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Posted on April 4, 2012
Adrian Newey - Red Bull Racing image

Adrian Newey, Formula 1’s foremost designer of the past two decades, was recognised on a national scale this week when he collected his OBE from the Queen at Windsor Castle.

Red Bull Racing’s chief technical officer was recognised for his services to motorsport during a career that has seen him design multiple championship-winning cars for Williams, McLaren and now his current team. Newey had been honoured in the same New Years Honours List as Nigel Mansell – who took the designer’s Williams FW14B to the 1992 drivers’ title – the 31-time grand prix winner having received a CBE for his role as president of the young people’s charity UK Youth. The 58-year-old joined current F1 team owners Ron Dennis, Tony Fernandes and Sir Frank Williams in having received that particular honour.

Newey hasn’t been the only key Red Bull figure picking up an award, however, as world champion Sebastian Vettel was in Paris to collect a prestigious prize from the French Academy of Sports for the most outstanding sporting achievement of 2011. Awards to the best sports people in France and beyond have been handed out by the body since 1911 and past F1 winners have included Juan Manuel Fangio (1957), Jim Clark (1965), Jackie Stewart (1973), Niki Lauda (1977), Alain Prost (1989) and Michael Schumacher (2001). FIA president Jean Todt was also in attendance at Monday’s ceremony

During his appearance in France, Vettel also spoke for the first time in public since his outburst against Narain Karthikeyan at Sepang in the aftermath of the puncture that dropped him out of fourth place late on. Although his use of the word ‘idiot’ in relation to the HRT driver in his post-race interview with the BBC prompted a wave of headlines, which were followed by ones for Karthikeyan’s forthright response, Vettel believes he has nothing to regret.

“To lose a solid fourth place in the points, that is naturally disappointing,” he was quoted as saying by Sport Bild. “Sometimes you let the emotion show and I don’t think someone should be ashamed about that. This is part of the sport.” Vettel’s outburst was unsurprisingly played down by his team principal Christian Horner in recent days, with the world champion team’s overrding concern in the break between races undoubtedly working out how to get more performance out of the RB8 for China, particularly in the team’s previous stronghold of qualifying.

Red Bull duo collect awards, as Vettel sticks to his guns
117 Responses

  1.   1. Posted By: Tom in adelaide
        Date: April 4th, 2012 @ 10:50 pm 

    Red Bull are lucky they have Mark Webber there to offset some of the less likeable personalities in the team.

    [Reply]

    JackFlash Reply:

    Redbull are lucky to have Mark Webber for so many reasons… full stop.

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    Wayne Reply:

    This statement is even truer than you know. There is very little to like about this team other than Mark Webber. They are (in my opinion) hypocritical, arrogant, duplicitous and totally at odds with RedBull’s global marketing strategy. The media spent the entirity of last year raving on about SV’s calm, down to earth nature – it’s no challenge to be in a good mood when literally everything is going your way. I find it remarkable that SV did not have the decency to apologise to NK for the personal insults he slung his way during and after the race.

    I sincerely hope that either Ferrari, Mercedes or McLaren put these people firmly back in their box before long. Oh, and now that Parr has left Williams, I would not mind seeing them return fully to form either – wouldn;t it be amazing to see Frank retire on the back of a WDC!

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    BobD Reply:

    Oh my.

    I find Webber and Marko the less likeable personalities on the team. Webber’s antics in 2010 turned me off.

    But then I’m an American, not an Aussie.

    [Reply]

    Lezza Reply:

    Would you mind going into more detail?

    [Reply]


  2.   2. Posted By: goferet
        Date: April 4th, 2012 @ 11:06 pm 

    Uh, Newey’s OBE was way overdue matter of fact, considering his achievements and contributions, one would have thought he should have been knighted already and me thinks, Sir Adrian Newey has a particular nice ring to it.

    Anyway well done to him and in my view, he has to be the greatest designer ever simply for the fact that he has been able to produce amazing pieces of machinery for 3 different teams (and over a long period of time), something no other designer can boost of.

    But I have to admit, Newey’s retirement (for good this time) can’t come soon enough for his cars have produced some of the most slum dunk/boring seasons in the history of motorsport —> Which is never good for us real thoroughbred racers.

    As for Vettel, for sure 2011 was a big year for him seeing as he’s still receiving awards up to this day —> well into 2012.

    But I have to say, am a bit puzzled by this most outstanding sporting achievement, it appears it’s not handed out every year judging from the gaps in previous winners and from the looks of it, they have left out a number of drivers that had pretty outstanding years e.g. Senna’s 1988 season.

    Now, I must be one of the few that was glad Vettel didn’t apologize for his reaction in Malaysia for I one am fed up with everything to do with PC, we want to see real passion from drivers and even though what they may do may not be pleasing to the self righteous, me, am willing to sweep such incidents under the carpet and moving on.

