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Posted By: James Allen  |  23 Jun 2011   |  7:59 pm GMT  |  66 comments

Toro Rosso driver Jaime Alguersuari was speaking today about his season so far and batting away questions about whether he is likely to be moved aside in order for Daniel Ricciardo to be given a chance to do a race weekend, or maybe a series of them.

“I think it is interesting as he (Ricciardo) gets to try different things on the car and at the end, still this year, I did not find the best way to improve the car, the performance, and am just still learning about the set-up, about the tyres, about so many things on the car,” said the Spaniard.

“It is interesting that he also gets to know the car, to try to improve things on the car. I think it is quite interesting and it makes things a bit easier, a bit faster. But still I am not 100 per cent happy with everything going on. I think Canada was very important for us and we are finding our way to the best performance.”

This is an interesting subject, as it is quiet common to see drivers getting a chance mid-season for various reasons; injury to a principal, or poor performance.

Still only 21 years old, Alguersuari had a decent result in Canada; eighth his career best in F1 and his first points of the season, but he has generally been outperformed by Sebastien Buemi. Canada was only his second points finish in his last 21 starts. He’s started 34 races in total and Hungary will be his second anniversary in F1.

However, he’s been vulnerable in qualifying and was eliminated in Q1 at the last 2 races, and was outqualified by both Lotuses in Monaco. He has only beaten Buemi in qualifying once but it was a significant one; 7th in China was Toro Rosso’s best qualifying performance of the season.

This year I think we will see a couple of new driver opportunities. I do think Ricciardo will get an outing and he deserves a chance to do a race weekend, but my understanding of the situation at Toro Rosso is that Sebastien Buemi is very close to Red Bull special adviser Helmut Marko and Alguersuari brings some money to the team. So finding a chance for Ricciardo isn’t as straightforward as it was when they moved Sebastien Bourdais or Scott Speed aside.

Meanwhile we have Nico Hulkenberg in a reserve driver role at Force India. Adrian Sutil is vulnerable there because of the criminal complaint against him which has been filed with the prosecutor in Munich over the night club glassing incident with Genii’s Eric Lux. Sutil insisted today that his seat is safe, but he’s not dealing well with rookie Paul di Resta’s pace in the sister car and Force India boss Vijay Mallya is being cagey about what he might do if Sutil is formally charged with grievous bodily harm.

Karun Chandhok is in the reserve role at Team Lotus and it will be interesting to see what happens for the Indian Grand Prix on October 30th. The temptation for an Asian team to run an Indian driver at that race will be very strong and if one of the race drivers had to make way one wonders if it might be Jarno Trulli who gave a very downbeat interview to Gazzetta dello Sport yesterday in which he said that if things don’t improve it would be better not to continue in F1.

“I’m not having a great time, ” said the 36 year old Italian. “The car isn’t aerodynamically efficient after a tough 2010 I thought we would be battling in the midfield, but we are still behind. Lotus is still gaining experience.”

Trulli said that the lack of precision in the steering is the main problem, he cannot feel the limit of the car, which hurts his qualifying pace mainly, which has always been his strong point.

He has the air of a driver reaching the end of his F1 career, “I’m used to fighting for podiums and wins. Like this it’s tough. I might look around outside F1. I’m not interested in Indycar, but maybe in Le Mans 24 hours.”

(Alguersuari photo: Darren Heath)

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66 Comments
  1. Lee says:

    James,

    Any info or thoughts on the rumour doing the rounds about Senna replacing Heidfeld from Silverstone onwards?

    1. Sebee says:

      Heart tells me they should give him a chance.

      But holding onto 4th by only 8 points over Mercedes means they can’t make this kind of gamble. Every point counts, and Nick gives you points like Red Bull gives you wins.

    2. Hell No says:

      If Senna gets the chance I should think it might finally show how good he is as the HRT was poor and yes I remember Klien wiping the floor with him. But he had the occasional result in GP2 so maybe a half decent car. But I agree the risk cold only come at the end of the year if Merc are beaten.

