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Hamilton visits street children in Manila
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Lewis Hamilton - UNICEF
Posted By: James Allen  |  29 Mar 2012   |  8:13 pm GMT  |  92 comments

Lewis Hamilton got to see first hand the hardships faced by street children in Manila this week when he headed straight from the Malaysian Grand Prix to the capital of the Philippines to record a short film for UNICEF.

The 2008 F1 world champion met some of the estimated 85,000 children who live and work on the streets in Manila, documenting his experiences in the Binondo area of the city in a film that will air during the celebrity football event Soccer Aid that raises money for children’s charity UNICEF and airs on ITV1 in the UK on May 27.

During his two-day trip Hamilton spent time with a 10-year-old boy called Reynold who looks after two younger brothers by working and begging to earn money for food, the family forced to live in an old wooden cart on the outskirts of a market. As well as talking to the children, Hamilton got to see the work UNICEF do to help and protect them such as the provision of mobile educational services, regular health clinics and helping to move them into safe community environments.

Hamilton’s film will be one of a number shown during the Soccer Aid programme highlighting UNICEF’s work and the McLaren driver hopes his film can help shed light on the struggles faced by millions of such childen around the world.

“I hope that we have managed to make a film that will show the harsh reality for children who live on the streets in Manila and around the world. The young boys and girls who I have met today are really fantastic children, but they are living without the simple things that most people take for granted, like food, clean water and a safe place to sleep at night.  It shouldn’t be like this,” he said.

“But I’ve also seen how UNICEF and their partners are helping them and changing their lives for the better. Just a little money can make a huge difference for vulnerable children living tough lives around the world.  Please, buy a ticket for Soccer Aid in May, or watch the programme and make a donation.  It could be the difference between life and death for a child.”

All profits raised from ticket sales for the match, along with donations during the programme on May 27, will go to funding UNICEF’s worldwide work.

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92 Comments
  1. Roger Hoyes says:

    Well done Lewis.In a big money business like F1 it is always good when drivers, teams and sponsors lend their names to good causes.(and some cash).

    1. Wayne says:

      Agreed. Lewis, you have always said you love and admire Senna, this is a great way to try and emulate him, much more so than on track where Senna had his issues just as you have. Senna was renownded for his work with the street children of Brazil and this legacy lives on to this day. This is time well spent – brining these issues to new audiences such as this one.

    2. XH1UNDA says:

      Great work Lewis. Much respect.

  2. Peter Freeman says:

    What % of the money UNICEF raise is spent directly on children?

    1. zzzzzzzzzzzzz says:

      more than they would get from you!! [mod] am sure there could be improvements in the way charitable organisations are run, but the implication of your argument is simply to give nothing.

      Do you have a better alternative and if so are you putting your money where your mouth is?

      1. Peter Freeman says:

        Thanks for the reply, zzzzz, please believe that I was not implying that UNICEF are bad, or that giving to them is wrong I was just asking a question to give me (or anyone else) an actual incite into the organisation. It would be great to learn they have a 90% through put rate!

        My personal ‘charity’ is not and never has been charity at all. I get directly involved in people and families, get to know them, visit them, love them. The problem most desperate people face is that no one has ever loved them personally and given them a sense of peronal value. Of course this means more than just money and requires giving of yourself into people, often not at convinent times and not always an easy thing to do, often requiring baring with anger frustration and tears.

        But its what Jesus did :)

        Respect to Lewis for going in person.

      2. David says:

        But the problem with your philosophy–as admirable as it is and we are all your admirers–is (a) it’s a false choice (one does not preclude the other), and (b) that personal commitment that you so strongly demonstrate just isn’t shared by enough people, nor do they work together to address the problem in a systematic way. Only a broader organisation can do that.

        UNICEF actually has a quite good efficiency rating. It’s easy enough to determine that–why not have a go?

    2. nick says:

      It appears to be around 90%, which seems pretty good.

    3. Wayne says:

      Everything minus expenses? They have to pay to get people out there and for the medical and food provisions. What were you expecting? It is not organisations such as UNICEF that we need to worry about, rather it is the governments of corrupt regimes made up almost entirely of sub-human scum who lead their people into poverty and keep them there through diabolical greed and repression. Think also of western governments who tie overseas aid to commerce and loans that keep these nations in poverty indefinitely.

