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Alonso wins Singapore GP, as Webber and Hamilton tangle
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Alonso wins Singapore GP, as Webber and Hamilton tangle
Posted By: James Allen  |  26 Sep 2010   |  3:44 pm GMT  |  195 comments

Fernando Alonso won the Singapore Grand Prix by a margin of just 0.2 seconds after a race long battle with Sebastian Vettel on a day when the gloves well and truly came off between championship rivals Mark Webber and Lewis Hamilton.

The pair, who were one and two in the championship going into the race, were fighting for third place when they collided following a restart from a safety car period.

It was Alonso’s 25th career victory, putting him level with the great Jim Clark and only two behind Jackie Stewart. More significantly it was his third win in five races and the momentum is definitely with him now in the championship. He lies just 11 points behind Mark Webber, who finished third today.

Three wins in five races put Alonso right back in the hunt (Ferrari)


Alonso defended very robustly at the start, possibly paying Vettel back for a similar move in Germany. Vettel slotted into second place, ahead of Hamilton and Button.

Further back Liuzzi and Heidfeld made contact and that damaged Liuzzi’s car. He stopped out on track causing the race director to send out the safety car. This brought in most of the cars from 12th place downwards, but it also brought in championship leader Mark Webber. This was a brave gamble by Red Bull, where arguably there was no need to gamble.

It put Webber into another race like Hungary, where he was on a different strategy to the rest of the field. The difference was that in Hungary the Red Bull had a big performance advantage, here it did not.

The aim was to try to jump both McLarens, but it required Webber to pass the slower cars in front of him, like Glock, Kobayashi, Schumacher and Barrichello to stay close enough to the leaders to make it work. He also had to do 57 laps on a set of tyres. He admitted afterwards that he questioned the team about the decision and wondered at times whether it would come off.

The safety car came in on lap 7 and by lap 10 Webber was past Glock and Kobayashi but already 14 seconds behind the leader, lapping two seconds slower. He passed Schumacher on lap 10 for eighth place.

At the front Alonso opened up a lead over Vettel, at a consistent 3/10ths of a second per lap. Vettel didn’t seem able to respond, apart from one lap where he took a tenth out of Alonso. But the gap continued to grow to the McLarens who were a second a lap slower in the opening stint. After a promising qualifying session, where Hamilton had been just a tenth off the Red Bull, this was a disappointing showing on full tanks.

Webber got caught behind Barrichello and this stopped his progress. As the McLarens toiled on the tyres, Hamilton was in range for Webber once the stops kicked in. Hamilton blinked on lap 29 and when he rejoined he was behind Webber.

Lap 30 saw the two leaders in, Vettel had closed up on Alonso, but there was nothing to be done in the stops, Vettel had a poor getaway, but it wouldn’t have made a difference anyway.

Button pitted on the same lap and duly fell behind Webber as well.

On lap 32 Kobayashi crashed at Turn 18 and Senna hit him, forcing another safety car. Kubica and Barrichello pitted and that took Webber up to the third place his early strategy gamble was aimed to achieve. Even better, the safety car meant he was right on his team mate’s gearbox.

At the restart Hamilton attacked Webber, as they came up to one of the Virgin cars. Webber lost momentum getting past and this allowed Hamilton alongside on the outer line.

Webber defended the inside line into Turn 8 and as Hamilton turned across him, they collided, putting Hamilton out of the race. It was his fourth retirement of the season and the second in a row due to contact with another car when trying to pass, something he has usually been sure footed on.

The stewards, guided by driver steward Danny Sullivan, decided that no further action should be taken. Part of the reason for that is because the aggrieved party, Hamilton, was on the outside of the corner, which is always harder to judge blame on than an inside pass.

“He had to have a go. Lewis was a bit ahead, but it was similar to the last race with Felipe,” said Webber. “This can happen sometimes, we brake on the limit, it was incredibly tight and we hit hard, possibly enough to put both of us out of the race.”

Hamilton was understandably gutted by his second accident in as many races, “I saw Mark made a mistake and got caught by a backmarker so I knew I could slipstream him into Turn Seven and I thought I was enough past him, ” he said. “I couldn’t see him and turned in and left enough room and the next thing I know I got hit. I don’t know what happened. I’ll have to watch it on TV and see what really happened. Twenty points is massive and with four races to go that is a big gap, I have to get my head down and hope for something.”

In the second phase of the race, on the hard tyres, Vettel was faster than Alonso and closed to just a second. Button was also faster than Webber, but didn’t try an attack.

Kubica pitted for a second time due to a suspected puncture. On new tyres, he scythed past the cars who were struggling on old tyres, passing Petrov and Massa.

Sullivan and the stewards were also called into action to judge a collision between Schumacher and Heidfeld – again they decided that no further action was needed.

Towards the end there was a spectacular fire for Heikki Kovalainen’s Lotus, which robbed him of a 13th place which could have secured their position ahead of Virgin in the new teams’ championship battle.

Alonso is now second in the championship, he has scored the most points of any driver in the last five races,
“Anything can happen” he said. “One of us can win two or three consecutive races or you can retire and it puts you out of the championship. We can say that now I am in my peak, 100% of my motivation and concentration. It feels like the championship starts now and I’m very happy to go to Japan.”

SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX, 61 Laps
1. Alonso Ferrari 1h57:53.579
2. Vettel Red Bull-Renault + 0.293
3. Webber Red Bull-Renault + 29.141
4. Button McLaren-Mercedes + 30.384
5. Rosberg Mercedes + 49.394
6. Barrichello Williams-Cosworth + 56.101
7. Kubica Renault + 1:26.559
8. Sutil Force India-Mercedes + 1:52.416
9. Hulkenberg Williams-Cosworth + 1:52.791
10. Massa Ferrari + 1:53.297
11. Petrov Renault + 1 lap
12. Alguersuari Toro Rosso-Ferrari + 1 lap
13. Schumacher Mercedes + 1 lap
14. Buemi Toro Rosso-Ferrari + 1 lap
15. Di Grassi Virgin-Cosworth + 2 laps
16. Kovalainen Lotus-Cosworth + 3 laps

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195 Comments
  1. Jason C says:

    I thought that the stewards got the call right between Webber and Hamilton: a racing incident, but imo more Hamilton’s fault than Webber’s.

    But I think they made the wrong call re Heidfeld and Schumacher: I think Heidfeld was to blame there, though i’d like to see a few replays.

    1. Darren says:

      Yeah, agree with the Webber / Hamilton. Hamilton should have ran a little wider (as Kubica did later in the race) and he would have probably got him.

      The onus should be on the guy doing the overtaking to make sure its clean, Webber was under no obligation to dive out of the way he picked his line stuck to it and turned in as normal. Racing incident, blame lies more with Hamilton but to penalise either of them would have been very unfair. Good call by the stewards, a couple of seasons ago things would have probably been different.

      1. JimmiC says:

        Kubica showed how it should’ve been done on Sutil. He gave him that extra few centimetres of room and it was the difference between Kubica getting another puncture from Sutil’s front wing or making an amazing pass.

      2. CH1UNDA says:

        Doesn’t matter now. Its all over and done with and now McLaren and Lewis ought to move on to 2011 – they dont have a chance this year and IMHO they would be wasting money developing for the 2010 titles.

      3. GaryR says:

        Rather, I think the difference with Kubica’s pass on Sutil was that Sutil hit the brakes to aviod hitting Kubica.

        Weber decided to not give Hamilton room, and was incredibly lucky that the impact didn’t put him out too. But that was the gamble …

        I love to see close racing, Hamilton would have been mad to not try the overtake given what a toy circuit it is, and Weber made his choice. It’s moments of luck in the outcome of incidents like these that can make all the difference in a championship – and I salute both of them for risking all.

      4. irishanders says:

        yeah i agree, rewatching both incidents and kubica took an identical line to Lewis, only difference is the FIndia clearly yielded. IMO I would put blame 80% webber 20% Ham. Webber shouldve known after being offline his tyres were dusty and going in so hot on such a sharp line would result in contact. Despite being on the outside given how far he was ahead it was Ham’s corner IMO but he couldve and shouldve given more room to avoid any risk of contact (I wonder if he would have done if it was against MSC or Kobyashi!). very unlucky to have been put out tho at the same time, that McLaren seems rather fragile (after Monza as well) but im guessing its just bad luck with what angle & what section of the McLaren the contact was made in both Monza and Singapore

      5. Over here in the ‘Colonies’ the transmission we saw (and taped) showed Weber on the curb and very close to the wall with Hamilton cutting accross his bow too soon. He caused the contact and had plenty of room to the outside of the corner as it looked. The overtaking driver is responsible for the safety of a pass when we race in this part of the world. And that goes for the ‘Shoemaker’ incident as well – he simply goes on crashing into others with not a care in the world. At least J.V. gave him some of his own medicine when he had the chance. It didn’t cure the problem for long, though.

    2. Aey says:

      In this case of the contact today, What Lewis or Heidfeld did wrong. Could you explained it ?

    3. James Draper says:

      I think that if you watch the replay you will see webber brake late and hit Hamilton who was ahead and on the racing line.

      1. Mark V says:

        Yes we’ve seen the replay and the stewards got it right. While Hamilton had a nose ahead, that does not automatically constitute a pass, the burden of proof is to make it stick without causing an accident. Webber had every right to be where he was.

      2. John Bell says:

        But Hamilton left enough room for Webber and Webber overshot and thereby hit Hamilton which was Webber’s fault and a pitty really. I love to see passes and Hamilton has the courage and the skill to keep attempting it and Webber should have been more cautious.

      3. Paul says:

        I agree it was a racing incident but I think Hamilton was more than a “nose” ahead. I also think Hamilton left a fair bit of room on the inside for Webber and as such did everything he could to avoid contact.