    So yes, keep up the good work Sebi, more of the same please for it’s not a pretty sight seeing former passionate drivers like Alonso & Hammy walking around on egg shells during their interviews & press conferences.

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  3.   3. Posted By: Merlinghnd
        Date: April 4th, 2012 @ 11:10 pm 

    Vettel is an admit nothing and apologise to no one sort of guy, completely opposite to Jenson Button who is very much a hands up it was my fault sort of guy.

    Will be interesting to see who comes out on top this year.

    I always liked Vettel but starting to think he is a little high maintenance for my liking.

    [Reply]

    Doohan Reply:

    Apart from Turkey when he cut across Mark. He’s been pretty good at admitting to mistakes on his behalf. Spa 2010 is a good example.

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    KRB Reply:

    Well, Spa 2010 what else could he do? It was clearly his fault. But how ’bout Hungary ’10, Brazil ’09, Australia ’09? Or questioning his team during the race at Canada ’10?

    Turkey ’10 was clearly his fault. As for Malaysia, he didn’t play it safe, cut it close, and suffered the consequences.

    As one poster said, it’s easy to be calm and measured when it’s all falling into your lap.

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    daphne Reply:

    He’s still a kid really – 24, whereas Button is 32. That makes a difference in how you react to certain situations; maturity and all that. Vettel handles himself well, for his age, I think. In the future he probably won’t be giving guys who aggrieve him the finger or calling them vegetable names. He’s learnt that lesson – very publically.

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    Don Farrell Reply:

    +1

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    wolf Reply:

    As one of my mates put it:
    “it was definitely Karthikayans fault.. he should have known that Vettel wanted to cut him off !!!”

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    Norman C Reply:

    I agree. I thought Vettel was amazing when he won his first race at Monza and that all got washed away when he banged into Mark Webber in Turkey 2012 and gestured that Mark was the crazy one.

    Respect level fell, and he is not helping his case.

    [Reply]

    Stephen Reply:

    I don’t think Vettel had anything to admit or apologise for. The F1 Show on Sky showed fairly clearly that Karthikeyan was at fault.

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    Mate, it doesn’t matter who was at fault, you just don’t insult the other drivers.
    Every race has incidents because someone makes a mistake..how many times did you see other drivers call names and be so rude to the ones at fault?

    Did you see anyone going to Liuzi and call him names when he took 2 or 3 cars in the first corner at one of the races last year?

    [Reply]

    Stephen Reply:

    Oh yeah, I forgot that a Formula 1 driver’s job description includes being nice to everybody and never being rude.

    Neil Pinkerton Reply:

    Vettel clearly is a great driver, but he should show some humility. Karthikeyan has 2 things to think about, racing forwards and watching out for faster cars, he has to have eyes in the back of his head. Vettel has only one job, fight to the front.

    Neil Pinkerton Reply:

    I have to say this though, at the same time Vettel has to show he is hard. Thats the nature of the sport to an extent.

    Wayne Reply:

    You dont thin he should apologise for slinging insults and gestures at a colleague? If I did that at work i’d be dismissed.

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    Stephen Reply:

    You can’t really compare sport to your own job. If I rugby tackled a work colleague I’d be done for assault. He called somebody an idiot, the way people are reacting you’d think he had beaten the guy up. I’d rather see Vettel stick to his guns than issue a wishy washy apology written by Red Bull PR.

    Wayne Reply:

    Stephen, I don’t subscribe to the idea that some people are excused common courtesy and decency because of their celebrity or job status.

    Wayne Reply:

    “Oh yeah, I forgot that a Formula 1 driver’s job description includes being nice to everybody and never being rude.”

    Stephen, seriously, what are you talking about? That’s every member of the human race’s job description. Sometimes I despair for us all….

    [Reply]

    Lezza Reply:

    Quite frankly, this debate is a bit of a yawn.
    Vettel got annoyed, shot off at the mouth and copped some flak.
    So what?
    I call it part of the great game that’s F1.
    I’m not interested in a sanitised sport – I want colour and drama, and if along the way, there’s human controversy, more of it I say.
    Now a teeny, weeny little point to rattle the Seb lovers.
    Would their hero have been game to insult someone with the temperament of a Brabham, Hunt, Mansell, or Jones?
    They’ve have thumped him, had they been able to drag him out from behind Marko’s skirts.
    Oohwah.

    [Reply]

    John Reply:

    What you describe is a hint of the old Senna, isn’t it?

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    Merlinghnd Reply:

    Forgot to add, congratulations to Adrian Newey, surely the outstanding person in F1 of recent years. I am sure he is the only person that every team would want to have onboard in F1 if they could.

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    Wallers Reply:

    The difference being that it was Button’s fault he hit the HRT. Whereas it wasn’t Vettel’s fault, the HRT moved over, also if watch the incident Karthikeyan was looking in his left hand mirror.

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    James Allen Reply:

    I agree with this view 100% and so did the stewards!