      Every single human being on this planet should feel touched by shame that there are children living and dieing on the streets all over the world. We are one species, one people – these children are the same where it matters as the children that play in our parks. We would not tollerate lonely, cold, hungry ‘lost children’ in our streets – distance should mean nothing.

    4. Nick says:

      Nearly all of it as the actual cost of running the organization is payed by governments.

  3. Krampa says:

    Lewis, please keep the earrings off!

    1. Wayne says:

      Wow, this year’s prize for ‘most misjudged and ill timed comment’ goes to……….

  4. Charalampos says:

    From the photos he looks ready to become a daddy. It would not suit his public profile though.

    1. Thejesh Sugow says:

      +1 :-)

  5. goferet says:

    Aww… Bless his soul.

    Yup, I also do recall David Beckham making this trip to the Philippines for UNICEF, no doubt this gesture of charity is a 1,000 times more better than offering your helmet for auction and may the good Lord shower Lewis Hamilton will blessings for taking the time out of his busy schedule to make this documentary.

    Unfortunately there are somethings & injustices that can never end in this life of yours no matter what we do and we thought communism would do the trick but that just proved to create more problems than solutions as can be seen by our mates over in North Korea.

    Anyway, all one can do is the little they can & try to move on with their lives for if governments can’t solve their people’s problems then sure as hell, individuals & organizations won’t get far.

    P.s.

    So this film will air on ITV on May 27th!

    Hmm… The same May 27th in which the Monaco Grand Prix (aka Lewis Hamilton’s backyard) will take place.

    As the laws of the Universe state —> 1 + 1 = 1

    1. CraigD says:

      Good work by Hamilton, and interesting. But man – this may not get through – you talk a lot of twaddle!

      1. Good Lord. Sure… Sure…
      2. When did anyone ever think Communism was a solution. An ideal theory perhaps but surely never practically acceptable as worthy by most.
      3. Monaco – Hamilton’s backyard? He’s won there once and messed up other times. Sure, he like it as do others, but stating it’s his ‘backyard’ suggests he own the place like Graham Hill or Aryton Senna. No!

      1. goferet says:

        @ CraigD

        Monaco – Hamilton’s backyard?
        ——————————————

        What I meant is Monaco is Lewis’ new home = his backyard or playground.

    2. daphne says:

      Ah common, a tad cynical, no? Lewis is a nice guy who was “lead astray” for a while by clueless management and weirdly negative publicity…he’s obviously back on track now and wouldn’t be doing this if he did’t want to.

  6. Sascha says:

    Lewis Hamilton is a great ambassador for F1 and a great role model.
    Some may say it’s a part of his job, or PR,but he choose to do it, and the smiles on the childrens and Lewis Hamiltons faces are no fake

    1. bad_whippet says:

      @ Sascha

      Exactly what I was going to say… this isn’t PR, the faces say it all in just two photos.

      Good on him.

    2. Sonnie says:

      Lewis is a great ambassador and we don’t often get the chance to see this part of him.

      I’ve had the privilege of ‘people-watching’, that is looking at what’s going on in the paddocks not only at the recent Malaysian GP, but a number of others in the past. And, I can assure you that Lewis is wonderful with the children who ‘high-five’ him and ask for autographs. He really is one of the few drivers who graciously provide autographs with good humour and a genuine smile (not the false smiles photographers and cameramen always want to capture while he is in fact working hard at his day job).

      In a world where celebrity ‘hugging’ has a tendency to look awkward and painful, only a naturally ‘beautiful’ person is able to emerge and transcend the status of celebrity. It is these personal qualities that UNICEF will benefit throughout Lewis’s ambassadorship. So I wish him all the very best with all the work he is able to do for them this year and in the future.

    3. XH1UNDA says:

      True – its the sincerity of the smiles on those kids’ faces that makes the difference. They were all enjoying being together and seems like Lewis was actually making them very happy.

  7. daphne says:

    Finally, the kind of PR he needs. Didier Coton is busy. Hamilton really admires Senna and this is the kind of thing Senna was famous (and loved) for, off the track.

