this kind of driving.

    1. James Allen says:

      They have it the wrong way around

  85. Panayiotis says:

    Meaningless fines… Does the FIA NOT read the fans’ comments or take any feedback into account??? This inconsistency is truly (not Trulli:)!) hurting F1…

  86. Craig in Manila says:

    Fines should not be a part of the penalties.
    The driver/team just pays it and that’s that.

    For dangerous/reckless driving, penalty should be loss of DRS&KERS for next race/s as it’ll mean that other drivers can avoid any aggro by simply driving by on the straights.

    It should also be mandatory that all overtaking drivers give him a little wave as they drive past.

  87. mansell says:

    It is completely different with this guy. He does not respect any other road user. See below for proof that this guy shouldnt be in a racecar period

    Racing in the Renault World Series in 2005, the then 25-year-old ignored yellow flags before striking and severely injuring a marshal.

    Organisers of the Monaco grand prix reacted by banning Maldonado from the street circuit for life.

    Germany’s Bild revealed that Maldonado’s wealthy father intervened, promising to pay for the marshal’s recovery and rehabilitation from a broken back.

    The guy is a complete liability and should be banned

  88. AlexD says:

    Oil talks…..

  89. James McNulty says:

    I would love to know what Maldonado was like as a little kid, I bet he has no concept of sharing. I bet at school sports day he would trip up his opponents in the sprint if he was loosing!

    Maldanado needs to accept there will be some instances when he will get overtaken. There are some fights you cannot win. Sometimes you have to yield. I clever driver would realise this. Looks at Alonso being overtaken on Sunday by Webber, they both survived!

    If Maldonado was in Alonso’s place he would rather have taken both himself and Webber out rather than loose the lead.

    Maldonado has no respect for his fellow drivers, he comes across extremely arrogant in my view.

    If he is to continue with his Napoleonic arrogance I hope he starts receiving his comeuppance and doesn’t hurt anyone in the process!

  90. renato nysan says:

    One would think repeatingly scoring no points/DNFs would be enough for somebody intelligent to learn.

  91. HFEVO2 says:

    Given his history of unacceptable incidents, I would have given Maldonado a one race ban after Valencia with a warning that a three race ban would follow for any further transgressions.

    Obviously Perez must be wishing Maldonado had missed Silverstone but an incident like this latest one with Sergio would now bring the three race ban into effect.

    Williams have some serious decisions to make about their driver line up for 2013.

    Maldonado brings a lot of money to the team but his behaviour on track is doing nothing for the image of the team or that of Venezuela.

    On the other hand, Sir Frank has so much experience with drivers it must be possible for him to sort the problem out.

    As for Senna, there is plenty of talk about driver changes for 2013 but nobody is mentioning Senna.

    Despite some improvement in recent form, he is not really delivering for the team.

    With a much more competitive car, it looks like Sir Frank could attract and benefit from having at least one quick, experienced driver.

    I can’t see Di Resta leaving Force India for Williams but if Ferrari does go ahead and drop Massa, surely he has to be in the frame for a Williams seat ?

    Let’s not forget that with a good pilot like Glock wasting his skills at the back of the field and Heidfeld and Sutil without drives at all, there are no shortage of other options.

    With hindsight, why on earth did they take Senna rather than keep Rubens ?

    1. Peter C says:

      Perhaps there is something explosive about South Americans??

  92. HowardHughes says:

    Am I the only person to notice that Maldonado is actually the spirit of Tazio Nuvolari reincarnate?

    http://www.cma43.com/informazioni_appunti/Tazio_nuvolari_biografia/tazio_nuvolari_2.png

  93. This is the Pastor Maldonado I was always expecting to see in F1, right back from when I first became aware of him through the World Series by Renault and his Minardi test. He’s always been quick enough for Formula 1 – you don’t drive Monaco as well as he does without being good – but his hot-headedness has always been apparent, too.

    None of the accidents he has been involved with have been particularly bad, but they’ve all been badly conceived, clumsily executed and would basically have required the other driver to jump right out of his way. For Pastor, the red mist seems to descend when he closed up on another car and he has to learn to take a step back, look at the long view and plan where, when and how to make his move.