      Obviously Jaime has had his chance and I do not think either TR drivers are lighting any fires, so both should now make way. Not for Grosjean though, Ricciardo and… maybe the Ferrari junior Vergne? is it?

      But when will Lotus see the light and end the saga with Karun. He is 27 for heavens sake and his results in GP2 were non-existant.

    3. James says:

      Thats will never happen as long as I have a say.

  2. Robert says:

    Trulli should be dumped by Lotus, as he just isn’t getting the job done in the car.
    Sutil should be dumped as he is being thoroughly outperformed by his rookie teammate. He has had great races in the past, but they were exceptions to the rule. Generally he isn’t faster than the car.
    It’s a tough one at STR. Both drivers have done well, yet done poorly. Bring Ricciardo up, while moving Algeursuari to Williams, so Williams can put Rubens to pasture – where he belongs.

    Heidfeld should be careful his seat doesn’t evaporate as well. With his experience, I expected better.

    Massa should be sat on the curb as well. Do a swap with Sauber for Kamui. Ferrari prefer to have a tiered driver line-up, so developing Kamui could pay dividends for the team in 1-3 years. He has pace and the ability to overtake. What he needs now is a consistent car; a car that can allow him to qualify higher so that he starts ahead of mid-pack.

    1. . says:

      “Sutil should be dumped as he is being thoroughly outperformed by his rookie teammate”

      Sutil 8 points in championship, Di Resta 2 points. And Di Resta has been making amateur mistakes last few races.

      British drivers as usual being painted much better than they actually are. Thanks to the BBC.

      1. MISTER says:

        Nobody’s painting anything.
        The results speak for themselves.
        Sutil outqualified Di Resta in Turkey only.
        Di Resta outqualified Sutil in 6 out of 7 races.
        Sutil finished before Di Resta in 2 out of 7 races.
        Di Resta finished before Sutil in 3 out of 7 races.

        I did not take into account the 2 DNF both drivers had in total.

      2. / says:

        “Nobody’s painting anything.
        The results speak for themselves.”

        The results: Sutil 8 points in championship, Di Resta 2 points. Period.

        The team cares about the points in the end, that is what determines theie income, not flashydriving on the track that gives them zero points.

        Yes, the Brotish side always paint the British driver like they do something amazing, while in the end, it is normal.

      3. MISTER says:

        To /:
        Nobody is trying to “paint” the idea that Di Resta has more points then Sutil. LOL. That is pretty obvious.
        The thing we were discussing above was the performance of the two drivers. and in my opinion, Di Resta did deliver better performance (not results) then Sutil. And this was in his first 7 races in F1 in his life. How many races did Sutil did in F1?

      4. Werewolf says:

        As we approach the second half of the season, the question becomes “who has the most potential for next year” rather than “who has out-performed who”. In my opinion, the answer to the first question is Di Resta, who appears faster, very determined and has a strong reputation from the lower formulae, something anyone who has watched him race will surely say is deserved.

        The mistakes of the last two races were typical rookie errors, hardly amateurish. In fact, the hairpin move at Monaco would have worked a treat in a DTM Mercedes, suggesting he still has a little bit of mindset change to achieve.

        Sutil has been occasionally impressive in the past, less so this year, and I have to admit to having reached the conclusion, given his experience now, that he either needs a complete change of team or that his career is never going to progress.

      5. Galapago555 says:

        +1

        I would love to see Di Resta on a competitive car, the sooner the better. One of the most interesting new comers, IMHO.

      6. Robert says:

        If di Resta hadn’t been slapped with uncalled for penalties, he’d have earned more points. He is getting the better of Sutil in qualifying. Sutil has years under his belt and has never really grown as a driver; he looks as though he is still struggling.

  3. Seán Craddock says:

    James,

    I can’t get my head around Trulli’s power stearing issue. He’s been saying it for a while now and it seems Kovalainen is compfortable enough in the car.

    Do you know what exactly the issue is? Is it that Jarno doesn’t like the system? And why have the team not done anything about it?