  8. Parazar says:

    This is such a positive way for someone to spend their time. Just thinking about children living under such conditions breaks my heart. Makes you think twice about complaining over trivial mishaps.

  9. [MISTER] says:

    Glad to see Lewis doing his bit.
    More exposure means more funds raised.
    Keep it going Lewis.

    James, I still can’t believe how many articles you’re posting in such short time. You’ve got a great team and good control and planning of your time. Thanks.

      1. prideaux says:

        James,I admire the way your team present their articles,way better than some renowned columnist and very informative.Keep it up.

      2. Paul J says:

        +1 on that – I was just listening to your latest podcast, and thinking to myself “where do you find time to do all this stuff!?”. We appreciate it.

      3. XH1UNDA says:

        Either the money is good or James is more fanatic about F1 than most who post here. Most likely its both.

    1. Pete says:

      +1 James! Awesome Job!

  10. Trent says:

    Great photos, thanks for that.

  11. Tornillo Amarillo says:

    Well done Lewis & UNICEF & JAonF1.

    Very nice pics!

  12. Shiparch says:

    Very nice to see people helping the children, and when an F1 driver lends a hand is great as well. Now we have Alonso and Hamilton as UNICEF ambassadors, hope some other F1 drivers follow, Bernie can lend a hand too.

    1. Wayne says:

      Bernie could probably save 10,000 with a single cheque.

      1. Brent McMaster says:

        Ecclestone could write a cheque eliminate leprosy and still be a billionaire.

  13. Craig in Manila says:

    Big thanks to UNICEF and LH for their efforts in this regard.
    Hopefully, the Government is embarrassed by the contents of this film as it is truly a terrible situation here in Manila in regard to the poor and the homeless.

    1. jay jacob says:

      Hi Craig,

      Just a question, and i feel silly asking this, where are the parents / relatives? maybe you can share with us a little bit more.

      Thanks

      1. Craig @ Manila says:

        The family may well be on the street with them or has disintegrated and the kids are fending for themselves.
        Unfortunately, the Philippines has basically no “safety nets” like government healthcare, unemployment benefits or housing for the poor so, if you have no job, you have nothing and when I say nothing I mean nothing.
        It’s a beautiful, vibrant country with beautiful, caring people and I never want to leave and I’d fully recommend that, if in the area, people should visit but when the plane is coming in to land, look out the window at the shanty towns that you are flying over and please remember that it doesn’t hurt to leave some loose change in a kids hand. They will give you the biggest, bestest, heartfeltest smile that you’ve ever seen.

      2. MISTER says:

        Thanks for the insight Craig. It makes you look out on the window and realize how privileged most of us are.

  14. tom in adelaide says:

    I too was in Manila last week for work. It’s a strange place, the city is full of malls (from what I was told Makati City has the world’s second largest mall and Ortigas (a few kilometres away) has the world’s fourth largest mall. They all just seemed really big to me.

    Within the CBD I hardly saw any signs of what you would call ‘extreme poverty’. Then one night on my way back to the hotel, close to midnight, a girl who I can only guess was 3 or 4 years old came running through heavy traffic and stood in front of me. She was holding some wilted little flowers in one hand and had her other held out in front of her. It was a heartbreaking moment.

    Good on Lewis for giving his time to help.

    1. Shir0 says:

      Hi Tom,

      Makati City’s CBD is a manicured big business area. There are few like it in the Philippines and your observation about the lack of signs of poverty there because they have to keep that kind of “false image”.

      I’m born, bred and probably will die here in the Philippines. Poverty here is not even close to a secret. Corruption and social injustice prevades from the private sector to the government. There are people here who are doing something about it but it’s not enough and without getting the government straightened out from its roots to the top, I’m afraid the situation will stay like this for a long time.

      Anyway, it’s good to see Lewis, a sportsman from a “high profile/high finance” type of sport to come to Manila to do charity. It’s even better that he did so not because of sponsorship ties/duties.

      I hope to see him do well this season and in future seasons. Lewis focusing his extra time more on endeavours like this rather than spending it in celebrity lifestyle gigs should give him inner peace he needs to help him concentrate more on what he does best. Driving and winning!

  15. Michael Cunningham says:

    well done.