    With that in mind, I don’t think he’s going to learn very much from a fine that melts into insignificance given the size of his financial backing. Personally, I would’ve liked to see him given a suspended one race ban. That certainly would give him pause for thought next time he’s sizing up an overtake.

    For Kobayashi’s incident in the pits, I’m really not sure what the stewards think a fine will achieve. Hitting your pitbox on worn and unpredictable tyres is tricky and Kamui will need to take that into account in future. Knocking down three team members will drive that home far more effectively than a fine ever could, so I don’t see the point in giving him anything more than a reprimand. In this instance, the crime was punishment enough.

  94. surya kumar says:

    It seems that Pastor Maldanado is acting like a spoilt child “”This is my line”” you are not to overtake me!!.

    P.S: James one question related to the fines, to whom does the fine amount go to, is it the FIA or the FOM and how to they use this fine money?. Also what compromise is given to the victims?.Assuming sauber is fighting for 6th in the WCC where williams is already there, and since they dont want sauber to get the position can they just ask P.M to cause these types of Problems?. Also assuming that the 6th Place will get a few millions more and a 12K USD is nothing.

  95. Sossoliso says:

    I envisage a time in the very near future when we are going to hear the following message over a driver radio:

    Race Engineer(Re): “..He is behind you..”
    Driver: “Where?”
    RE: “Behind you”
    Driver: “Can’t See him”
    Re: “Go Left , get out of the way, go”
    Driver: “ooops, too late”

    1. timW says:

      while watching the (I think) 2006 season round up on Sky recently I was surprised to hear a very similar conversation between Takuma Sato and his race engineer at the start of a GP. Taku’s engineer was saying “car to your left, move right” and so on!

  96. Jon Wilde says:

    Within the current regulations does the punishment of race ban still exist?

    A financial punishment to teams or drivers, irrespective of value has no impact on the fans. A punishment for impacting “the show” should be something that influences “the show”

    I’m no fan of Pastor, but recognise his place in F1. He is aggressive, but so are other drivers. He is just simply another element teams and drivers must cope with on track.

    I saw an article over the weekend in which the FIA stated that both Lewis and Fernando could have been disqualified from Valencia / Canada for rule infringements. they escaped penalty because the other teams did not protest. This is crazy. If a driver breaks a rule they should be punished. Yes some of the rules are stupid. (like not being allowed to pick up a flag) but only when the rule is enforced will it be reviewed and modified. For example Montréal 2011 lead to a maximum run time for a race, I have no doubt Silverstone 2012 qualifying will lead to a new rule on qualifying delays.

    The penalty system desperately needs an overhaul.

  97. Rafael says:

    Looks like that sole win went to his head – thinking he’s a lot better than he (currently) actually is. He’s becoming a 2010s version of Juan Pablo Montoya… albeit a lot less lkeable.

  98. Don says:

    I do agree with Kamui’s penalty, being aggressive in the pit lane or pit box it up to the mechanics not the driver.

    It seems that ever since the introduction of driver stewards there has been very little consistency in regards to penalties. I thought the driver steward was only there to give a drivers view of what the driver was thinking, seeing or trying to accomplish at the time of an infraction and nothing else.

    Do the driver stewards really have any power in the decisions that are made?

    What ever happened to the days when a penalty had real meaning, 10 second stop and go or a race ban or even a points taken away (ie. Shummi 1997)?

  99. Paul says:

    During yesterday’s race it was good to see the quality of some drivers, overtaking or faced with being overtaken, giving a little respect to the other party involved and both coming out of it with bodywork and integrity intact…and then we have Crash Bandicoot Maldonado, whose judgement seems questionable at the best of times, wrecking innocent drivers’ races…he puts himself in that position on the track, not the other driver, and it’s about time they decided what they want, decent racing or wreckless driving…

  100. Sebastiaan says:

    Maldonado is agressive, on and off track. After the race he was interviewed by Fox Sport Latin (Buenos Aires) and simply denied any responsibility. He added that “Perez reacts always so aggressive, he is just like that. Too aggressive.”
    Says a lot about the thinking of señor Pastor Maldonado. Even off track he cannot deal with others without crashing into them.