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    Paul from Green Bay Reply:

    Yes, yes, yes!! This has been driving me nuts since the incident when so many people chose to believe their prejudices against Vettel rather than their lying eyes. If a back marker ignores a blue flag and slows a racer down, he deserves a fist shaking. When a slowpoke can’t be bothered to clear his maneuver and turns into you, cutting your tire and destroying your race what does he deserve then? Vettel has been a relative gentleman.

    Did Karthikeyan even apologize? He deserved a full race penalty.

    Wayne Reply:

    With (real) respect, James, you very rarely, if ever, agree with a comment that questions SV. This is implicit in many articles throught last year.

    James Allen Reply:

    No, I see a lot of negativity towards him from people who have never met him and just don’t like him from afar, therefore assume that everything he does is wrong.

    If he screws up I’ll be the first to say so.

    Wayne Reply:

    “No, I see a lot of negativity towards him from people who have never met him and just don’t like him from afar, therefore assume that everything he does is wrong.

    If he screws up I’ll be the first to say so.”

    I can see that, James – but all we can do with these guys is like/dislike, respect/disrespect them from afar. I suppose we are lucky to have an objective professional such as you to offer an opinion from much closer.

    James Allen Reply:

    Fair enough, but Vettel doesn’t deserve the pelters he gets. He’s not a controversial figure within F1. He has a lot of respect from within F1

    Wayne Reply:

    Whose fault it was is no longer the point. The stewards decided that NK was at fault so that is that. THIS DOES NOT excuse SV’s spoilt brat behavior and childish, ignorant and rude name calling episode that went on for days after the event. Long after the ‘heat of the moment’ had cooled. Niether does it excuse team principals’ blind support of their drivers regardless of their behavior.

    [Reply]

    Nathan Jones Reply:

    James. You’re very quick to defend SV with regards to him getting a bad rap from those who don’t know him (well, 99.9999% of fans don’t know him), you defend also the fact that NK was to blame rather than SV for the incident. Do you have a view on the [repeated] obscene gesture, the name calling and the complete lack of contrition? You don’t think these actions would constitute something which would fall into that “screwing up” category that you mention? Something which you should be calling him out for?

    As far as negativity goes, I’d imagine there is a helluva lot more of it towards Lewis Hamilton than there is towards Sebastian. Yep, he does warrant a fair amount of it, but surely nowhere all of it; and I recall few incidents where you have seen fit to step in to defend his honour. Not worthy of it?

    James Allen Reply:

    He shouldn’t have done it, of course. I’m sure he knows that.

    Chris Reply:

    In general most of them are quick to blame anyone but themselves, JB included, it comes with the mentality needed to compete at that level.

    Jenson took responsibility for his accident with Narain because it was 100% his fault, it was entirely clear cut and everyone on the face of the earth could see it. However, in an incident where both drivers share some of the blame Jenson is just as unlikely as the rest of them to take any responsibility. Off the top of my head his two incidents in Canada last year are great examples of this.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m a Mclaren and JB fan, but he’s really not much better than any other driver at being objective about incidents…. because ultimately he’s human.

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    Nathan Jones Reply:

    Well said. I don’t understand why people are lauding Jenson Button to the heavens for his admission of guilt. It was pretty undeniable and he would have looked utterly ridiculous if he’d tried to spin it any other way. Not like he was doing anyone a favour. The media have taken him unto their bosom for this grand gesture though.

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  4.   4. Posted By: TG
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:06 am 

    Sounds like a young Schumacher.

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    zombie Reply:

    Young Schumacher gave no quarter and asked for none, but cetainly did not go around calling fellow drivers as “cucumbers” and “idiots”. He had more maturity despite being under immense pressure. Vettel should start behaving like a big boy now..

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    Spa 1998?

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    Wayne Reply:

    Didn’t he stroll down to Dc’s garage and try to actually pick a fight wiht the guy?

    [Reply]


  5.   5. Posted By: [MISTER]
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:13 am 

    Agree with Vettel that letting your emotions out is nothing to be ashamed of, but when you’ve been rude and calling someone names..there’s no shame in apologize.

    He would get more fans by putting his hands up and admit his bad behaviour. Anyone can be rude, but not all can admit it and apologize..as our champion has just proved.

    I don’t like him, I don’t think that will change soon.

    [Reply]

    Wayne Reply:

    Agreed, it is his refusal to issue an apology that really grates on my nerves.

    [Reply]


  6.   6. Posted By: Trent
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:42 am 

    I found Vettel’s comments are pretty unbecoming, to be honest.

    He took a risk by trying to grab more track space than was prudent or perhaps necessary. When it didn’t pay off, he not only tries to blame the other guy, but does so by calling him names.

    Vettl will always cop criticism because of his success, that is human nature. But this time he firmly deserves it.