    Also, who’s car does Ricciardo drive in FP1? Is it always Jaime’s?

    1. Dave Myers says:

      They have swapped around, so Ricciardo is in Algersuari’s car one weekend and then Buemi’s the next. Force India have generally done the same with Hulkenberg, except he was in di Resta’s car for the first two weekends. Either way, we all know that the way both of those teams are run often makes no sense and there may or may not be a predictable pattern or a driver change in either team.

    2. Listen to Ted Kravitz’ interviews with Heikki and Jarno in the last Team Lotus podcast.

      To sum up briefly, Kovalainen seems to make do whilst Trulli needs to feel the steering to extract maximum speed.

    3. Ryan Eckford says:

      Ricciardo takes turns in being in Buemi’s car and Alguersuari’s car. He is not always in Alguersuari’s car for Free Practice 1 on Friday Mornings.

  4. Big Si says:

    James.
    Off topic but on tuesday thought I’d pop to watch a new film at the cinema in Witney. Multistorey packed, queue out the door but I could not get in for people leaving the previous screening. Once inside well over 500 people. The one lady on pop corn was having palpertations. Ended up I watched a film about some Brazilian bloke who knew his under steer from his over steer. Dramatic film with some remarkable footage, especially that of Ratzenberg commenting on Barrachello accident.
    Are the audience big all over?

  5. Grabyrdy says:

    With the lack of testing these days, and all the technological gizmos drivers have to cope with, it’s really really tough on young drivers coming through. With this system, you have to wonder if someone like Mansell would ever have made it further than the mid second-year cut-off point.

  6. Ian Connell says:

    Trulli has had his best-days in F1. At times he was awesome….but now I think he would be great in sportscars though.

    I hope they give Karun Chandhok a break to race at the Indian Gp this year and in 2012 all year. His attitude to F1 and racing is refreshing. Anyone who can lead Monaco and win at Spa in F3000 (or was it GP2?) deserves a good chance in F1.

    1. Dave Myers says:

      I have to agree. Notwithstanding a gutsy drive with a lose piece of equipment moving in the cockpit in Canada, Trulli has under-performed and over-complained. I think Karun may well be in the car at some point later in the season (maybe the races after Monza?), and Trulli will have to seriously up his game if he is to prevent this. I’m sorry, but ‘power steering issues’ has sounded like a poor excuse to me.

  7. TG says:

    “I’m used to fighting for podiums and wins.” – Trulli

    Really?

    1 win 11 podiums 14 seasons.

    No offence, but “Used to” might be pushing it a tad.

    1. Andy says:

      Maybe he meant he was used to his team mates fighting for podiums and wins.

    2. Rubinho's Keyfob says:

      ‘No offence, but “Used to” might be pushing it a tad.’

      He said “used to fighting for”, not “used to getting”.

      What he’s saying is that he’s used to being in the mid-field with a shot at a podium rather than being at the back with a shot at getting to mid-field.

      So, the bottom line is that he’s finding it hard to be currently “fighting for” the chance to finish a race in a position he would have considered an average or poor performance in the past.

      I’m no great fan, but I think that’s understandable :)

    3. Laurence H says:

      I was going to post the same comment! I know he was always a really popular driver, but, at best, a good driver, nothing more.

    4. Joe says:

      HAHA…good one TG!
      I was thinking the same thing myself. What I think he means is he is used to fighting for points.

    5. Steven says:

      LOL I had the same thought!

    6. rdw says:

      Yeah, I thought exactly the same thing as I read the piece.

    7. Jeff says:

      Yes, I think its the case of time up. Lack of new driver testing has given, Heidfeld, Trulli, Barricello, and Fisicella( I know he’s gone), longer careers than they otherwise would have been the case.

    8. Femi Akins says:

      To fight doesn’t mean to win

    9. Justin says:

      the difference between Trulli’s attitude and that of Kovalainen is night and day.

      Kovalainen is a true team player and shares the vision of Mike Gasgoyne and the rest of the team. Trulli is a moaning prima donna; his wine is excellent though, maybe he should concentrate on that?