  16. jay jacob says:

    Good-on-ya Lewis !

    Good work JA & team for posting this. We do take for granted what we have and it feels good to be humbled by this story, and take time each day to count our blessings.

    1. James Allen says:

      We like to show all sides of the sport in a rounded offering.

      1. Sinnr says:

        That’s the reason I log on everyday. Unbiased and honest reporting. The way it should be. Total respect.

  17. R3D says:

    I’m from Manila and not one LOCAL news outlet reported on this! Shame on them!

    Anyway :) I’m glad Lewis came here and gave these kids something to be happy about, hardships notwithstanding.

      1. R3D says:

        No, I’m not kidding James :). However, if it was done in secret, I’d understand why the press release was done today. Yahoo News Philippines only picked this report an hour ago as I type this.

        Here in the Philippines everyone is crazy for basketball, boxing and soccer more than motor racing. Even the local Top Gear publication didn’t know he arrived until today :/

      2. Brent McMaster says:

        I think the lack of press is likely intentional it would have turned into a photo shoot of Hamilton rather then being about the kids.

      3. rcf says:

        He’s not. I myself only found out thru your site James. Guess the local media didn’t think too many people would be interested to know that a world champion was in town!

      4. Craig @ Manila says:

        Nup, R3D aint kidding.
        I knew nothing about it either.

      5. Shir0 says:

        Ditto. I hail from the suburbs on the outskirts of Manila and a big F1 fan in my own right. Such a shame we only have Star Sports to broadcast F1 here because it sucks.

        And may it rain a deluge of shame on the media institutions here for not spending even just a single ticker line on TV or even a short article on the big publications about this.

        I do hope the motoring magazines get an article out next month and publish a special feature on Lewis’ visit. Better yet, I hope Lewis can come back after the Chinese GP and do a gig with some driving and hand pressing!

    1. Kevin Green says:

      Is there comprehensive tv coverage of F1 in the Philippines whether it be live of highlights???

      1. James Allen says:

        Don’t know about now, probably. But I know there used to be at least up to 2008. They took the ITV commentary back in the days when I was doing it.

      2. rcf says:

        We get F1 live via Star Sports. But not much interest. It’s mostly basketball and boxing over here.

      3. Shir0 says:

        Only ESPN-Star broadcasts F1 qualifying and the race. It’s just riddled with commercials/advertisements and are frequently done on the most critical moments. It sucks.

        I was kind of praying to any motoring deity out there to get the BBC or even SpeedTV broadcast F1 here but alas, with the entry of SKY, that would not happen anymore.

      4. Craig @ Manila says:

        Free to air TV : nothing.
        Cable : ESPN/StarSports shows live Quali and Race and a good pre & post summary package.

        As per R3D’s comment, F1 (or car racing in general) is not terribly popular here. I told my staff that I was going to pop down to Melbourne for the Grand Prix and I got some pretty blank looks !

      5. Shir0 says:

        Hi Craig,

        Are there job openings in your team? I promise to look starry-eyed whenever you mention “drive-through penalty”. :)

  18. jpinx says:

    Hi James- thanks for yet another high quality and informative report on the background to F1. Great work by Lewis, UNICEF and their support teams. It’s not eay for a guy to drop out of fairyland into the sh*t-heap that is normal life to so many. Please can some F1 pesonality do the same for the kids here in Bangkok, or nearby in Rangoon, Pnom Phen, Vientiene. If Tony Fernandes would like some brownie points he could do worse to spread the wealth and happiness of F1 to many cities on his home patch. Stay away from governments and ‘churches’ – they are usually a big part of the problem ;)

  19. kfzmeister says:

    Can’t help but criticize this sort of Publicity stunt. It is said that if you want to do a good deep, then do it, yet tell nobody about it.
    All these sort of PR events are self serving one way or the other. Let’s get lewis out of his funk, let’s show a different (artificial) side of him, etc.,…
    Boooo…

    1. Phil Irwin says:

      kfzmeister your wrong. Publicity is EXACTLY what these childrens plight needs. If he’d gone round boasting about giving money to the charity then that would be poor form, but taking the time to use his fame to make people more aware of this situation is not self serving PR. Good on you Lewis.