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  7.   7. Posted By: Ben
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 1:06 am 

    As reigning WDC Vettel is a role model for other drivers and the leading ambassador for the sport. He should be setting a better example and apologise for the comments he made.

    Of course, when filled with adrenaline during the race and in the post race interviews it is natural drivers will make hand gestures or make insulting comments however if they do say or do something offensive once they have calmed down they should be mature enough to apologise for their conduct.

    Vettel is not the first to say or do things at the heat of the moment, for example Hamilton last year made comments about Massa and Maldanado after the Monaco Grand Prix. However Hamilton later apologised to both drivers for what he said. Even if Karthikeyan was 100% to blame for the incident Vettel’s comments would have been inappropriate, it is not professional for the reigning two times WDC to be calling other drivers on the grid by insulting names and then, instead of apologising, making excuses for his actions later on.

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    +1 agree.

    [Reply]

    Grayzee (Australia) Reply:

    + 1
    I wonder…had it been a different driver, say a midfield runner, would he have reacted the same way?

    [Reply]


  8.   8. Posted By: Steven
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 1:35 am 

    I remember last year when LH was cruzefied after he did the same thing when passing Kamui in Spa, he just cut it too soon and took himself out. But Lewis just said it was his fault, he didnt blame Kamui.

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    Justin Bieber Reply:

    Not even close to be the same thing..

    Karthikeyan moved back to where Vettel was. LH moved back to where Kamui was.

    [Reply]


  9.   9. Posted By: Ashwin
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 1:39 am 

    Thinking of which, last season we had a repeat of events with Lewis and Felipe on more than 5 separate events. They fought bitterly till the end.

    But this incident, has turned really sore. Vettel has already cracked under the mountain of pressure and expectation. He is ashamed to admit it. I mean, forget about the ego which is at stake, but he would have earned Brownie points had he just plainly said a simple sorry for it. Rather, he is going the Schumacher way which we are all familiar with.

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    But he wasn’t at fault here, Karthikeyan was…

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    So what James?
    How many incidents happened last year with someone at blame? Did we see any driver using such insults like Vettel?

    I feel you are a Vettel fan and kinda try to find excuses for his behaviour. That’s biased.
    Like a said above, when Liuzi caught the grass last year at the start of a GP and he took Rosberg and another 2 cars in the first corner..did you see any of those drivers taken out to go and insult Liuzi?

    I am very surprised to be honest by this comment you made. And dissapointed.

    If all the drivers would follow Vettels behaviour every time there’s an incident..what would F1 become? They’re professional drivers. Professional!

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    I wasn’t excusing the insult. I was saying that the collision wasn’t his fault, That’s a fact.

    You’ve been reading (and contributing to) this site long enough to know it’s unbiased. If you’ve not twigged that by now then it’s me who should be disappointed…

    [MISTER] Reply:

    James, I might’ve misundestood your comment, but I don’t think anyone is interested who was at fault. I don’t. No matter who was at fault..Seb should not be calling another driver an “idiot”. And even if he did in the heat of the moment (which is perfectly fine and I don’t condemn) he should know better and should be advised that he should act like a champion and apologize.

    I just don’t want F1 to become a bunch of fast drivers who exchange insults and even fists because of incidents on the track. That is their job and their work place.
    Like someone mentioned above, this kind of behaviour is not acceptable in most workplaces.

    I only picked up on your comment because it seemed to me that you were trying to take the blame (for calling another driver an idiot) off Vettel by saying he was not at fault.

    Stephen Reply:

    A lot of people seem to be missing this point, or ignoring it.

    [Reply]

    Nicky Santoro Reply:

    Not for the insults he isn’t… I think this is what really gets to people.

    And, do you totally place the blame of the accident on NK? I’d have thought that it comes out very differently from different camera angles and Vettel, with a WDC on the line, should have measured better (much better) the risks for the situation. It’s not like Sepang has narrow straights.

    [Reply]

    Arvin S Reply:

    Exactly! Vettel had acres of land on the right to stay clear of any possibility of an accident… NK had maybe a meter to adjust his car from slipping & sliding on his left!
    Any sane driver, esp a WDC, would know better. Remain right till absolute clear. It’s not that hard with RedBull’s pace to wait another 5 seconds. Or better still, wait behind till the middle of the straight to pass, not force the issue just around cornering!!

    Jay Reply:

    Check the replay- Vettel gave enough room, Narain lost control, which he admitted to and was subsequently punished for.

    Arvin S Reply:

    I think he means Vettel should have apologized for his post-race rant, not the incident itself, which in any case was an incident with both parties at some fault.

    Vettel didn’t need to stoop to street level of calling names and disrespecting fellow competitors! That’s just childish and indefensible in professional sports.

    [Reply]


  10.   10. Posted By: Kay
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 1:56 am 

    Vettel: SCREW YOU! YOU JUST LOST ME 4th!

    *The world goes crazy on him*

    Vettel: I was a little emotional, nothing wrong with that, ya? heh.