  8. Andrew says:

    I don’t understand the logic in dumping Heidfeld. He is clearly not getting much love and support from his team unlike what Robert had last year and yet is out performing his teammate week in week out. Trulli should be replaced as he simply looks like he is making up the numbers but I do agree that Team Lotus have been disapointing this year. Jamie likewise should go as Toro Rosso needs a bit of spark put in them to fire them up again like what Vettel did with them.

    1. PNWBrit says:

      Week in week out?

      What?

    2. Robert says:

      When you say outperforming his teammate (Petrov) week in and week out, do you really mean, he is struggling to match his teammate? Only 2 points separate the two drivers, but, Petrov is the driver who has more.

    3. Trent says:

      I agree, the public comments about them ‘missing Robert’ would be hard to take as one of the incumbent drivers.

      To me that kind of lack of support is a poor tactic by team managers – Williams did the same thing with Hill and Frentzen and I’m sure it was to the detriment of the overall results.

      Would love to see a piece on driver psychology. Do they have much external help in this area? The confidence thing must be so critical in F1, just like tennis or golf.

      1. Max Smoot says:

        I agree…some comments from sports psychologists would be useful here since many of these drivers are clearly underperforming in cars that appear to have enormous potential. Heidfeld, in particular, should be further up the running order. The same could be said of Massa, Sutil and possibly Webber.

      2. Jason C says:

        This is a VERY interesting area, I think and I’d really like to see something about it. I get the impression that there isn’t a lot of psychology employed in motorsport, but I’d be happy to hear otherwise.

        Some drivers definitely seem to need ‘stroking’ or whatever you’d like to call it – I’m thinking of Barichello, Fisichella, Massa, Trulli, Frenzen, you get the picture. Others seem not to need it at all: Raikkonen, Alonso, Kubica.

        I feel it’s a shame that we might have been robbed of some great achievements because of a lack of psychological support, but then you could say that being under pressure is an intrinsic part of performing at the top of F1.

    4. Dave Myers says:

      TO be fair to Lotus, they’re now routinely less than a second behind the slowest ‘established teams’ car in qualifying (without the benefit of KERS) and lap the Virgins and Hispanias under normal conditions now. They’re chipping away and, given the reliability of the cars these days, are probably getting the results they would expect. If the rules still allowed unlimited engines and gearboxes (meaning reliability across the grid would be lower), they would more than likely have had a few points finishes by now. You have to assess performance on a relative basis, not just by points.

    5. Steven says:

      How do you know hes not getting support, it would be stupid for the team to not support its current fastes driver. The problem with Heidfell is that with his level of expirience he was expected to do much better than he has. He seems to have a really good race followed by 2-3 really crappy ones. While I do respect him, I say give Bruno a shot at a couple of races, lets see what he can do with a car that just above mid-field. Renault really has nothing to lose, and, who knows, maybe the discover a gem, I dont think Bruno(or anybody) was able to show their true quality on an HRT

  9. PeteM says:

    I think its definately time Alguersuari was moved over for Ricciardo.
    Sometimes Im sure a team must understand that in the end results may infact bring the team more money than what a driver may bring.
    Practise and Qualifying will be interesting with more pressure again on Alguersuari. In Canada it was definately showing.

    1. Simon says:

      I’m expecting Alguersuari to get a bout of ‘stomach flu’ in 3 … 2 …

    2. Steven says:

      Yeah, but how are you sure that Ricci will bring results? Its a gamble

      1. PeteM says:

        Yep its a gamble but the guys definately got talent. I think its a widely known fact he is the next biggest thing.
        I dont know the contract he has but im sure there may be others that would snap him up given the chance and maybe if toro roso linger something else may arise who knows its an ever changing sport. Having said that I think he is comfortable where he is at the moment.
        Love to see him slip into Marks car.