        I think the crash happened because Webber came into the corner so straight. He was very much on the left hand side of the track so it was pretty much a case of driving straight to the corner than then trying to turn it in once he got to the apex.

        I think if Webber had drifted right a bit before the corner and taken a more curved line through the apex they both may have made it.

        I’m not suggesting that Webber did anything wrong though. It was just close racing that got too close.

      4. Steven says:

        He had every right to be where he was, but he had no right to hit Hamilton.

      5. Mark V says:

        Hey I didn’t say it was Hamilton’s fault. However, had he not tried to pass on the outside and then putting his car on the racing line which Webber was justified in defending, there would have been no collision. Like I said, the burden of proof is on the passer. As Brundle pointed, it was wishful thinking to hope Webber could stop on a dime or disappear as soon as Lewis appeared. Racing incident.

      6. Robert says:

        Vettel lost control of his car in Spa, putting him into the side of Button and the stewards served Vettel with a drive-thru. Webber is involved in an accident where he was easily at fault and gets handed nothing. Hamilton had the lead going into the corner, had the line through the corner and Webber simply drive too deep into the corner with the hopes of bumping Hamilton out of the way. That is how Webber drives! He should’ve been given a drive-thru penalty.

      7. Mark V says:

        Robert, do you really think those two incidents are similar? If so, there is no point debating. This is no Schumacher vs. Villeneuve deliberate ramming. It’s a pity Hamilton’s championship bid took such a blow, but he really should have been more careful to make d***ed sure such an incident couldn’t happen.

      8. Jeff Cranmer says:

        I agree with Robert.
        Lewis had the corner. Mark had no chance to regain his position without hitting Lewis. The very fact that Mark’s front wheel hit Lewis’ rear wheel at the apex of the corner points the blame squarely in the Red Bull’s seat.

        I hope that giving the post of driver steward to someone with only one very unsuccessful year of F1 experience, and with previous involvement in the Red Bull driver search program to find an American driver to compete in F1 didn’t influence the decision in any way.

      9. Mark V says:

        “I hope that giving the post of driver steward to someone with only one very unsuccessful year of F1 experience, and with previous involvement in the Red Bull driver search program to find an American driver to compete in F1 didn’t influence the decision in any way.”

        Why give the job to anyone with racing experience when there are so many experts on the internet more than qualified for the job? :P

  2. Kenny says:

    Another good result for Webber. A win or two in the final 4 races would be good!

    1. RickeeBoy says:

      He been racing for points only since Spa – and good luck to him – While Fernando and Seb went at it tooth and nail – Mark just wants the points – Still feel things will come to him as he’s also waiting for himself and car to feel good at the right track – then he can push a bit more – He’s still got the lead over Fernando plus Fernando’s engines are getting long in the tooth – Should be a good fight but still see him taking it with his steely resolve – Although with Fernando there he’s going to start fighting more. It just keeps getting better. !!!

  3. David Hamilton says:

    This leaves Michael Schumacher 76 points behind Rosberg, making him the second-most heavily beaten teammate in F1 (Petrov, in his rookie season is 95 points behind Kubica).

    I’m sure I heard Michael himself say in an interview that these results are damaging his career statistics. When is he going to stop humiliating himself and call it a day?

    1. James Allen says:

      Thanks for pointing that out. Who’s going to tell Michael?

      1. Kev says:

        I don’t think he needs any telling. He has been in a car that is not suited to his driving and he is not able to adapt as much as he does during his dominant years.

        But if he quits now, it would do more damage than any good. Now that he has already earned the tag of a slow coach, it will not matter much if he is the same next year.

        But if the car that MercGP launches next year is suited to his style along with Pirelli tires, he will make a strong contender for race wins.

        And please remember we are talking about Michael, the legend! He is not just an another driver to call it quit after a season of mediocrity.

        James, if you will be able to talk to Schumi, please mention that there are a millions here who would like to see him race next year. It will be very disappointing for us if he quits this year.

      2. James Allen says:

        I do not think he will quit next year – all the signals from him and his people are that he wants to race. Strangely it’s almost like he has something to prove!

      3. Mojo66 says:

        I don’t wanna start a disussion about Schu but honestly, I don’t think that he’s a legend. He has won 7 titles, ok, but in my opinion, to be a legend he lacks sportsmanship. I wouldn’t consider Senna a legend, for the same reason. In fact both drivers have a similar record of purposely crashing into their opponent for the sake of the title win. I’d consider Prost, Lauda, Hakkinnen and Mansell legends, because they were both great drivers and great sportsman.

      4. Aey says:

        I don’t think that Mecedes is happy with Schu Performance. They just have nothing to say out , but as a boss, who can be happy with what he get from 7 WDC

        I consider Schu as one of the worse driver on grid right now, even compare with the Rookie standard.

        When someone say the car is not suit the driver style, when the rookie not perform well, can they excuse that the car is not match him, sure they can’t. Why the 7 WDC can excuse the thing that actually with his experience he should adapt to car better than he is doing now. Can Petrov make an excuse that Renault has made for Kubica, that why he can’t perform so well as kubica.

        Moreover, When there are the battle between Schu and other one, I rated him very poor and unfair. Not talk about the past, only this year how many time Schu do some bad defend. . . a lot.

        Today when he hit Nick, that is not defend move, it just stupid move that he know he have nothing to defend anyway but he not try to avoid just keep going and hit someone instead.

        Poor Micheal. I think that Mercedes already know that they just made the very wrong decision to bring him back. I think they now consider how to let Micheal quit for next year. MB is knowing now with Micheal, there is hopeless.

        sorry, My english is not good.

      5. mo kahn says:

        He (Schuey) is rather bemused by tires. If Pirelli works the way he wants and gets his one lap hurdle sorted.. I think he’ll be unbeatable.

      6. Nick says:

        @Mojo66 I would just like to point out for the record, that Prost did intentionally crash into Senna in order to put him out of the race … I have to say I think you are right with regards to Schumacher … but Senna, I have not seen another driver stop his car and get out to see if another driver was injured after a big accident like Senna did. if that’s not sportsmanship I don’t know what is

      7. Tim. says:

        I will…. :)
        Be more then happy to.

    2. Rafael says:

      I was never Schumi’s biggest fan, but I would sure like to see him carry on next year. I think this year is shades of 2005, when he and Bridgestone were struggling with the no-tyre stop rule, but then bounced back strongly the following year, 2006. I have quite a positive feeling of him being back on top next year and his constant detractors – like EJ and sir JYS – probably eating their words… or rather coming up again with another set of ridiculous excuses to undermine the 7x World Champ’s return to form.

      If we look at it, all F1 returnees this year have struggled compared to their team-mates, even Felipe Massa (with the exception of Christian Klien, but I personally think that his return just highlights Bruno Senna’s lack of pace). It takes time to build up to that competitive F1 speed again, and I think the no. 1 culprit from hindering returning drivers from rediscovering this is the ban on in-season testing. I personally think that rule is stupid, as more than anything test days actually are practice-training days; what kind of sport prohibits its athletes from practicing-training in between events/fights???

      1. David Hamilton says:

        I think F1 has been brilliant since the testing ban. The big teams used to use their budgets to crush the opposition through a huge amount of testing, which is one reason why Schumacher managed to be so dominant. Limiting testing has definitely evened things up. It is too simplistic to say that Schumacher/Ferrari bought those WDCs, but I’m certain their dominance would have been less crushing with more limited testing.

        The other positive that have come from the test ban is that, as teams are not being able to test on circuits prior to races, they are having to make more guesses and take risks with setups. This leads to more interesting and unpredictable races.

        Also, fans get to see the cars more on the Friday, as that’s the only time teams get to test.

      2. James Allen says:

        Interesting point, thanks

  4. Mojo66 says:

    Great driving from both Fernando and Seb, they were in their own league today. Lots of flexing wings, however.

    I don’t understand two things, first, when the SC was on track for the first time, lots of backmarkers came in for tires, but they all re-entered the race in front of Massa. Was he just extremely slow on the prime tires or did he have a mishap?

    The next thing I don’t understand is, why did RB call in Seb at the same time as Alonso came in?? He was obviously quicker than Alonso, so why not keep him out for a few more laps?

    Hamilton again taking a risk and losing. Does he feel the pressure to live up to his reputation of being a regular overtaker? A few laps later at the same spot a similar accident between Schu and Heidfeld. I wonder why both Hamilton and Heidfeld took a rather tight line instead of running a bit wide, because the next corner would have been a right-hander so they would have had an advantage there to secure their position. Later in the race, Kubica passed Sutil there without incident.

    1. Galapago555 says:

      “The next thing I don’t understand is, why did RB call in Seb at the same time as Alonso came in??”

      Very interesting point. Neither I understood why was Vettel pitting and not trying to get a couple of flying laps before changing tyres. In fact, I expected RB to make the same strategy as Ferrari did in Monza, that worked ok, can I add.

      So, maybe Seb’s soft tyres were too damaged by that moment and so he had to pit on the same lap as Fernando?

      1. devilsadvocate says:

        in his post race interview Seb noted that he was skating around a bit on his worn out soft tires. Redbull was probably trying to wait and see if Alonso blinked early to try and hammer out a couple hotlaps, but Ferrari ran him long so they ended up having to shadow him in and not risk losing any ground to those further back.

        Ferrari came out swinging this weekend and was a more than well deserved result for Fernando. Vettel seems to have lit a fire as well. Lets hope he doesn’t lose his cool as he gets closer to the top, as it will make for one heck of a close to the season.

    2. Mojo66 says:

      Please excuse me answering my own question. In a post-race interview Seb being asked exactly the same question, he answered that he was much quicker on fresh primes than on the worn options, which would have made it impossible to gain on an already pitted Alonso.