    What’s the logic in that?!?!?!? Jeez! Spoilt kids these days.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Well, perhaps there is equally little logic in the world going crazy?

    [Reply]

    Justin Bieber Reply:

    and then people complain that F1 drivers are like robots..

    [Reply]


  11.   11. Posted By: David
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 2:01 am 

    What is this so-called “British Empire”?

    [Reply]

    zombie Reply:

    Hangup of the colonial era. By the way, is there anyone left in Britain who hasn’t been awarded OBE yet ?

    [Reply]


  12.   12. Posted By: Arya
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 2:12 am 

    I see reports that RBR have sent their team manager to teams like Marussia and HRT to ask them to be extra cautious when they see a Red Bull car in their mirror, especially the one with 1 written on it :P . Dr. Marko has confirmed these reports.

    What a shame in the name of being the top team in F1!!!! They should go rallying where there will be no wheel to wheel action.

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    hahahaha +1

    [Reply]


  13.   13. Posted By: Mr Brooksy
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 4:10 am 

    Hi James,

    This situation between Vettel, RBR and Karthikayen seems to have really brought out anger from us fans ala Turkey 2010. There are (web) pages and pages of angry posts labelling Vettel and RBR as arrogant children, prima donas, whiners etc.

    Does RBR seriously think that their continued actions won’t effect their fan base? Or do teams no longer place their “fans” as an important part of their business considerations?

    [Reply]


  14.   14. Posted By: chisel68
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 8:39 am 

    I think the more pressing question at the moment is whether backmarkers should have to move over for frontrunners.

    Wave a blue flag at them so they know a frontrunner is there, sure. But why should backmarkers forgo their potential points/money to let someone else through who is obviously quicker and should have little trouble in getting past them anyway. They often potentially scupper their own chances at moving further up the grid that would come from a higher place finish by moving off the racing line, therefore having a slower lap which in turn brings more frontrunners to their gearbox!

    Reading both Vettel and Kartekeyans reports on teh incident, surely this situation highlights the fact that backmarkers are nervous about “where” they put their car so as not to interfere with front runners or crash themselves. However a frontrunner “competing” for the overtake means both will know where the other will likely be as its a ‘normal’ overtaking situation.

    In the grand scheme of things, if frontrunners get slowed down a bit, isn’t that promoting closer racing which is what we all want?

    For what its worth, Vettel is looking and sounding more arrogant. I dont likey…

    [Reply]

    Dick Goodey Reply:

    A sensible suggestion.
    Blue flag should just be to alert a driver he is about to be lapped by a faster car, not an order to pull over.
    This would improve the racing, and bunch up the field.
    Overtakes should be just that, not an ‘after you’ cop out.

    [Reply]


  15.   15. Posted By: Joe B
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 8:49 am 

    My opinion on his actual level of ability aside, well done on the award Seb, it’s always good for the sport to be recognised. I don’t think the awards show would really be the place for him to go into detail about the incident, or be properly criticized for his reaction; hopefully between two TV crews in China there will be one pundit brave enough to take him to task on it.

    Congratulations to Newey and Mansell as well, two fully deserving national sporting heroes.

    [Reply]


  16.   16. Posted By: Owen
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 9:03 am 

    Vettel’s behaviour was so different to Jenson’s gracious and sportsmanlike manner – a true gentleman he is at all times. Go Jenson! – and prove that “nice guys” can win …

    [Reply]


  17.   17. Posted By: Hugh in Derry
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 9:11 am 

    In a sport where tenths of a second mean everything, I believe Sebastian Vettel will get ample opportunity to reflect on his outburst and attitude – he will find himself staring at the back of an HRT 5 or 6 times a race for the rest of the season.

    Vettel’s wet-nurse needs to lay off the Red Bull for a while perhaps.

    [Reply]


  18.   18. Posted By: Roger roger
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 9:15 am 

    What a difference a few months makes !

    Red Bull no longer dominant, the new bright star acting like a spoiled child, crashing into a backmarker then continuing to try and blame the backmarker…. and Babyface Horner reduced from slyly downplaying his team’s utter dominance to making desperate protests in order to spy on his rivals superior technology.

    Red Bull and SV have shown their Ugly Face.

    Webber has shown how a driver can go from Chump to Champ, depending on the vagaries of the tyres and his driving style.

    [Reply]

    MookF1 Reply:

    I have got to think theres more to Webber being better this season than the tyres and driving style the tyres are still not meant to suit him compared to 2010 no?

    Maybe it’s all confidence and his has returned and obviously I have no proof so complete conjecture but I would put money on different maps being given to both drivers last year and thats what made Vettel the stand out guy between the two.

    Webber would of won the title in 2010 if he had gotten the support Vettel received at Red Bull and I won’t forget that.