  10. Onyx says:

    Drivers like Heidfeld,Rubens,Trulli,Buemi,Alguersuari,Sutil,Kathrkeyan and dear old Michael need to go…. There is a long list of really talented guys out there that should be in-Ricciardo,Senna,Grosjean,Wickens,Vergne,BianchiRossi,Gutierrez……

    1. lecho says:

      Grosjean already had his chance and all he was capable of was doing a mess on Spa 2009′s first lap. Speaking in overall, he was no better than Nelsinho.

  11. Trent says:

    Out of interest did anyone see Alguersuari driving the Redbull in Hong Kong on the weekend? I missed it by about half an hour (had to leave for the airport), but it looked like they were going to have a great crowd – it was 5 deep along the course several hours before the event.

    I wonder if Hong Kong might be eyeing off a night race…what a great setting that would be!

  12. Tim B says:

    That’s strange stuff from Trulli – obviously not happy, and you would imagine the team won’t be happy after hearing it.

    James, is there a general view in the paddock about how long it should take to get a young driver up to speed, or do the teams feel that drivers vary too much to put numbers on it?

  13. Adrian Newey Jr says:

    James
    It would be great in advance of the silly season to give some insight into the upcoming GP2 drivers who might be fighting for seats next season.

  14. Andrew Myers says:

    I think the two Torro Rosso drivers are fairly even.

    What I find difficult though is how you get a “form line” against other drivers, because they’ve really only ever competed against each other in F1 with the same equipment.

    Personally, I think they have both (Alguersuari and Buemi) done a good job for their team.

  15. GWD says:

    I think the problem with Alguesuari & Buemi is that neither of them have shown consistent enough performance and setup capability with their current car to build a likely seat filling role at RBR post -Webber, despite both having designs on such. RBR (or should that read Deitrich/Marko) really want a driver to bung the sister RBR Car on the podium behind their GHB (Golden Haired Boy… or should that be Golden Helmut’s Boy… lol) more often than not, thus filling in the Wins & Podiums where GHB mucks things up and still have big points going towards the WCC – this is a role they current get from Webber with some adequacy, and all indications so far is that RBR would only get that from Daniel consistently. RBR certainly don’t require a pay driver to fill their seats, and it appears Tost is far more resistant to HM’s anointed driver nepotism than Horner, allowing apparently equal grounds for both current drivers to give it their best (although we don’t hear that much out of this garage as we do RBR – James – do you have any insider info on in-team machinations for STR?).

    Ultimately A&B have had a big ole chance to learn their F1 craft and are about a year behind on where they should be in that endeavour. Either they don’t have that level in them or they don’t have the team around them to bring out that performance great team synergies so often do. My moves would be to give Ricciardo a 5 race shot at outperforming Buemi, and lend A to Team Lotus to put Trulli on the sidelines to think about his future. This move puts A on notice, as it does to Kovalainen as he gets a generational equivalent combatant to measure himself against, it puts B on notice to use his experience against DR, and in a strange twist of fate, HM goes completely insane and gets carted off in a padded van as he has a driver pairing he likes both drivers in and can’t use his [mod] mind games against that he most certainly enjoys the living guts out of doing at RBR…

  16. Mike from Medellin, Colombia says:

    Trulli should go. He is not going to move on to a better team and that Lotus seat would be put to better use showcasing some new talent.

    Kovalainen’s make the most of it attitue is what is probably making him achieve results.

    1. Stevie P says:

      I’m in complete agreement Mike; when Trulli first signed up I always figured that because Mike G worked with him at Toyota and Renault (and knows his style) he would provide a good benchmark of where the Lotus was at. However, I always thought he’d only be there for a year or two max and then they’d start to bring though a younger, more hungry driver alongside their mainstay (Heikki). Me thinks that time has come…

      I understand why Renault choose Nick, but I wouldn’t have made that decision; I’d have gone with Bruno, thus giving him a chance to develop and then if\when Robert comes back Bruno would provide competitive pressure for Vitaly.

      As for Torro Rosso, Alguersuari came in mid-season 2 years ago and hasn’t done too much of note. Same could be said of Buemi – he hasn’t set the world alight or done something spectacular (to out-drive the car), showcasing his talents… well, at least as far as I can tell they haven’t. One might find from looking at Telemetry and knowing the limitations of a car (ie, being in the team itself), that they are both doing a good job. Doesn’t really feel that way though.