    2. Shir0 says:

      It’s not exactly a publicity stunt if nobody knew he was coming here in Manila. And that’s exactly what happened: nobody knew. If not for this article by James, I bet you, kfzmeister, wouldn’t have known either. So cut the guy some slack.

      Oh and BTW, Phil is right. “Publicity is EXACTLY what these children’s plight needs.”

    3. newton says:

      If your good deed is to bring attention to the suffering of children, you’d have to be monstrously dimwitted to tell nobody about it, wouldn’t you?

    4. Paul J says:

      I see what you’re saying, but LH’s presence in itself will raise awareness, and therefore raise funds. He has the eyes of the world upon him, and so bringing that attention to something that really needs attention is a very good way of helping out. Sure, his image will probably benefit too, but I like to think that that’s not his primary concern.

  20. “Lewis Hamilton got to see first hand the hardships faced by street children in….”

    so all the adults are doing just fine then?

    1. Tom in adelaide says:

      Of all the articles to make a cynical comment on……

      1. Excuse me for believing each life to be of equal value regardless of weather the person is 8 days, 8 weeks, 8 months, or 8 decades.

    2. newton says:

      why say that? nobody’s suggesting all the adults are doing just fine.

  21. Anand R says:

    Genuine smile from all on the pix!

  22. Chris Allsop says:

    Also can’t help but be a bit cynical….

    Yes he admires Senna and would like to follow the model he left us but some perspective is needed:

    Senna donated his OWN money, privately, to good causes and was ready to invest even more in the Senna Foundation.

    Hamilton gave up some time to make a public film- is it really the same?

    I do respect him for doing it and, yes, it will bring it to the attention of the public but I won’t be blinded to think it won’t be looked at as good publicity for him.

    Beckham/Hamilton etc, these guys live on another planet to even the “better off” of us and I am sure if one really wanted to do some good they would be looking to donate and set up an improved way to get funding etc. to those in need.

    1. Sinnr says:

      How do you know they don’t donate their own cash? Perhaps they do and choose not to have it published.

    2. newton says:

      and how do you know he’s not done/doing that?

    3. newton says:

      …and then you have people like kfzmeister saying “It is said that if you want to do a good deed, then do it, yet tell nobody about it”…

      So, what he has to do is donate the money secretly but make sure people know about it.

      [rolls eyes]

      1. Chris says:

        It’s not black and white guys- I never suggest they don’t….but I never suggest they do.
        Just think its not something that any one of us wouldn’t do if we had the personality and fame to do so. If we earned as much as these guys and could have as much influence I would like to think we would all do the same right?

        Can’t win in many ways.

      2. XH1UNDA says:

        i know the discussion here has touched on the similiarities between Senna’s choice of charities in Brazil and what Lewis did in Philipines but i do not see why you appear to suggest that he is doing it because of Senna. What is the alternative? Not to do it and never get to let the rest of the world know that kids in philipines are in the same situation as the kids that Senna helped in Brazil?

        Let’s not cheat ourselves, the world now is so capitalistic, moving such huge somes of money that what Lewis earns could hardly make much of a difference on a street in Grenada. We all need to play our part and in way, that is what Lewis is telling us by visiting Philipines. As the late Nobel Prize winning Kenyan environmentalist Prof Wangari Mathai used to say, “just play your part, however small it is” it will make a difference.

    4. JohnBt says:

      Hey give Lewis a chance, Senna came from a very wealthy family though. Lewis’s dad held 2 jobs to get keep his son in motor racing so I’m sure has donated money to charities but not mentioned. True charity is giving quietly.

  23. Kev says:

    That’s the most relaxed I’ve seen Lewis looking for a while. Really nice to see him out of the racing suit. Well done Lewis.

  24. Richard says:

    It’s simply great that Lewis has found the time to do this, and his quote saying “It should’t be like this” says it all. The good work Unicef does can only be helped by people like Lewis helping to raise the level of exposure of the plight of children like these around the world. – They are great kids and deserve a better start in life than this, but it’s a long road because it’s about education and development of a country which takes time. It’s also important to recognise that Britain was once like that, and it requires political will, and a degree of prosperity to bring about permanent change.