      Well, if that’s the case, then maybe RB passed the point where the options degrade so much that they are slower than the primes, and should have pitted earlier? Oh well, nothing beats the benfit of hindsight ;-)

    3. Brent says:

      I think it was Red Bull that decided to pit first, that’s why we saw the Ferrari mechanic running out with the tire.

    4. Andrad F. says:

      Answer for the first thing.
      Massa had too much gap after his stop to jump more cars during the first SC period. He still gained some position as he was in P15 after SC.
      If I remember well he had a very good pace on the new tyres making some magenta coloured sector time when he had free space in front of him.

    5. Martin says:

      The key with safety cars is to pit before there is anything that compresses the field.

      To stop cars racing through an accident at full speed to beat cars doing what Massa did, there are target times that should be exceeded.

      In Valencia, Webber collided with Kovalainen at the end of the second sector and ended up in the third track sector. This meant the whole field had to drive through the accident zone and drive slower than a target time.

      With Massa, what could have happened is that having dropped 30 seconds, he could have had to drive through the sector at the required lack of speed, where possibly the guys yet to stop did not.

      Another thing to consider with safety cars is tyre performance immediately out of the pits. In series without tyre warmers stopping before the yellow is almost always a killer as the out laps are slow (and on short ovals laps are lost). In Formula 1, new tyre grip can be an advantage, but with the wonders of aerodynamics, even though the car is heavy with full fuel, the slower corner speeds mean there is less load on the tyres (force = mass * velocity^2/corner radius), so they don’t necessarily turn on. Massa would probably have been going gently as he knew that he needed his tyres to last 60 laps.

  5. Peter Abatan says:

    Could Webber win the championship? Yes I think so. Webber realizes that when the race does not come to him all he needs to do is get as much points as possible to stay in the hunt.

    Alonso’s race was fab! He knows how to handle the pressure. At this stage I think the championship is between him i.e. Alonso and Webber.

    However, Webber will be highly favoured to win if the Korean GP does not happen.

    Great race!

  6. ernst says:

    great reca from alonso after a great qualification performance. Also this was the first chelem(lead the race from start to finish, pole, fastest lap and race win) for Alonso, a well deserved one. I think he once again showed why he is belong to very few top class F1 pilots of all times.

  7. PaulL says:

    I’m an Alonso fan, but I felt pretty flat after that event.

    The race for the lead amounted to nothing more than another one-stop-then-follow-the-leader procession for a full two hours.

    This could have been better had the drivers had the chance to race according to their fuel strategy – but alas, intrigue and mystery are consigned to history. We don’t need that here anymore.

    1. artorwar says:

      I miss refueling as well, but I don’t think this was a dull race. Ok so the P1 didn’t change hands but 2 drivers raced to the absolute limit. The fact that neither cracked (with the exception of Sebs slight cock up re leaving the box in 2nd) shows just how great a display we got to watch.

      1. Laurence H says:

        I think that drivers got lazy in the refueling days. Why try an overtake when you can wait for the pitstop. Without this, I think drivers now have no option but to pass on the track, and are now trying moves that they wouldn’t have tried last year. I think this has contributed significantly to the excitement of this season.

    2. Ikertzeke says:

      You only need two type of tyres: fast and superfast, making the superfast 2-3 seconds faster and … Eureka!

  8. jonrob says:

    Vettel nearly caught Alonso on the last lap, he may have forced him into a mistake, and won.
    The race went over 2 hours, in fact the last lap started after 2 hours was up, this is technically illegal. Had the result been altered on the last lap the result could be in serious dispute.

    1. Nesto says:

      I’m not even sure why theres a so-called time limit and I’m pretty sure I’ve seen a few races go over 2 hours before. But the results show that Alonso finished the race in 1h57:53.579

      or does it not account for time behind safety cars and such ?

      1. Galapago555 says:

        I’m not sure there has ever been a F1 race that lasted more that two hours – but I don’t think so.

        Anyway, I’m pretty sure there is a time limit. You can read it in the regulations:

        Article 5.3) states that:
        “5.3 The distance of all races, from the start signal referred to in Article 38.9 to the chequered flag, shall be equal to the least number of complete laps which exceed a distance of 305 km (Monaco 260km). However, should two hours elapse before the scheduled race distance is completed, the leader will be shown the chequered flag when he crosses the control line (the Line) at the end of the lap during which the two hour
        period ended. However, should the race be suspended (see Article 41) the length of the suspension will be added to this period.”

        I think that the time behind safety cars counts. Only red flag periods don’t count, if the race re-starts.

      2. Martin says:

        Re two hour races, Adelaide in 1989 was stopped after 70 laps out of 81 and 2:00.17. Fuji 2007 is another example.

        From 1950 to 1957 the races were up to 500 km in length (ignoring the Indy 500). The 1954 German GP was won by Fangio in 3:45.45.8 but with the lap length, Mantovani who came in fifth took 3:54.35.3 to finish the 22nd lap. There were a couple of Indy 500s that exceeded Mantovani, but none went over 4 hours for the winner.

      3. Dominic J says:

        The clock starts when the 5 red lights go out, which is about 3 minutes after the warm-up lap begins on the hour (if you follow). Therefore whilst the last lap started at 22:00 local time (15:00 UK) that doesn’t mean the 2 hours were up. Easy mistake to make, it took me a while to figure out myself.

  9. James, do you know why Red Bull and Ferrari pitted on the same lap? I was expecting Vettel to stay out one more lap and try to get past Alonso… What gives?

    Awesome race.

    1. jon says:

      red bull and ferrari both responded to the maclaren pit stop………why i dont know cos thay were so far in front……….

      1. Ikertzeke says:

        SC danger for Fernando and Seb.

      2. Jaco says:

        Yeah that’s what the commentators said, but it doesn’t make sense. They were still pulling away at that stage..

      3. CH1UNDA says:

        That just cant be true – McLaren are racing in the best of the rest category – why would the front runners strategise around them? As a McLaren fan its dissappointing to loose the championship so early. I hope 2011 turns out better.

      4. Pargo says:

        I wouldn’t count Mclaren out just yet. There’s still plenty of points on offer and as we can see, the ladder changes signficantly from race to race. I think it will go down to the last race for the top 4-5 drivers.

      5. Johnny Boy says:

        They wanted to emerge ahead of Lewis after the stop.

        Redbull decided to pit Vettel as soon as they had enough of a gap to Hamilton to emerge ahead of him (i.e. they didnt want to get stuck behind Hamilton until he pitted). Ferrari reacted to the Redbull decision.

  10. captainj84 says:

    did anyone see the f1 forum on bbc? jake humphreys put his i-pad down! gasp!!!!

  11. Galapago555 says:

    A fantastic race from both Fernando and Seb. It shows that sometimes you don’t need many cars overtaking to see a breath-taking race.

    For once, I think that the Stewards were right when they decided not to make any decission re incident involving Mark and Lewis.

  12. Sebeee says:

    Is Hamilton good at loosing championships or what? Even the one he “won” we could discuss at length. He really can’t handle the pressure.

    This championship fight will separate men from boys.

    Go Webber! Get it done.

    1. jon says:

      it wasent pressure that got hamilton it was a case of bad luck….lewis has made the most overtakin moves this season….as bruno senna said “if u see a gap u must go for it outher wise u r not racing”…..

    2. Cliff says:

      Interesting point, but we regularly complain that we want to see these guys race. Webber and Hamilton race and we say it’s pressure. There is an argument to say that you have to choose your moments to race, but I would rather see the drivers “going for it”. About this time last year JB was being too conservative, now we have a situation when a driver puts it on the limit and fans say thet he can’t handle the pressure.

      1. Sebeee says:

        I’m not saying it wasn’t fun to watch, I’m just saying the boy is truly good at making things hard for himself.

        There was no opening by the way. Good on him to try to force the issue. But have we not seen Webber this year clearly not yield? What was Leweis expecting here? He had the time to think about it behind the SC. Someone needs to show him the Webber 2010 tape since his character analysis was flawed, because Webber ain’t taking no BS. Ruthless, but with style and class. Really for the more mature audience with all these boy racers Webber is clearly the man in this field.

        Right after turkey I filed my application to the Webber fan club. Hope I can get in, lineup for this club is very long after this season.

      2. Timorous says:

        Hamilton was a car length ahead at the braking point and Webber out braked himself. If you compare the Kubica/Sutil overtake to this one you can see that Kubica and Hamilton are on almost the exact same line the only differences are 1. Hamilton was ahead going into the corner but Kubica was behind and 2. Sutil braked as late as he could to make the corner but avoid a collision and Webber braked too late and collided with Hamilton.

        At the time I thought it was probaly a racing incident but after watching it again I think Webber could have avoided it by braking at the correct point. He was well onto the inside of the corner and on the dirty line, he was on older tires and he braked later than Hamilton who was on the racing line with much fresher rubber. I know the Red Bull is a good car but its not that good and without Hamilton he would have overshot the exit and may well have ended up in the barrier.

    3. CH1UNDA says:

      Dont slate Lewis too much – Webber and Jenson are getting praises for good racing after a decade in F1 – Lewis has plenty of time to win championships. Technically the championship can only be won by one driver. At the end of all this, three more current contenders will be in the same situation as Hamilton – titleless.

      1. Sebeee says:

        Well, at least we know to exclude Hamilton from the 2010 list now.

    4. James Draper says:

      I think Lewis and Jensen have done well to be this close. The only race they looked dominant in this year is Montreal. Red Bull should be miles ahead by now and that Ferrari machine is catching them.