      Hulk? Well, okay he won GP2… last pre-season he was being heralded as a new up-n-coming thing, he didn’t fare too well beside Rubens and then came the Brazilian Pole and everyone was talking about him – still not convinced, but I feel he’s good backup for Sutil (if he ends up being removed from his seat, for off track issues).

  17. Tom in Adelaide says:

    Jaime seems like a nice guy, and he definitely seems like he has a good head on his shoulders. I’ve read a few interviews where he has come accross very well. Is he ruthless enough for F1? Hmmm I’m not sure.

    He’s definitely had enough time to impress in the T.R. Hasn’t done much has he? But then Buemi has hardly set the world alight. If I were running T.R I’d have more of a revolving door. Buemi and Jaime would be out, Ricciardo and Hartley would be in. I thought the whole point of Torro Rosso was exposure of the Red Bull brand and grooming of young drivers. Right now the Torro Rosso cars tend to just blend in (they badly need a new livery too – the pale blue/silver of one of the Red Bull drink cans would look great).

    I think Ricciardo is F1′s next big superstar waiting in the wings (along with Bianchi). Would love to see him jump in a Spa.

    1. Tom in Adelaide says:

      Woah, just to clarify, I meant “jump in at Spa”.

      I have no interest in seeing any drivers jumping in a spa ;)

    2. declan says:

      Hartley is already out. He didn’t even make it to the revolving door.

  18. rvd says:

    Hulkenberg for Sutil makes sense to me.

  19. Johnny Mafia says:

    I reckon Daniel Ricciardo should slot straight into the STR car right away so he can gain experience for a full time tilt next year. Both Buemi & Alguersuari should move on as they had plenty time to show what they can do and neither has consistently done so. But we know that won’t happen because of behind the scenes politics as shown with Dr.’the clown’ Marko with RBR. F1 is a big business today and without financial clout it is hard for young talented drivers to get a shot at F1. I reckon Ricciardo in a few years can match and beat over-rated Vettel with pure race pace and race craft, as shown Vettel only wins when he starts from pole and doesn’t have to overtake or defend positions….

  20. Justin says:

    When did F1 last get a new driver that was not a pay driver, in fact are there any new drivers this year that are not pay drivers?

    Ho is F1 ever going to find the next Alonso/Hamilton/Vettel/Button/Schumacher if the only resource pool they use is from the Forbes rich list?

    Well I suppose at least Vijay Mallya has the right idea, but I do worry that F1 is seriously degrading its quality and reputation with short sited greed

    1. Adrian Jordan says:

      You do realise that both Alonso and Schumacher were effectively pay-drivers when they first entered the sport, don’t you?

    2. IJ says:

      …this is why credit where credit is due. Vijay gave Paul DiResta a chance, when I’m sure he had other options, and also after having to settle Luizzi’s contract!

      1. Stevie P says:

        That’s a very, very, very good point IJ; Vijay does seem to have chosen DiResta on his ability alone (and not through\via “financial incentives”) – which pleases me.

        However, I do feel the hand of Mercedes in the background: “we believe in Paul, go on, take him on… we’ll drop the price of our engines (just a tad) for you”. That way Merc GP get young Paul groomed for F1 and have a replacement (with some experience) for when Schumi calls it a day (again).

      2. Andy C says:

        Far be it from me to be relatively sceptical, but as Paul has been on a factory Mercedes contract for some time, I imagine the way was smoothed.

        I think he has genuine talent (shown before he went into tintops) and he is there on merit.

        I dont see anything wrong with manufacturers backing drivers personally. If they’re good enough it gives them a chance to show it, if they’re not, they dont last anyway.