  25. CarlH says:

    It’s really nice to see him looking so happy and relaxed whilst also contributing to a good cause.

    I just hope he can find a way to be like this during the GP weekend, because to me he still doesn’t look completely settled, which is a shame.

    If he could find a way to get back to the mindset he had in 2007 he would be incredibly difficult to beat over the course of a season.

    I’m a huge Alonso fan but I’ve still always had a soft spot for Lewis, and a happy and on-form Hamilton is good for F1.

  26. Brent McMaster says:

    It is always great to see a celebrity bring focus to the plight of the down trodden and good for Hamilton for doing so. But I find it a little off putting that a single man, making tens of millions a year on top of free everything else (cars, meals, hotels, clothes,vacations etc. etc. etc.) won’t pay taxes that would help his fellow Brits off the streets. Does a guest appearance in tv ad make up for evading paying millions in taxes at home? How many kids would the taxes from Buttons, Coultards and Hamiltons incomes have helped at home?

    1. David says:

      Well-put. For U.S. readers, there was an interesting story in an issue of _The New Yorker_ about celebrity use of “philanthropy agents” to help them polish up the public reputation a bit.

    2. Basil says:

      Taxes are going directly back to the banks from which our government took the credit from. Check out how the money system works by watching the documentary “The Money Masters”, it’s free on YouTube.

      1. XH1UNDA says:

        Or going back to China which lent the banks and governments in the first place as investments only for that money to be used to crash individuals freedoms of the Chinese down trodden.

        Anyway that is not a debate for JAoF1 but the way the world works now is very much determined by Game Theory – something will happen because it helps those with influence – people try and get into win-win situations. So long us the stupidly influential types such as Bernie are kept to a minimum and the world has a truly large middle class, good things, not perfect things, but good things will somehow happen.

  27. Paul J says:

    Good to see Hamilton involved in this. He is a hero to so many people, and his name carries a lot of weight, so I really hope that this will help raise awareness and funds.

  28. richard c says:

    after reading some of the negative comments regarding LH I am somewhat confused??!!?? That bloke cannot win!! Maclaren support UNICEF and as their No 1 driver represented them as such. To bring his income or other drivers is irrelevant and I pity those people who do!Good on ya Lewis I will be putting money in the UNICEF tin tommorow………….I suggest we all do!

    1. Brent McMaster says:

      I pity those who don’t question a celebrity’s motives and actions when it comes to charity. Hamiltons made 100 million in income and paid no taxes; I guess for some a UNICEF ad makes up for that.

      1. aezy_doc says:

        Who cares about their motives? If good is done from a bad motive, then good is still done. Would you prefer that he had not done the ad? You’d probably damn him either way.
        I’d imagine you lambasted Bob Geldof back in the 80s for highlighting the plight of the Ethiopians caught in famine.
        And as to taxes, it’s up to them where they live and abide by the tax rules of the country they live in. As many people have said, how do you know what Hamilton or other drivers spend their money on?
        Finally I prefer their something to the majority’s nothing.

      2. Brent McMaster says:

        I don’t agree with you motive is important. You have no grounds on which to make the statements you made about what I would do or did do in the past. Yes it is up to them where they live and how and if evading taxes is what makes them feel good that is their right.

  29. Steve Zodiac says:

    Any one who has paid attention will know that Lewis is a thoroughly nice chap who has got where he is by way of his talent and his, and his Fathers, dedication and hard work. Sure he has made some mistakes along the way, but, haven’t we all? It’s just that none of us have had to do our growing up in public

  30. jeremySmith says:

    Every picture tells a story… I burst into tears when I saw that picture, as they could be my girls..

    When are we going to learn…

    Bless you Lewis, thank you…

  31. JohnBt says:

    Credit goes to Lewis for his action. A good deed from a celebrity will surely open your eyes.

    WELL DONE LEWIS.

  32. Kay Jay says:

    Hamilton is a paradox one which I believe cannot be fathomed or understood in the UK.

    There is a class structure that continues to prevail and in my opinion, I for one hopes Lewis leaves the UK and plies is trade on other continents where they respect success and judge a man by the content of his character [mod]

    After all had JB made this trip, his ‘integrity’ would never be questioned.

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