      1. Martin says:

        The McLaren was the best car as Spa too when you look at all the session times. Best engine and best F-duct covered them for the really quick corners. Hamilton messed up his first Q3 run, but his second showed a) Hamilton’s talent and b) that the McLaren was the best one-lap car at Spa.

        The McLaren’s characteristics that make it fast, such as the F-duct and the engine apply at all situations of a race, whereas the Red Bull, with its downforce advantage puts additional load through the tyres, so this has to be managed through the race, usually narrowing the advantage if used all the time. Also the blown diffuser works best in a mode that risks damaging the engine. [In some cases, such as Singapore, the McLaren hasn't had the grip to contain sliding, and there extra downforce helps.] It is why Hamilton has been able to hang on races such as Silverstone, where the qualifying gap has been much larger.

    5. Alanis Morissette says:

      Bottom line, Lewis and Jenson shouldn’t have even been behind Mark. Once again, this was utterly McLaren’s fault – both Lewis and Jenson should have been pitted when it was clear their tyres were stuffed in comparison to Vettel and Alonso’s. At that point – the win was clearly off the table – so they should have been concentrating on getting 3rd and 4th ahead of Webber.

      Instead, typically, McLaren opted for another indecisive pitstop strategy which cost both Lewis and Jenson their places behind Webber. We’ve seen numerous examples of this over the last few years – and it’s becoming very costly.

      I don’t know what’s going on, or who’s in charge of strategy during the race, but they clearly aren’t watching the same feeds as us as they are nearly always wrong leaving me baffled that they can’t see the obvious – the only headline making time it worked was when Jenson made (a very lucky) call in Oz.

  13. Ibrahim Patel says:

    Fantastic win for alonso, whos been super fast all weekend. Lights to flag win, and he really didnt seem under any real pressure even if Vettel was a bit faster.

    Theres two things i wanted to ask…firstly as to why kobayashi wasnt penalised for his crash into Schumacher (looked like a sato move to me)…he was never going to make the corner. The stewards looked into the webber/hamilton incident during the race but not this one.

    Secondly a request for you to ask fernando alonso (hopefully in the tv press conf) if he will be going to mclaren after he wins the WDC, to thank them clipping red bulls wings.

    That would be the icing on the cake for an incredible season.

    1. Baktru says:

      That wasn’t Kobayashi actually, it was Heidfeld.

      For both incidents, I think the outside driver shut the door to agressively, with the Heidfeld-Schumacher incident being closer to the limit of being a ‘Causing a collision’ error.

  14. DK says:

    James, the race finished under yellow flag the two cars finished incredibly close. What if Vettel manage to poke his nose in front of Alonso yet not passing him in full across the finish line, will this situation amount to “passing under yellow flag”??

  15. Charlie B says:

    I think the stewards decision was the right one, racing incident that’s all. Overall a good race enough action in parts and Vettel and Alonso close throughout. Looking forward to Japan, I have never seen a dull race at Suzuka.

  16. tank says:

    A well deserved Ferrari victory – outdid RBR with an arguably slightly slower car. Four to go and things are getting tense!

    Disappointed with Schu’s race as usual. If he doesn’t have the fire to prove himself anymore, it actually puts him at a disadvantage imho. Hopefully he’ll get pi**ed off enough over the last few races to go into next season in the right frame of mind.

    You called it regarding the weather this morning James, thanks for that… And kudos for asking poignant questions at the press conference.

  17. rafa says:

    Well to all those Hamilton die hards who only yesterday were dissing Alonso for his mistakes this year, claiming he was not really a good driver and so on, what Lewis himself? He´s not that mistake free himself, is he? Button is nearly at his level seeing the points each gets and that they have the same car…

    1. James Allen says:

      I don’t think you could call this a mistake, unlike the Monza one..

      1. JF says:

        Disagree, James you are wrong this time. Webber had no where to go (unless he decided to hit the wall), that was all pure misjudgement on Hamiltons part. He screwed up. Had he stayed a bit wider he may well have done it. I think Hamilton is taking the “crash kid” crown for the time being at least.

      2. RickeeBoy says:

        Wholeheartedly agree !

        So many people on here saying it’s Webber or Hamilton’s fault – Come on Guys these drivers have milliseconds to choose and Hammy thought he was in front ( because he looked like from his viewpoint ) and Mark had nowhere else to go so they touched – Give the pair of them a break please …… It was just a racing incident. Hammy will get into more problems than most as he’s trying to overtake more people on the edge ….. So Lesson for Hammy … don’t overtake anybody or race with others and you’ll not be taken out. ( reminds me of Prost actually ! ) … but actually Mark is pulling some superb moves this year as well.

      3. James Allen says:

        Agree with this post. You cannot blame Hamilton for trying and you can’t blame Webber for resisting. That’s how the stewards and most of the paddock saw it

    2. Nesto says:

      All drivers make mistakes, not every split-second racing decision of theirs can be successful. As Alonso stated a few days ago, people are too harsh on drivers, criticizing them at every turn. This year seems to have worsened the effect as everyone flip flops on a drivers’ chances after each race. Not many have seemingly adjusted to the new points system, applying the large gaps as if the old system was still in place.

      Alonso also seems to have been correct in how luck plays out and in the end, it balances out. Hamilton who always had luck on his side through most of the season has 3 retirements in the last 4 (reminds me of ’07. Great luck the whole season except the catastrophic last 2). Still, hes very much in the hunt for the championship and can’t be counted out. I’m not sure why hes saying hes no longer thinking of the WDC, might just be emotions.

      1. rafa says:

        I dunno, I´ve been looking at those images again and James might be right that it wasn´t as clear cut a mistake as in Monza, but it begs the question of whether Hamilton would not sometimes fair better if he kept his emotions under check. I know that part of his hype -and well deserved- is he´s a very aggressive driver and that makes him a favorite of the track. I´m no fan of his but I really do admire his qualities and enjoy his racing. All that said, I think that his biggest mistake is that he doesn´t use a calculator when running and that costs him dearly: that´s were I was getting at when I said that his much less talented teammate is nearly on the par with him in the championship: also I was trying to tell some of the hard core hamilton guys around that there´s a lot more to a driver than just raw talent and balls: a lot of them deride guys like Alonso or Button or Webber for being cagey or not taking risks: the fact is, if Hamilton had avoided a couple of risks and I do include today´s overtaking -Webber was no way going to yield easily, common in the long run that overtake could cost a championship- he would probably be in a position to win his second WDC. not that he´s not now, but, now he´s obliged to take some more risks, and if you think about it it´s all quite ironic.

      2. RickeeBoy says:

        Nice balanced approach Rafa which just about hits the nail on the head about Hammy – I’m a lover of all skills and understand the older heads who are achieving points – The only thing is – I love to watch raw talent – and Hammy has this by the bucketfull – he has time to mature and stop the exuberant displays of skill, bravery and passion but I just love watching him at the moment – He’ll get older and learn to stop wearing his heart on his sleeve and win more WDC by more controlled actions – but I’ll still be hunting for the Gilles or Young Hammy or Balls out Nigel where I scream with passion. PS All 5 of them putting on a great show, this year.

    3. Tim. says:

      I dislike Hamy more then anyone, but this time he was not in the wrong. MW was…..period.

      1. Samuel says:

        Why do many F1 fans begin a sentence about hamilton with ‘Im no fan of his, but…’
        It would seem to be that yheyre almost afraid to just say yea, I admire his racing without speaking some sort of disclaimer??

        why is he the only driver who gets this??

      2. Steven says:

        Hamilton had the line through that turn, Webber cut across that line and ended up hitting him. Its not a mistake by Hamilton, its a mistake by Webber, the stewards were very linient with him, this should have costed him the race. Ayrton Senna once said “if you no longer go for the gap, you are no longer a racing driver”. If Hamilton didnt go for that gap, he would be being critizised for not trying to pass.

      3. Dank says:

        Your view is the polar opposite of my own.

        Mark was on the inside, defending as is his right. Lewis tried to go around the outside, as such the onus is on him as he was making a pass on the outside to ensure he leaves enough room for the defending car.

        Hard but fair.

  18. Robert Lujan says:

    Great call to get Webber early in. Had he not banged wheels with Hammy he could have taken Vettel! Well done Red Bull and Ferrari!

    1. Mojo66 says:

      I just read an interview with Hiroshi Yasukawa, Director of Motorsport at Bridgestone. He reports that the incident with Hamilton had put the flank of Webber’s right front tire off the rim, yet the tire perfectly kept all the pressure inside until the end of the race, which to him is somewhat like a miracle.

    2. Martin says:

      Given that Mark had not been on Sebastian’s pace all weekend and was on much older tyres and the general difficulty in overtaking between even cars, I admire your optimism.

  19. Kev says:

    What a race from Alonso! Man of the moment! Absolutely stunning, flawless drive from start to finish! The engine too didn’t give up on him even when pushed to the max.

    And Vettel drove an awesome drive and kept Alonso at his absolute best. Ultimate racing between both. Webber did well to take advantage of his pitstop and jump the McLarens.

    Good for Button to get some useful points and remain a contender for the WDC even though it looks a little far fetched for both the McLarens now in the WDC.

    As much as McLaren looked faster during qualifying, they seemed awfully slow to the Ferrari and the Red-Bulls. A lot of work to be done for them to have any chance of winning either of the championship.

    Schumi drove a solid race until he came together with Kamikaze Kobayashi. I am really looking forward to his drive in 2011 car which would give a clear idea whether he still has it in him or not.

    Massa drove a superb, flawless drive to get two points after starting last of the grid.

    Looking forward to Suzuka for an exciting end to the season.

    James any thought on Hamilton’s drive and the steering wheel throwing incident? Hope you would do an article on that just like you did for Rubens.