    Like others on here the Red Bull brand is being really tarnished by the way they conduct themselves in F1 for me at least anyway. I guess tho that its the wider public that they are targeting that will only hear and see Red Bull champions and not how they went about it.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    In 2010, Mark Webber had every chance to win the title, yet despite having a teammate that had the vast majority of the technical failures and bad luck, Webber lost it. That’s because he made errors like Vettel did (crashing in Korea, hitting Lewis in Australia, hitting Heikki in Valencia) and had poor races (Abu Dhabi, Bahrain), which lost himself the title.

    All that happened in 2011 was that Vettel made a few less errors, and didn’t have the car break down while he was leading comfortably. You know, like Australia 2010, Bahrain 2010 and Korea 2010.

    [Reply]


  19.   19. Posted By: Nathan Jones
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 9:31 am 

    Whilst I don’t like bad sportsmanship, to be honest, I love a good spat in sport. Handbags at dawn, cat fights, wars of words, all of them. It adds a flavour of drama to things which just appeals to our more animalistic side. Senna vs Prost. Alonso vs Hamilton. Schumacher vs everyone (first incarnation, that is). I loved them.

    What I really hate is the way all the talking heads/commentators/writers/hacks will pounce all over Lewis Hamilton for as little as frowning on a podium (but keeping his mouth shut), and simply ‘report’ what happened when it comes to Vettel and his finger, his words, and his unrepentance. They’ll tell you what happened but they won’t pass judgement on him. Heaven forbid!

    I’ve heard a lot about what happened but doesn’t anyone at #BBCF1 want to decry or lambast Vettel for what he did? Fine, how about you say something then about how Webber is getting in his head and really screwing with him, driving Vettel to meltdown. Or that he’s scared of Button and Hamilton? How about a running total of all the incidents and crashes he has been involved in over recent seasons, and the witherto and wherefore of why each incident happened, and then a summary judgement on him for being either a crash kid, or unlucky?

    No? Thought not.

    [Reply]

    clifford Jones Reply:

    You’ve got a point mate

    [Reply]


  20.   20. Posted By: Alicia
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 10:10 am 

    I have to agree with the comments here about Vettel. He has a tendency to blame anyone else but himself. After running into Webber in Turkey in 2010 I was amazed at his attitude walking off the track gesturing that Webber was the stupid one. It has been illustrated over the years that balls of steel and a little aggression on the track can give winning results but fans like a racer that will admit when he has taken it too far which Vettel is just unable to do. I am becoming tired of hearing what a “lovely guy” he is from pitlane reporters such as Martin Brundle. He is arrogant but covers it up well most of the time. To be a truely great champion doesn’t just take winning the championship.

    [Reply]

    tradbarton Reply:

    Amen to that. Amen to that.

    [Reply]


  21.   21. Posted By: Franco
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:00 am 

    James, was Adrian Newey responsible for the design of the Leyton House in 1990? One of my early F1 memories was seeing Ivan Capelli come so close to winning a GP that year.

    [Reply]

    David Reply:

    Yes, that was France 1990, and the CG901 was indeed a Newey design. Very tidy car (and a great race).

    [Reply]


  22.   22. Posted By: franed
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:08 am 

    He still seems to think that everyone should give way for him. (Who does he think he is? Schumacher?) he was not lapping but attempting to overtake. His attitude makes one think of the Secret Diary of Adrian Newey, is Marlene right? (No link you can find it for yourselves)

    [Reply]

    franed Reply:

    Marlene is of course now Jana, she changed her name. No it wont make sense until you read the Diary.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    I assume you were kidding since Narain was supposed to give way as he was being lapped.

    [Reply]


  23.   23. Posted By: franed
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:10 am 

    Forgot to say congrats to our Aide and our Noige, very well deserved and overdue.

    [Reply]


  24.   24. Posted By: Richard
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:19 am 

    Good that Newey has been recognised for his design skills. – Never has it been more evident than in 2011 with Red Bull! Vettel is typically German, reluctant to admit it was his fault in the past, and reluctant to admit it was partially his own fault now. A leopard does not change his spots, they just become slightly disguised until emotions get involved.

    [Reply]


  25.   25. Posted By: Andrew Barratt
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:24 am 

    Love to know why its deemed petulant poor behavior if Hamilton shows a hint of frustration but is an acceptable demonstration of passion if Vettel does the same. Lets remember Hamilton has also had to wring the neck of inferior cars for the last three seasons whereas last year was a cruise for RB

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    “Wringing the neck of inferior cars” has nothing to do with the situation. And Vettel cruised to a lot of his race wins because Hamilton (and to a smaller extent Button) plainly underperformed in comparison

    [Reply]

    Joe B Reply:

    Inferior cars to the Red Bull for the last two and a half years, no doubt.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Yes, but what I was referring to was how the Mclaren of last year was in all likelihood closer than their drivers showed. You had qualifying sessions like for instance, Suzuka, Yas Marina and Hungaroring where thew Mclarens made mistakes that effectively threw away pole position. Then there were races where Mclaren had very strong race pace, but didn’t even challenge Vettel, like in Sepang, Spa and Monza.