  101. Carlos Marques says:

    Driver fines should be a % of their salary + sponsorship money. This latest incident should have cost Maldonado (and Williams) 10% of his salary. Keep crashing and the % goes up to 20 and 25% in subsequent fines. That will make him think twice, or it will make Williams think twice…

  102. CarlH says:

    ‘Meanwhile the stewards fined Kamui Kobayashi €25,000 for driving into his own pit crew, because it was a very dangerous manoeuvre which had potentially serious implications.’

    The world has gone mad.

    It’s not like he suddenly decided to wipe out his entire pit crew in a fit of rage is it? He made a mistake, unlike Maldonado who has twice purposely rammed drivers on track, at speed, just because he was annoyed.

    Unbelievable…..

  103. SK Anand says:

    there must be consistency in terms of rules being implemented and rules being interpreted. Michael got a grid penalty of 5 places.

  104. zx6dude says:

    I admit, I’m completely biased on this. There have been some F1 drivers I’ve liked, some I admired, some I didn’t like and there has only ever been one F1 driver I have no respect for: Maldonado. It sounds like the incident at Silverstone was more of a racing incident than anything else, however looking at Maldonado’s (or Maldonado’h) history, he is reckless, dangerous, unapologetic and completely unsporting. As far as I’m concerned he should not be in F1. It takes more than being quick to be a F1 driver. Let’s not forget that he was banned for “life” in Monaco. Money talks so loud.

  105. Alysha says:

    It is incredible how in two months Maldonado wasted all the social capital and goodwill he gained from the “fell good” Williams victory.

    Then again, Williams showed with Hulkenberg how little such things matter to the team. Were it not for PDVSA money…

  106. David Ryan says:

    Has to be said, there is something slightly disproportionate in the calls for Maldonado to be banned as a result of one of the least dangerous incident he’s been involved in. The BBC team were unanimous in calling it a racing incident, and while I can’t speak for Sky (not a subscriber) I would imagine they viewed it the same way. Calls for him to be punished simply because of previous incidents unrelated to the race in question smacks somewhat of subjective justice – it’s a generally accepted principle that a person is held to account for their conduct, not their reputation, and the same should apply here.

    If taking previous incidents into account is a desired outcome, however, may I suggest the FIA does so by reintroducing penalty points onto the licence? Most of the British championships have such a provision and under the totting-up process automatic race bans kick in once the limit (12) is reached. It would certainly make drivers think more about their conduct, and given it would require a much more comprehensive set of regulations in terms of how to apply penalties we may well also end up with a more consistent system.

  107. Lawrence says:

    Wow 213 comments, PM gets under people’s skins! The penalty on KK was harsh, a reprimand was all that was necessary. I think PM was lucky not to be penalised more harshly for the collision he was involved in with SP in Monaco. As for Sunday’s crash I think the penalty was fair, if SP’ car had been half a length a head at the point of impact that would have looked really bad for PM. The penalty he got at the European GP was also fair, it was near the end of the race he made a good move but chose to go wide, he did not have to go off the track. When he was coming back on to it he should have done so with greater care. It was a heated exchange between PM and LH but the crash was PM’s fault but it did not warrant a more severe punishment. The argument that LH should have conceded is ridiculous. There were two laps to go he had to all he could within the rules to keep him behind, which he did. The car-banging PM did in Belgium last year was bad and deserved to be punished more severely than the five grid place penalty he got for that. He will have to wise up a bit. He reminds me a bit like LH last year, there the comparison ends. LH was F1 champion in 2008 and has won many races. I hope PM learns to calm down a bit.

  108. T Nelan Esq says:

    Hugo Chavez and Pastor Maldanado:
    One is an unhinged South American who dishes out swift and cruel justice to crush all potential threats to their dominant position… and the other is the President of Venezuela!

    1. KGBVD says:

      An both have the support of the majority of Venezuelans!

  109. Christopher.Wagar says:

    I’m not sure why everyone is so upset with Maldonado. Just yesterday I was playing Gran Turismo, bouncing off of cars going around me on the outside. It’s a great manoeuvre. I ended up taking 1st at Suzuka. Try as I may, I couldn’t take out my pit crew though.

    Okay, don’t slag me…. just taking the piss :p

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