    1. Martin B says:

      “James any thought on Hamilton’s drive and the steering wheel throwing incident? Hope you would do an article on that just like you did for Rubens.”

      Big difference. Rubens threw it onto the racing line in Monaco and it was collected by another driver – Hamilton didn’t. I’m not justifying Lewis throwing the wheel, just saying that the two incidents are not comparable.

  20. SuperOsnola says:

    James, has Fernando done a “Grand Chelem”?
    Pole position, victory and fastest lap of the race without loosing first position in any moment I think…
    What an incredible race, it reminded me of Imola 2005. Excellent Kubica, for me the third best driver today.
    Now it comes Suzuka, which will probably be another “Red Bull land” like Hungary. Let’s hope not.

  21. Brett Roberts says:

    There’s a picture forming this season, when it comes to Webber and Vettel, they are simply not very good when it comes to close combat driving. The other drivers need to be on their guard. Not only have they taken each other out in Turkey but Webber has taken out Kovy in Valencia in a poorly judged overtake and Hamilton in Singapore. Vettel has taken out button in a crazy manouver at Spa. Honestly it beggars belief at the overtaking ineptitude of these two.

    1. captainj84 says:

      don’t wholly argree with your post, these two red bull drivers are at the upper end of the 24 best drivers in the world! There are no inept overtakers in f1, there are sensible overtakers (e.g button, kubica) and some risky overtakers (eg kobayashi, schumi) imho vettel is the latter and webber is one of the careful overtakers. With cars in such close proximity there is always going to be contact whether it be dramatic or not, but just because they are to blame doesn’t make them inept. Turkey 100 % vettels fault, spa 100% vettels fault. But as for your webber comment the incident with kovi was not his fault, the far slower lotus had a very early braking point in that corner and the closing speed from webber was immense and caught him out (remember there aint any brake lights on the car, the drivers have to judge if a car in front is braking or not) and as for today, webber had the racing line, hamilton nosed in front then shut the door, webber had nowhere to go, he was turning into the corner hamilton was turning into him, check the replay, his left wheel was on the red and white kerb. Yes both rb’s involved in several racing incidents but no pattern developing as far as i can see! Cheers, john, lotus fan!

      1. devilsadvocate says:

        Yeah, Hamilton pulled a more or less similar incident on Webber as Vettel did in Turkey, and just like Turkey or maybe more so since Hamilton isnt a teamate Webber had no obligation to cede the race line to Hamilton. He failed to make a full pass and went into bully mode, which if you look at a lot of Hamilton’s “famous” overtaking maneuvers as highlighted in the video someone posted yesterday, a lot of Hamilton’s overtakes result in the other guy taking to the grass or backing off (anyone remember how hard it looked like button had to brake in Turkey?). Webber has proven time and time again you’d better overtake clean or take him/yourself out in the process, herefuses to be intimidated. I swear that man has balls the size if watermelons when he’s on the racetrack. The problem of course is, sometimes you get taken out with that attitude, maybe the new flexi wing tests have turned the RB6 into somewhat of a battering ram.

      2. Dominic J says:

        Why does Webber have no obligation to cede the line? He was behind to the extent that the front of his front wheels hit the back of Hamilton’s rears, he was on the inside – in other words he could see the whole incident. Sutil and Buemi both backed off in the same situation Webber found himself in and that let Kubica fight back to 7th.

        Webber has a history of crashing into people who try (dare?) to overtake him. The standard when I was greowing up (’90s) was that if your front wheels are behind the other driver’s rear wheels, it’s your fault if you crash – you could always have hit the brakes.

      3. Martin says:

        While I agree with most of what you said, in Turkey Vettel was up the inside in a tight space and tried to squeeze Webber in a straighline, similar to Alonso and Vettel at the start yesterday. It was an intimidatory move on the straight rather than one in the corner.

      4. devilsadvocate says:

        Well according to Dominic’s clarification, Vettel ran over Webber’s wing so who was at fault there? And Im inclined to disagree with Martin mostly because Hamilton’s move was also intended to scare Mark into blinking and nabbing the brakes. Its bad racing because you are forcing an inevitable accident by making a sudden movement onto the line of another driver and making them responsible to avoid the crash. The exact kind of move that Schumacher used to punt Hill in ’94 and again when he made Button blink exiting the pits earlier in the season (cant remember which one), and Hamilton used it again with Button in Turkey.

        Hamilton chose a wide sweeping line into the corner that allowed him to carry more speed across the apex, unfortunately he was not fully clear of Mark, so while that burst of speed got him a little further in front of Mark thus front to rear contact, if you look at how far he slid sideways before hitting the curb, Lewis could have hung a little wider Mark would have lost a lot of momentum from taking the tighter line and then the Mclaren would put the power down to leave him. Either way, avoiding the accident would have required two of the most arrogant figures in the sport to be a little more conservative… and well the result explains itself. Mark really seems to be able to take a beating and keep on rolling, sort of amazed myself. Schumacher and Heidfeld had an almost identical incident and it crippled both of them.

  22. The Transformed Tiger says:

    It was a great race but i still think Red Bull can still do more damage. Its clear that Seb thinks his main championship opponent will be Alonso and not Mark, its a great analysis considering that Webber has a huge points advantage over the Seb. But Formula 1 has these bizzare rules, engine limitation and freezing development and innovation really is not a classy thing. Its like government coming over to your house and dictating how much you can spend your money. In a way there are some who will spend huge amounts to get results like championship and race wins but there are others who will spend little amount to promote their brands and be not bothered. Like Max once said that if you dont have budgets to compete in F1 then you must compete at cheaper forms of racing like GP2.

  23. dotdotger says:

    Just a little bit to add on.

    This race added Alonso to the list of drivers who managed a Grand Chelem. The last driver who achieved it was Schumacher in 2004 Hungarian GP, a good 6 years back.

    A tremendous race from Alonso & Ferrari.

    1. James Allen says:

      …meaning pole, lights to flag win and fastest lap..

      1. Nilesh says:

        Didn’t Raikkonen do that in Australia 2007? Great stuff from Alonso today. What a masterclass drive.

        Question for you James: Alonso was on the limit fending off Vettel today. How much does that add on to the already stressed engine that he has there considering his allocated engines situation?

      2. James Allen says:

        No sweat, say Ferrari. This was the unit which had already done Germany and Hungary, so I think it will only be used for the odd Friday from now on. For the remaining four races he has the engines which did Spa and Monza, both of which have only done one race. THey’ve been getting 2,500kms out of an engine recently

      3. dotdotger says:

        The lap leaders were traded between Kimi, Alonso & Hamilton for the 58 laps.
        Kimi managed a Hat trick in Australia 2007.
        =)

        I thought a Grand Chelem was pretty much impossible considering the gaps of the teams and the current rules & regulations.

        James: Do you think Alonso’s remaining engines will be able to take on the last 4 races?

  24. James B says:

    Great drive by Alonso who clearly held off a faster car in Vettel. Alonso now is in a great position but will his engines hold out?

    As for the Hamilton/Webber battle I would say it is a racing incident but that Webber was overly aggressive. Webber gets involved in far too many of these incidents and is overly aggressive. Webber does seem to have an air of untouchablity by the media because he is so well liked.

  25. James Draper says:

    Alonso and Ferrari has to be the favorable combination for the championship now. A very impressive performance from him in the last two races.

    There were a lot of comments about why McLaren didn’t pit Hamilton sooner. After looking at the telemetry from the race it appears that Hamilton was never 25 seconds ahead of Webber. Hamilton was making a second a lap until he was 24 seconds ahead on lap 25 then his next 3 laps were average 2 seconds slower, presumably because he lost his tires.

    This next comment may be because I am biased towards Hamilton, but I think Webber hit him on purpose as he knew he was beaten to the corner. Does anyone else remember Australia?

    1. James Draper says:

      Just some more comments to stir the pot. I know Webber was on the inside line, even though he was more than half a car behind but I thought it was the racing line which is what is considered when determining fault. Lewis was ahead, on the racing line and Webber had no chance of making the corner “correctly” without hitting Lewis.

      1. Lojen says:

        I have watched the incident quite a few times now and have come to a similar conclusion. Weber simply braked too late from a tight inside line to be able to take the corner correctly without hitting Hamilton.

        I think from a normal line his braking point would have been fine but not from the tight inside line he found himself on.

        Having said that I still think the stewards probably got it right with their decision, but there is a reasonable chunk of blame on Weber, just not enough for a penalty.

      2. Mojo66 says:

        Webber got the braking wrong, but not also because he was taking the shorter line, but also because his car was bouncing off the curbs, which significantly increased breaking distance.

      3. Aey says:

        Totally agree, there is no way that Mark can make the corner without touching. Not just a soft touch but big hit.

        I am not on the Lewis side, but I think there is totally Mark false.

        See another side as Lewis in not the one who try to pass Mark. Lewis run from Normal racing line and make the conner normally, and assume Mark as the one who try to pass from the inside line and try to brake deeper to late and hit the one who already make the corner. there is not side by side touching, but Mark hit the rear wheel of Lewis.

        Yes, There is racing incident but who was to blame. for sure Mark false.

      4. Sebeee says:

        Outside pass and it’s Mark’s fault? You force the issue like Lewis made and you have to know you’re putting your car in harm’s way.

        Great TV!!

        Since Mark seems to get away with these you can’t help but feel like it’s his year.

      5. Aey says:

        The Outside line is normal racing line, is that call harm’s way? in normal line and pass mark about 90% of the car length. At that position, Lewis have all the right to make turn to the corner.

        The position of Mark car is not in the normal inside line, there is no way to defend, even god can’t do that too.

        from your opinion, could you give me some idea how mark can defend Lewis from that posiiton.