    There’s no use complaining that their car was inferior when they could have closed the gap further than they actually did.


  26.   26. Posted By: Graeme Cooper
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:49 am 

    I seem to remember Vettel ramming Mark Webber when following a safety car. Vettel was driving the Torro Rosso at the time and possibly robbed Mark Webber of a win for Red Bull. I think that would qualify Vettel for the Idiot award. I can’t understand how Karthikehan was penalised and yet Vettel wasn’t. Vettel also crahsed into Mark Webber when red Bull were runining 1st and 2nd and took himself out of the race. Webber finished 3rd but Vettel got no points and cost red Bull a lot of constuctors points as well. Not very smart but there was no penalty. Looks like Webber can cope with things when they go wrong but Vettel throws his toys out of the pram.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Excuse me, Webber can cope with things when they go wrong, and Vettel throws his toys out of the pram? Do you remember how he collapsed at the end of the 2010 season, with a terrible drive in Abu Dhabi and a crash in Korea that took out Rosberg? Meanwhile Vettel put the Belgium weekend behind him and won 3 out of the final 4 races (only being denied the other one by engine failure).

    [Reply]

    brooksy007 Reply:

    He had another out of car accident!! Badly injured shoulder if I remember correctly – can’t remember if it was fractured!! That might explain part of the reason – the other possibly being the team!!!

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    His shoulder was hardly injured throughout the 2011 season though, was it?

    David A Reply:

    Lewis Hamilton was in control of that race at Fuji, so Mark wouldn’t have won. Footage also showed that Hamilton’s driving under the safety car contributed (not caused entirely) the collision, which meant that Vettel got a 5 place grid penalty rather than 10.

    [Reply]


  27.   27. Posted By: The Hack
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 11:53 am 

    As you have reported, James, Vettel didn’t call Karthikeyan “an idiot,” he called him (in German, of course) “a cucumber.” I humbly suggest that only a native speaker of the German language, and certainly not a posse of bloodthirsty English-speaking tabloid hacks, is capable of appreciating the nuances of that particular insult, just as only an English speaker would know the difference between (say) a “plank” or a “bumbler.”

    Just a thought …

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    Thanks for that

    [Reply]

    anil Reply:

    He did call him an idiot but on the BBC feed. The interview is still on the BBC site believe.

    [Reply]

    The Hack Reply:

    Thanks to Anil for setting me right. It’ll teach me to check my sources more rigorously.

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    He did called him an idiot. He said something like “like on normal road there are idiots driving around and it looks that there’s one here al well”.

    Check it out on the BBC website.

    [Reply]


  28.   28. Posted By: Dunky
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:25 pm 

    Well done to Adrian. He will be remembered with the legends of the sport in the same bracket as Enzo Ferrari and Colin Chapman in my opinion.

    Mansell more than deserves his CBE. The work he does for UK Youth is incredible. Long term he will be Sir Nigel for sure.

    [Reply]


  29.   29. Posted By: Dunky
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:32 pm 

    People give Vettel a hard time, but they forget how young he is. In the heat of the moment at 24 years old can we honestly say we wouldn’t have said something similar?

    Comparisions with Button are unfair has he has over a decade of experience and is much more mature.

    Interesting Stat:

    The top 5 pole sitters Schumi, Senna, Clark, Prost and Mansell were yet to be on pole at Vettel’s age.

    Vettel currently has 30 poles.

    [Reply]


  30.   30. Posted By: Chris
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 12:54 pm 

    All rewards deserved I say. Don’t be to harsh on SV guys, he’s a great driver who’s struggling a little for the first time in a few years. He’s young and a little frustrated,and we’ve all been there, taking the rough with the smooth gets easier with age and experiance.

    It’s worth noting, non of the great drivers in history are happy when they are not winning, and that’s one of the things that makes them so good!!!

    [Reply]


  31.   31. Posted By: Paul Dalgarno
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 1:27 pm 

    Vettel has shown his true colours on this one. He did contribute significantly to the accident, and if he can’t accept that to himself, then he’ll have a problem again. To then be offensive about a fellow driver in a much worse car, and not retract after consideration does show an unpleasant personality trait.

    [Reply]

    James Allen Reply:

    I don’t think you can blame him for the collision with Karthikeyan. It’s quite clear that the backmarker does not hold his line

    [Reply]

    Brukay Reply:

    I don’t know how many times James has pointed out to you guys that karthikeyan did not hold his line that was why he was penalised. Of course he was annoyed it cost him 4th place. If it had happened to Lewis would you all be reading from same sheet, I wonder.

    [Reply]


  32.   32. Posted By: Ben G
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 5:07 pm 

    Glad Adrian got an OBE – tho’ he deserves more.

    But where is Ron’s knighthood?

