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F1 in Schools gains an important patron: Martin Whitmarsh
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F1 in Schools gains an important patron: Martin Whitmarsh
Posted By: James Allen  |  06 Jan 2011   |  4:17 pm GMT  |  9 comments

F1 in Schools, the engineering challenge for school age children, has gained an important new patron in the form of McLaren team principal Martin Whitmarsh.

He joins Ross Brawn, Mike Gascoyne, Sam Michael, Adrian Newey, Pat Symonds and other figures from the sport who have agreed to be patrons. F1 in Schools is a not-for profit organisation, which runs an annual challenge in over 30 countries with a world final every year. Last year it was in Singapore, the year before that in the UK. I have been a patron since the challenge started almost a decade ago and also host the world finals presentation each year.


Whitmarsh’s involvement follows on from Lewis Hamilton’s appearance at the 2009 finals in London and it is the first time a representative of McLaren has engaged with the challenge as a patron. The children have to design, build and race CO2-powered miniature racing cars out of balsa wood using CAD/CAM ( computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies.) They also have to find sponsorship and give presentations to the judges. At last year’s world finals the senior judge was ex Jordan technical director Gary Anderson. The winning team came from the USA.

Whitmarsh said, “This educational initiative is a great way to encourage students to study key subjects within the curriculum, while also introducing new fans to Formula 1. We are always considering the long-term future of our sport and with initiatives such as F1 in Schools, we are assured that there will be plenty of bright, young talent looking to enter the industry,” said Martin.

“We met a number of the students after the 2009 World Finals in London, when the winning team was given a tour of the McLaren Technology Centre. The students’ knowledge of the sport and their depth of engineering understanding were very impressive, so we know that F1 in Schools is playing an important role in preparing students for further education and, ultimately, careers in industry. I am sure we will see F1 in Schools ‘alumni’ in Formula 1, and possibly Vodafone McLaren Mercedes, in the not too distant future.”


Bernie Ecclestone has backed F1 in Schools for several years now, giving the Bernie Ecclestone Trophy to the world champions each year. He realises the appeal of the challenge is to take F1 into the classroom, attracting a whole new audience to the sport in the key demographic of under 18s, which are otherwise hard to reach.

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9 Comments
  1. Must be quite exciting for the kids – train them while they’re young!

  2. Sean cleary says:

    Good to see this continuing to grow!

  3. build says:

    G’day James,
    My son went through that program a few years back and it was excellent. There is so much more to it than just designing the car. Perhaps you could explain that.

    I was tempted to help out but restrained my enthusiasm. However when it got to state level it became obvious that others had not restrained. Which I found disappointing.

    Regardless I think the interviews strained out the mob and exposed those rare kids who I are no doubt are destined for great things. Some of them really impressed me, one reminded me of a bloke, Malcolm Oastler when he was young. I have no doubt we’ll some of them in F1.

    I’d also suggest it may be time for a change of rules, some new ideas.

    best regards,

    1. James Allen says:

      Thanks for that. I have passed your comments on to the organisers of F1 in Schools

      1. build says:

        James,
        I should have mentioned that my son now works for VW thanks to a person he met through F1 in schools. He gets to play with some fantastic toys and thinks 12 hour days are great because it’s just more fun than 8 hours. Like my son another team member also has subsidised schooling through a sponsor of the team. So one of the *many* skills they learn is the value of networking. I can’t praise the scheme highly enough.

  4. Brian Armitage says:

    If F1 in Schools was about when I was younger then I might be an engineer today instead of a hop farmer in the Pyrenees!

    1. James Allen says:

      I love the Pyrenees, what part are you in?

    2. Mario says:

      OMG! I’d love to be a farmer in the Pyrenees! I was there once, outstandingly beautiful and peaceful place. And the air in the part by the ocean is just unforgettably refreshing!

    3. build says:

      Brian,
      I’m jealous of your locale too :-)

      Perhaps you can put your kids through the program? It’s not just for engineers, any kid can gain many valuable skills from it. One kid on my sons team ended up in Marketing (subsidised education too).

      If your school does not run the program go the website and grab the kit, it gives you all the tools to sell it to the school, I’m sure they will be very interested.

      regards

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