      6. Tim B says:

        Remember that it’s where they are when they brake that matters, and at that point Lewis only had his nose in front. Once they’re both on the brakes, there’s nothing the inside driver can do to change things – he’s entirely dependent on the outside driver to leave enough room.

        Webber didn’t appear to brake late, either – he braked either *earlier* or harder, because Lewis had moved slightly further ahead by the time he turned in. Webber also clearly didn’t go wide – his left front wheel was touching the curb.

        I think the stewards got it right – Lewis said himself that he couldn’t see where Webber was. Possibly Lewis was carrying too much momentum to leave more room.

    2. Martoni Black says:

      It would be nice if Ferrari and Alonso take the title, Ferrari have lost it so many times especially on the last round, i remember Prost being shoved off by Senna, then Michael lost it to Hakkinen, Irvine too etc, so i dont get too excited. There is so much that can change but its all fingers crossed as Michael used to say at Ferrari. But I have to say that Stefano is probably the best team principal ever at Ferrari, its what the old Man would have wanted things to run for his company. Kimi in his first season he was champion. Ferrari is no longer bulletproof, they had to go through a major transition but what makes the whole Ferrari team great is that they improve on the mistakes of the past. The whole Todt DNA management style is still there.

      What is interesting is that both McLaren and Ferrari have won championships many times and Red Bull is the one with pressure to be world champions.

      Forza Italia

    3. MartinWR says:

      I am afraid Webber was as predictable as ever. If anyone can be guaranteed to make it difficult if not downright impossible for overtaking it’s the ocker. He simply doesn’t like being overtaken, especially when in a situation where he is a WDC contender as a result of happening to drive a cat that has the legs of the field by a large margin. Oh and as a result of the litany of misfortunes suffered by his faster team-mate, one or two of which were admittedly his own fault.

      Racing incident? Maybe, but it could have been avoided.

      1. YourDumDee says:

        It could have been avoided, true. Hamilton could have given a wider berth to Weber, given he was on the outside and could not see Weber in his mirrors. That’s one option for a different outcome.

    4. charlie says:

      Hitting your rivals when leading the championship at any stage in the season is very undesirable. Risking the chance DNF at this late stage in the championship given the calibre of your opponents would be plain nonsensical. Webber defended his position fairly. The contact appeared to be unavoidable. I am surprised that the RB6 survived the encounter to be honest. Let it go. It was a racing incident.

  26. Nick4 says:

    Ferrari are now seeing a return on their investment in FA: not only is doing the job on the track, but he is also providing the leadership they so sorely lacked under Raikkonen.
    One wonders if McLaren secretly rue their handling of FA in favour of LH in 2007..!? They would have secured more than the one WC that they have since LH joined them. Fast as skilled as he is, today proved again how fragile his style of driving can make him appear.
    Both FA and SV should be very highly commended for providing the spectacle they did today at Singapore – absolutely top draw.

    1. RPJ says:

      Simply not true. Had they soley backed either Hamilton or Alonso in 07, one of them would have won. In 08 Hamilton won it, and on 09 neither of them would have had a chance with the car. This year I think we can all agree that Hamilton has performed as well as possible with a car which has never been the best out there, and we all know Alonso is getting a helping hand at ferrari.

      As for today’s tangle, a racing incident which was Webber’s fault. I.e no need for a penalty, but definately avoidable, which is why it’s so frustrating.

      1. Mikey says:

        “Avoidable” if Hamilton hadn’t shut the door in Webber’s face! Karting tactics don’t work very well in F1 – both Kubica and Webber showed how it should be done on such a tight track.

      2. Damian Johnson says:

        Yes…lets have more boring procession races!

  27. adam H says:

    Iv never known a driver to have fluked so much in his career! it makes me SICK! whenever i hear the name fernando alonso i think of kimi engine faliures and MASS dampers! oh and cheating in singapore 08 and germany too!

    1. Ian says:

      All the top cars had mass dampers in 2006. Ferrari, McLaren and Renault.
      Ferrari then got the FIA to ban them mid-season because they couldn’t get Bridgestone working 100% with them.
      Still , Alonso beat Schumacher in the slower Renault.

  28. Pedro Hansson says:

    Hade some wrong data in my previous comment. Here is the right data:

    Points difference compared to each team-mate
    1) Kubica 95
    2) Rosberg 76
    3) Alonso 66
    4) Sutil 36
    5) Barrichello 21
    6) Webber 21
    7) Kobayashi 15
    8) Hamilton 5
    9) Buemi 4
    10) Alguersuari -4
    11) Button -5
    12) De la Rosa -15
    13) Hulkenberg -21
    14) Vettel -21
    15) Liuzzi -36
    16) Massa -66
    17) Schumacher -76
    18) Petrov -95

    Percent of the teams total scoring
    1) Kubica 85,71%
    2) Sutil 79,03%
    3) Kobayashi 77,78%
    4) Rosberg 72,62%
    5) Buemi 70%
    6) Barrichello 68,42%
    7) Alonso 60,44%
    8) Webber 52,74%
    9) Hamilton 50,7%
    10) Button 49,3%
    11) Vettel 47,26%
    12) Massa 39,56%
    13) Hulkenberg 31,58%
    14) Alguersuari 30%
    15) Schumacher 27,38%
    16) De la Rosa 22,22%
    17) Liuzzi 20,97%
    18) Petrov 14,29%

    1. James Allen says:

      Thanks that makes interesting viewing

      1. DB says:

        I’m not sure Petrov agrees that it’s interesting. ¦¬)

  29. Sufyaan Patel says:

    Great result for Fernando, defended his position hard but fair at the start and then handled the pressure very well. Ted Kravitz reported that his team stated that he was pushing the car very hard, they were also pushing HIM as heard on the radio transmissions and boy did he look relieved on the podium!

    Still can’t get my head round Red Bulls thinking. Why bring Vettel in the same lap as Alonso? If his car was faster, surely he could’ve stayed out on the prime tyres, Alonso would’ve been getting the harder tyre upto temp and speed and that would’ve been enough for Vettel. Just as it were for Alonso in Monza.

    Also can’t believe Mclaren’s decision to keep their drivers out on worn tyres. It was clear to see that they were losing time, especially to Webber. Quite suprised by that decision as Mclaren are usually quite good at strategic calls.

    I feel its between Webber and Alonso now. Vettels also got a good chance to squeeze in if he can string together some good results.

    James, of the remaining tracks, who do you think will have the upper hand? I’m guessing it’ll be very close to between RBR and Ferrari. I expect Mclaren to be strong but they seem to be falling off. As ever though, anything can happen so all is not lost for the Mclaren drivers.

    Oh, I can’t wait!!!

    1. James Allen says:

      It’s very close. Ferrari have beaten the rest now on extreme low downforce and extreme high downforce tracks

      1. k9major says:

        Thus disproving the suggestion made in some quarters that they had thrown everything at the car to win in Monza, at the expense of the remaining races.

      2. Mojo66 says:

        Uhm….Hungary?

    2. Martin says:

      Sufyaan,

      I think it is worth noting that Singapore doesn’t have many fast or long corners. Suzuka and Brazil should give more of an edge to Red Bull than Singapore based on the faster corners. From what I’ve seen of the Korean track, it had similarities to Malaysia, so it should also be good for Red Bull. Abu Dhabi is more like Singapore in my view. The further development will be key though, bringing parts that work.

      Red Bull are looking strong favourites for the constructors title now.

  30. Miguel says:

    Hi james. Whats up with Button??? When will we see him really go fight it for the championship??? He always avoids head 2 head confrontation with the other big drivers and seems 2 be happy enough with finishing the races… Strategy maybe? Or is he just realistic about his capabilities?

    1. James Allen says:

      If he’d known the state of Webber’s tyre after the collision with Hamilton he might have attacked. He set his fastest lap of the race on the last lap, never a good sign

      1. michael grievson says:

        He should have been attacking anyway. He needs to take points out of the others in order to win the championship.

        I think buttons a great driver but he does lack that killer instinct Hamilton, alonso and have.

    2. Axu says:

      My impression was that Button had half a car in front of Hamilton and the inside line for Turn 1, right after the start. But he braked (too) early and Lewis took the corner first. Am I wrong?
      For overtaking Hamilton, all that Jenson had to do was to stick to his line and match Lewis’ braking.
      As a fan of Button, I am a bit mystified…

      1. James Draper says:

        Agree I texted a friend saying “Button let Hamilton by him”

      2. YourDumDee says:

        All the comments re Button are accurate. But we still cannot ignore the fact that he is now just 5 points behind Lewis in a WDC that was supposed to see Hamilton crushing him by now. Button is not nearly as exciting to watch as Lewis, but in the end he gets the results he needs. Discretion and the better part of valor and all that I’d say.

      3. mtb says:

        Interestingly, Ron Dennis was more bullish about Hamilton before the race.

    3. MartinWR says:

      Jense is fighting hard for the championship, but he’s doing it in his calm and measured way, as usual. He did say afterwards he was flat out, all the way so appearances can be deceptive. Remember, if Vettel hadn’t taken him out at Spa, and McLaren’s pit stop at Monza had been competitive, he would have been one of the front runners now. But all that does is to show what a large part luck plays in deciding the WDC. His ream mate’s approach, Banzai charges, hardly seems to be paying off though.

      1. Stuart Moore says:

        Also Monaco – having to retire due to a radiator bung being left in. He would almost certainly have had 5 points from that race.

    4. Miguel says:

      Personally i dont believe in his ‘low key’ strategy… I am more inclined to think his goal is fixed on Hamilton instead of on the championship. How many of you think like me¿?