    [Reply]


  33.   33. Posted By: Rob
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 5:13 pm 

    Expecting F1 drivers to be “nice guys” or judging them to be nice or not through media and perceived behavior on track/TV is very, very silly.

    [Reply]


  34.   34. Posted By: Dwayne
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 6:50 pm 

    Has the photo been squashed to fit, or is Adrian Newey’s head really that flat?

    (Serious question)

    [Reply]


  35.   35. Posted By: Bill Nuttall
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 8:20 pm 

    What on earth does Adrian Newey have to do to earn a knighthood? Can there be a greater role-model for engineers anywhere in the world?

    Meanwhile bankers and political party donors get them by the dozen…

    [Reply]


  36.   36. Posted By: Gene
        Date: April 5th, 2012 @ 9:31 pm 

    We certainly live in an age of overreaction.

    Vettel is not cracking under the pressure because he’s angry he lost 4th place points due to a backmarker’s mistake. He is not the first driver to take another driver to task, and he certainly won’t be the last. He’s not a spoiled child all of a sudden because he’s not currently in the best car on the grid. He’s not someone who says “It’s never my fault” (see SPA 2010). These are the overreactions of people who didn’t like Vettel in the first place for whatever reason. Nothing wrong with not liking a particular driver… but there’s nothing I’ve seen this year from Sebastian to make me believe that he’s any different than the past few years.

    I often find myself defending Vettel, but labeling me a Vettel fan would be incorrect. Being an American, I don’t really have anything nationalistically to root for, so I’m a fan of Formula 1. I like Lewis’ aggressive driving behind the wheel, I like Jensen’s calculated approach, I like Fernando’s incredible skill, I root for Massa and Williams to return to form, I root for Michael to make it to the podium, I root for Peter Sauber to cry after making the podium, I root for Kimi because…. well, he’s Kimi! And I certainly root for any Driver like Vettel who shows tremendous talent on the track and actually let you into their head during interviews… both when they’re doing well and when they’ve had a bad race. It’s been said many times before: We want personalities in the sport, but once Hamilton gets frustrated with the stewards, or Vettel is upset at a backmarker, or Fernando no longer sees F1 as a sport, we’re quick to jump on them.

    BTW, I think generally… 3 years on, bubbling underneath most drivers and teams, there’s a great distain for the last 3 outfits on the grid. Off the record, how many drivers and team personnel would really say that they’re happy to have to contend with teams so off the pace during qualifying and race day?

    [Reply]

    MISTER Reply:

    Hi Gene.
    With regards to you mentioning Spa 2010, it would’ve been foolish for Vettel not to put his hands up. There was noone around. He just lost control and hit JB. I don’t think that is a good example to say that Vettel does take the blame for when he’s at fault.

    Anyway, I think is now time to move away from this subject. There’s less than a week and the action is back on the track. Can’t wait!

    [Reply]

    Brukay Reply:

    Gene well spoken mate I agree wholeheartedly with your comments these guys are starting to sound like that other site Planet F1 god forbid

    [Reply]


  37.   37. Posted By: Joe B
        Date: April 6th, 2012 @ 12:09 am 

    I’m still waiting, and I’m an awesome student :D

    [Reply]

    Joe B Reply:

    Whoops, that was meant for way up thread :S

    [Reply]


  38.   38. Posted By: Gareth Foches
        Date: April 6th, 2012 @ 10:28 am 

    The teams of Formula 1 and by extension, all their employees, make their money by being public faces. By waving a phallic gesture in the field and later labelling his opponent, Vettel engaged in the basest violations of modern sports culture.

    By no mean is this boorish behavior rare in sports, but often, the culprit gets a yellow card or some form of sanction. However, both FIA and RBR saw no reason for punishment nor regret. Soon, the mild raising hand and shaking fist in the cockpit will be a thing of the past, drivers can bare their bottoms, rock their pelvic, and insult mothers.

    When a child does this, he goes to stand in the corner, when a 24 yr old ‘child’ does this, he gets mollycuddled. Disgusting!

    [Reply]


  39.   39. Posted By: David Ryan
        Date: April 6th, 2012 @ 6:38 pm 

    Irrespective of whether Vettel or Karthikeyan was at fault for the incident (personally I feel it’s a racing incident), there is still a proper way to conduct yourself when these things happen. To give some examples, I saw two accidents in the final race of the Ginetta SuperCup at Brands Hatch, both triggered by driver mistakes and one ending in a particularly nasty shunt for one driver. In the nastier of the two, the driver who triggered the accident was full of contrition and the other drivers involved regarded it as a racing incident without mud-slinging. In contrast, the lesser incident saw handbags at dawn and the drivers being physically separated by the marshals. Unfortunately Vettel’s response showed more of the latter than the former, and much as I can understand his frustration and the emotions at play that isn’t good enough. You can express your personality without flying off the handle at your competitors, after all.

    [Reply]

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