  21. Werewolf says:

    To join in the fun, my thoughts are as follows:
    Toro Rosso: To be honest, neither current driver really impresses me. Buemi is probably the safer bet currently but I really see him as another Heidfeld or Sutil type. Alguersari’s opportunity came too soon and he lacks depth but there is definite flare. I think I would definitely give the undoubtedly promising Ricciardo an opportunity with the aim of reversing his and Alguersari’s roles next year, putting the pressure on Buemi to perform. Helmut Marko, methinks, has too much influence.

    Lotus: I like Trulli but that’s probably more a personality than a driver thing these days and I would miss him. That said, his F1 career is undoubtedly in terminal decline, sadly without ever having achieved its full potential, and it is indeed time to bow out. The new Le Mans WC or DTM would be good berths. So, for me, giving Chandhok the opportunity is a no-brainer.

    I think Chandhok is underrated. His junior career was anonymous but his performances compared to Senna’s in the horrible Hispania last year showed, I thought, considerable promise. His demeanour also makes him eminently media/sponsor-friendly.

    Ferrari: Massa needs to move out for the good of both parties. A re-invention of himself elsewhere could – and should – revitalise his career.

    Force India: I replied to another comment above. Hulkenberg and Di Resta would, in my opinion, give the team an embarrasment of riches it doesn’t, frankly, really deserve.

  22. DaveF says:

    F1 has always been a rich man’s game so pay drivers are just the modern equivalent. You’ve always needed to have money/sponsorship to work through the ranks from karting into the junior formulas and then Formula 3/F3000/GP2.

    As good as Stirling Moss, Jackie Stewart, James Hunt, Senna, Schumacher, Alonso (to name just some) were/are without money they would not have made it to F1.

    That said at least they were paid salaries when they got to F1. It is hard for F1 to claim to be the pinnacle of motor sport and have the best drivers when many of the drivers are only there through having more money than others. Although it is difficult to compare across categories there are probably drivers in rallying and other motor sports who are better than F1 drivers. Not to mention the ones who could have been good but never got the backing at junior level.

  23. ACB says:

    STR was supposed to be a Jr. team with the goal of developing new drivers. With the exception of Vettel this team does not seem to do young drivers much good. They struggle for a year or so and then leave or move several steps down the food chain. Alguersuari has shown glimmers of brilliance, but has not gotten the results of his team-mate. I’m sure he’s a nice kid, but since he didn’t have any problem with Sebastian Bourdais being told his services were no longer required to make room for him; so he should have no problem doing the same for Daniel Ricciardo.

  24. RickeeBoy says:

    One of the main abilities of the new kids is the abilities to know and use and be able to heat them up quick and do a quali and understand tyres.
    K. K. Made it just waiting for a good team seat – needs to push for better overall results.
    S. Perez. Good rookie year –
    Paul Di R – Understands turning tyres on and was on controlled throttle slides in damp Germany – The kid has it cracked – Just needs time to progress. ( SP or PdR for Rookie of the year …. PdR )
    Adrian S. – Just seems lacklustre – needs to watch for his seat.
    Hulk – Methinks he’s done enough for a seat next year on a low wage. ( Methinks he has the necessaries but only a year with a medium team will tell )
    Algu and Buemi – neither has impressed
    Trulli – Needs to go
    Barrichello – 2009 and last year had fire and knowledge – I think he still has it – I dont think he’d be that much slower than Webber so I think he’d still be a good buy if you are buying as opposed to wanting money.
    Maldanado makes the tyres work in Quali and that races like a Dick – I dont understand it.

    Would be good to see both Sauber and F India beating Renault as they deserve it now.

  25. Evel says:

    Alguersuari is really showing potential of late and deserves more chance to develop. If Toro Rosso drops anyone it should be Buemi who has long enough but has never shone.
    As for the earlier comment about Sutil I think his recent form and domination over Di Resta in the last few races has proven his critics wrong.
    He has served the team well, beating all of his previous team mates comfortably. Di Resta could just be a really special driver and a future WDC – let’s not forget he beat Vettel to the 2006 F3 Euroseries title. Sutil should not just be forgotten about so quickly and should by no means be dumped by the team based only on a few previous bad performances which seem to be out of the ordinary for him.

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