  31. Paul says:

    Robert’s excellent ride

    1. Martin says:

      I’d say excellent drive, though it doesn’t scan as well. The car (ride) is only the 4-6 sixth best out there at the moment. For me he has been the driver of the season, obvious ability to match the guys wining races and fewer mistakes than anyone else in the field. Rosberg also did well (also for most of the season), but didn’t have to make any passes.

  32. Flintster says:

    I dare say the BBC producers are looking at the theme music to salute the Great 3 Times World Champion Alonso at the end of the season!!!

    COME ON!!!

  33. momo says:

    the webber-hamilton case was just a racing incident but what nobody is talking about is how the mclaren car are just not up to the job they were 1.5s off the pace and ferrari on form at the moment mclaren simply run out of luck they never had the car from the very begining to beat rb an ferrari but rather have been banking on ferrari and the bulls misfortune i think is over for them its marc and fernando who have the car for the remaining races.

    1. Martin says:

      I think there is a particular circuit characteristic here that caused the McLaren to wear its rear tyres more than it has at other tracks. At other tracks the balance and/or traction has been better, so the race pace has been better than qualifying. Here it was the reverse.

      Yes, McLaren have until recently optimised its opportunities, but they still had strong cars at certain tracks, such as Turkey, Montreal and Spa. The McLaren was the best car at the latter two tracks, and possibly Turkey in the race as well, although Vettel may have been quicker in clear air.

  34. François says:

    I thought Mclaren had the pace on Saturday? Why were they struggeling in the race? Did the change something in the car after quali? And why they didn’t pit earlier when it was clear Webber was catching up? Mclaren really disappoint me today.

    Sorry for my bad english, i’m from france.

    1. Martin says:

      The McLarens struggled as they were wearing out their rear tyres, which is probably a mix of a lack of downforce compared to Ferrari and particularly Red Bull and suspension set up. The suspension set up could have favoured qualifying over the race, working the tyres harder.

      The McLaren’s never had a big enough gap over Webber to stop and come out in front. For several laps they were gaining time at the required rate, but were never far enough ahead to stop and come out in front. At that point they were trying to get far enough in front of Schumacher and Kobayashi to make sure they would come out in front and not get held up.

  35. Ddraig says:

    Even though this championship is exciting there are still 2 things which I am puzzled by:

    1 – Webber is ahead and a real contender to win yet I still see the guys at RBR and even Mark himself half happy, as if he’s the Nº 2 and shouldn’t be there. If that’s the case seems they haven’t learned from Maclaren 2007.

    2 – I never rated Button as a dog fighter and capable of driving like Kubica in a similar situation like in today’s race. Mixing it up and battling it out. He always seemed to be the perfect leader, drive a perfect race if he has a clear field infront but looking at his races in Maclaren, I get the feeling he’s accomodating himself to be the Nº 2 at Maclaren and just be happy to rake in some points and get the car to the finish line in one piece. The only time I see him race is if he’s in P1 and has someone breathing down his neck e.g. Monza or if its one of those chaotic races where a lucky change of strategy hauls him up several places like when it starts to rain in the middle of a race or a SC comes out etc.

    It’s my opinion anyway.

    1. Mojo66 says:

      The jenson Button of 2010 reminds me a lot of Niki Lauda in 1984. With prost, Lauda had an extremely fast teammate, but through clever driving Lauda managed to outperform Prost over the season. Also, Prost was backed by Ron Dennis and the team, whereas Lauda was mostly racing on his own. The similarity stroke me during the interview that Jenson gave to the BBC, where he was talking about the problems the McLaren had with the rear tires over the whole weekend, and therefore conserving the rears during the first half of the race, and then closing in on Hamilton who didn’t save his tires.

      If we were back in 80′s where there was no radio communication with the pit, Hamilton would be nowhere, because he is so dependent on instructions from the pit. Jenson, OTOH, would be far ahead of Hamilton because he is able to read a race and make the proper decisions while driving. I remember him after the Monza race saying that he was watching the TV screens to see if the car following him would start an attack, or something like that. He is very clever guy, whereas Hamilton just has his talent.

      1. Steven says:

        Soo… You can listen to McLarens radio comunications? You should post a transcript. Are you sugesting that somehow the car is being driven from the pits? As far as I can see the only one inside the car is Hamilton.

  36. mtb says:

    Some observations.

    1. Alonso is far and away the most complete driver in F1. His performance today was arguably the drive of the season.

    2. McLaren was once again comprehensively out-strategised, demonstrating that the Monza faux-pas was not a one-off.

    3. Button has again failed to step up when it matters. Forget the Prost comparisons – he is another David Coulthard.

    4. Klien, a journeyman, demolished Senna.

    5. Ron Dennis is as obnoxious as ever, as anyone who saw his pre-race interview would have observed. I am sure that the Schadenfreude flowed around the world as his predictions failed to materialise.

    6. Rosberg put in a great performance, but I am not sure if he ever was on TV.

    1. Jeremiah says:

      I am fascinated with Ron, so I wonder what he said this time.
      Is Schadenfreude something that they gave him to eat at the Mercedes Hospitality and did not go down well? I guess he predicted he was going to get some good sausages instead

      1. mtb says:

        Interestingly, Ron seemed to have far more faith in Hamilton’s abilities than in Button’s.

      2. Damian Johnson says:

        Like Domenicali has with Alonso’s abilities than Massa ever since the first grand prix this year?

    2. Damian Johnson says:

      “Ron Dennis is as obnoxious as ever, as anyone who saw his pre-race interview would have observed.”

      Only a closed mind would seek to criticise when it is an emotional response to a team or inviduals success that one does not like for irrational reasons!

  37. Dr Prozac says:

    Kubica actually overtook Alguersuari, Buemi, Petrov, Massa and Sutil, not just Petrov and Massa :)

  38. mo kahn says:

    Okay… All of you… give me your percentage split… How much were Monza & Singapore victories were down to Alonso and how much was it due to Ferrari?

    Example: 60% Alonso – 40% Ferrari

    1. mtb says:

      Monza 60% Ferrari, 40% Alonso
      Singapore 40% Ferrari, 60% Alonso

  39. Bernard says:

    Webber was clearly at fault here and should admit as much. He was compromised by the Virgin, committed himself to the tight inside dirtier line, on 30 lap old tyres and could see Hamilton in front of him on the racing line long before they reached the corner plus Hamilton was running on new rubber.

    It’s a racing incident no doubt, it takes two to tango but Webber should hold his hands up for this one, Lewis did nothing wrong at all.

    1. MartinWR says:

      Webber will do anything to prevent someone overtaking him, as we’ve seen several times in the past. This time he managed to take Hamilton out without damaging his own car, but he was incredibly lucky not to have wrecked the rear suspension of the Red Bull in the process. It was pure stupidity on his part and would normally have put him out of the race.

  40. LycraClad says:

    Even though there was some good action on the track, the whole event left me bored. There just seemed to be no atmosphere there at all. Was it just the dismal coverage??
    Webber/Hamilton incident – racing incident, but I can’t help thinking Webber put the car in a stupid position. He was never going to make the turn and was lucky to not also be out of the race.
    Alonso has all the momentum now which must be worrying all the contenders. He knows how to win it. I think it’s his to lose as I think Webber is starting to seize up under the pressure.

  41. Martin says:

    I think Webber can thank Rubens a great deal for managing his tyres, as he started to close on the McLarens, allowing Mark to do the same. It probably didn’t make any difference with Button, but I think it was a key thing in getting ahead of Hamiton. From memory, Rosberg and Kubica didn’t really close on Button before the stops, so what Rubens did was notable, as only Alonso and Vettel matched it.

    1. BMG says:

      Interesting, If Webber got passed Rubens, I think you would have seen all the leading teams come in a lot earlier. You may have even seen Alonso an Vettel come in much earlier.

  42. pete says:

    Message to you james, if eddie jordan your mate wants to slag off a great champion michael schumacher, on world tv, get him to do it to his face, he will not be so loud mouthed then, ive seen schumacher peed off, and he is quite scary. Eddie jordans opinion is totally biased, schumacher left his grotty team, early in his career, and jordan is just trying to get him back for doing that.
    The great jackie stewart, talked about schumacher, in the practice program, which you must have heard, and he talked total sense, unlike you schumacher haters, he stated schumacher drives a racing car, different to all other drivers, the way schumacher likes his car setup, most drivers cant handle, he calls it the brain is over the front wheels, he gets right close to a corner, and then he turns it in viciously, that cannot be done with the car he is in, and dont forget even jensen button admitted that car was set up for his style, and didnt suit schumacher, but schumacher has done what he has to with it.
    judge schumacher next season, and sack jordan, because most people hate the guy, were talking thousands of people, check around if you dont believe me.

    1. MartinWR says:

      I also think EJ is quite wrong about Michael, but I certainly do not hate the guy. If he is generally disliked by petrolheads it’s because his viewpoint as an ex-team manager is very different from what they’re used to hearing. He’s also older generation too, and that tends to count against him. But team managers are as much a part of F1 as drivers. There have been many occasions when EJ has been right and DC wrong. Anyone who thinks EJ is a fool is wrong, you don’t get to run your own F1 team if you’re the complete idiot many take him for

      As for Michael, hopefully next season we’ll see if he still has what it takes if he gets a car that isn’t designed in the first place to understeer, and is competitive as well. Interesting.

    2. Ian says:

      Eddie Jordan had a love fest for Schumacher at the start of the year, He couldn’t stop complimenting him.
      So this talk of Jordan hating Schumacher is complete nonsense.
      Jordan is talking about what has happened on track, the facts. The facts are Schumacher has driven appallingly. He hit 3 cars in Singapore alone. Rosberg in the same car finished 5th and blew away Schumacher.
      Those are the facts, Jordan was talking from a team boss perspective.
      He was completely right when he said if his name was not ‘schumacher’ he would have been sacked by now.

  43. pete says:

    oh sorry, did i say thousands, i should have said millions.
    please set up a meeting on tv between schumacher, and jordan, and then we will see how quiet jordan can be, after his usual ranting nonsense.
    i guarantee, he wont question schumacher or his ability, because he knows, he will recieve a very sharp reply, which he wont like at all, he is constantly putting schumacher down, and its about time schumacher or ecclestone, shut him up.

  44. pete says:

    Everyone on here you dont seem to realise how powerful schumacher is in f1, he is very close with bernie ecclestone, who runs f1, he has millions of fans worldwide, more than any other drivers, he is a 7 times world champ, never to be equalled, his name brings in the sponsors, (which nicos hardly does) for mercedes, who will be demanding schumacher gets a car he likes to drive, we are talking loads of cash they bring in, and if mercedes did not do right by michael, you watch their car sales plummet, from disgruntled schumacher fans, because they wouldnt do business with the team that did the dirty on michael.
    This guy deserves a car made for his style, and then we will see if schumacher can still race, not listen to the schumacher haters , always putting him down, when he is driving a car, that is basically a pile of s**t.
    Nico loves this car, and it shows, so let schumacher love his car, and then he will show you all how wrong you are, and then you can hate him as before, when he starts beating these so called great drivers of today.

    1. MartinWR says:

      I’m all for Michael knocking Alonso off his perch if he can, somebody has to!

      1. Arri says:

        Like Alonso did to Schumi ? ;-)

      2. Ian says:

        It won’t be Michael, he had a faster Ferrari in 2006 and Alonso still beat him in a slower Renault. Massa was even winning races for fun in the 2006 Ferrari.
        Alonso won then when Michael was much younger than he is now.
        Alonso would beat him far easier now that Michael is 41.

      3. Damian Johnson says:

        It’s widely accepted that Hamilton would give Alonso a run for his money at Ferrari for the number #1 seat. One suspects that Alonso would never accept a #2 seat and that’s the reason why Alonso has been widely quoted for saying that he would not want Hamilton to drive for Ferrari.

  45. pete says:

    oh yes, get jackie stewart in to replace eddie jordan, this guy knows what he is talking about, and it is informative, and interesting to listen to, and im sure many, many fans feel the same.

  46. Baktru says:

    As an indication of how close this championship really is, under the old points system, the standings would have been:

    Webber: 80
    Alonso: 77
    Hamilton: 75
    Vettel: 74
    Button: 72

    It also shows the five of them less than a win apart, but for people still more used to that system, it may give a clearer picture of what is happening.

    1. Charlie B says:

      Thanks for that, I dislike people who say the new points system is making it close, the old system is basically the same. I prefer looking at this system as it means I can compare it to past years.

      Assuming there is 4 races left, 40 points available (old money), the maximum number of points is 120 for Webber which would be quite good if he wins the final four races, but Kimi had 110 with two fewer races in 07.

  47. James says:

    Just out of interest, if Michael Schumacher was a rookie this season, who thinks he has done enough to be retained for next year?

  48. beka says:

    Being a really distinguished overtaker, Hamilton was so arrogant in numerous instances (against Webber in China) and in past years as well (remember Monza 2008). Actually I’m glad he got stomped two times in a row. Webber and Massa showed him there can be guys tougher and meaner out there. I hope Hamilton rethinks his arrogant driving style after that

    1. Aey says:

      In China, you mean at the restart, right?

      In china, Lewis is not try to pass webber and intend to hit webber, he is in the middle between Vettel and Webber.

      Vettel was in the inside and step to outside, Lewis move to avoid the contact from Vettel then he get contact with Webber instead.

    2. Charlie B says:

      Hamiltons style is back down or we’ll crash, i’ve been waiting for it to happen but the rest of the field want to keep their points.

      He would be a better package if he could overtake cars in a “fair fight” with no forcing people to concede or chicane cutting.

      He can overtake and I want to see that but I like some nice, well thought moves, like Mika Hakkinen, Spa 2000, it could have happened with the Virgin in the way.

  49. goofball says:

    “Button Quicker than Webber”.

    I dont think so James.
    Mark easily kept Jenson at bay when jenson pushed a little. And that was with a vibrating car.

  50. Andrew Shouldbe Working says:

    This is yet another example of lamentable pit wall decisions by McLaren. All season they have been out witted out thought by RBR and Ferrari. In an earlier post it was pointed out that it was a case of men against machines where LH and JB were pitted against the superior RB6 of Red Bull. While they frequently stole results against RBR, LH pointed out way back that they had been overhauled by Ferrari. Consequently this struggle has been made impossible by now having to fight on three fronts, RBR having a better car, Ferrari having a better car and coupled with a pitwall who cannot react correctly during the race. Why they kept both cars out on Sunday when they were 3 seconds off the pace is pure lunacy. If Mclaren persist in producing off pace cars and couple this with poor decision making, they will no longer attract the quality of drivers they need to stay in the top flight

  51. JohnBt says:

    A fantastic quali and a fabulous win for Alonso.
    Goes to proof he’s still the best with the most points hauled for the last five races.

    Vettel held his pace very well and it was very obvious he was catching Alonso towards the last segment of the race. What a finish with only two tenths difference.

    Webber as usual managed to score good points to keep his lead. The maturity shines through with Mark and Alonso. One cannot deny the fact.

    Poor Hamilton need to sought out his overtaking issues of late.

    Was surprised that Vettel pitted the same time as Alonso.
    Thought Vettel would have done at least two more flying laps.

    Kudos to Kovi for his quick action and decided not to pit with the fire as it got really big.

    Rubens too drove well, you could feel his steady quick pace.

    Honestly, the race was almost a procession if not for the varied incidents that took place, with Lewis’s being the highlight of the night.

    Oh yes, IT DIDN”T RAIN. That was my prediction, lol.

    Suzuka will be a burner, I foresee.

    1. Damian Johnson says:

      One would need to deduct points from Alonso’s win at Hockenheim in order to make a fair comparison with the other WDC hopefuls who do not have the unfair advantage of doing team swaps.

  52. pete says:

    Good replys, but please put yourself in schumachers situation, lets just say someone on tv , said that you were not good at your job, and put you down on world tv, you would take offense, im sure you would, as anyone on this forum would, its called DEFAMATION OF CHARACTER, putting down that person, by broadcasting it across the world is just so wrong, schumacher is a great champion and deserves respect.
    When eddie was spouting his drivel on tv, did you see martin brundle looking very uncomfortable in the seat next to him, and he did not back up eddies viewpoint, here are the facts, you check out all the forums, and you will see, most people want him sacked, and lets get jackie stewart in.
    Eddie continually keeps calling for schumacher to get the sack, when it should be him getting the sack, and getting someone in , with a balanced view, possibly you, at least you talk sense, and good forum by the way.
    If you dont believe that eddie is slagging off a great 7 times world champion, who has done so much for f1, you go and watch all the races you broadcasted, and you listen to everything he says about michael ,it will open your eyes, us schumacher fans are livid with the constant, slagging off of him by this man, we ask for fairness, he never says it to schumachers face does he, whys that? us fans know why.
    I know lots of schumacher fans have written to bbc and bernie ecclestone about this.
    We fans just want schumacher in a competitive car, to see if he still has the magic, thats all, its not too much to ask is it.
    And james did you see the interview with schumacher and bernie ecclestone, when bernie was asked, if schumacher had the red bull car, would he be winning races, and bernie simply answered, yes, and when schumacher was asked the same question, his reply was , i would have a lot more options, in other words , yes.
    check out the interview, i think it was on f1 eurosport site, not sure, you should be able to find it.

    1. goofball says:

      Gee Pete, you are persistant arent chu ?

      Yes, Michael could still drive and win in an RBR car. There you go. But so could, and so are, the current RBR drivers.
      Michael’s done and he’s just old so let it go bro.

  53. pete says:

    There you go guys,the interview with schumacher and bernie. http://www.formula1.com/news/interviews/2010/8/11154.html

  54. pete says:

    Boring race by the way, as most people agree on other forums.

    1. goofball says:

      Pete, it wasnt boring. Im a die hard web fan and loved the first half of the race watching him pick of Michael and others, then on the back half Kubica doing his thing.
      It was only boring if you only fancy one
      driver. The championship is alive so stay tuned !

      1. pete says:

        [mod]
        yes it was boring, if you want to see actual racing, if grand prix wants to be a sport, it should all have the same car designs, and the actual best driver wins, not the lucky sod to get the best car, f1 is not a sport , it is a business, and it is boring, if it wasnt for schumacher, me and many schumacher fans wouldnt bother watching it, fact.
        bernie knows f1 is struggling with popularity, and he will try to change things soon.

      2. Damian Johnson says:

        Agree that it was boring. F1 does not need street circuits such as Singapore inspite of the ‘at night’ racing spectacle. The race is almost won and lost in qualifying with so little overtaking opportunities during the race. Processional racing at its worst.

  55. pete says:

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lets-get-rid-of-Eddie-Jordan/76395742563

    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=wall&gid=145222550033

    http://forums.itv.com/thread/817151.aspx

    just a few examples, there are many ,many more out there.

    you do realise he is getting paid high wages, and jetting round the world, on our licence money, so i feel we do have a say in the matter, get rid of eddie jordan, no one wants him on tv, fact.

  56. Damian Johnson says:

    Great drives from Vettel, Webber, Button and Hamilton until his bad luck.

    A mature drive from Vettel and some great overtaking by Webber inspite of the Redbull characteristic crash driving into Hamilton’s McLaren (the third Redbull collsion into a McLaren this season). Could be the critical factor for McLaren losing the WCC to Redbull.

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