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Webber charges to Hungarian GP win, as Vettel is caught napping
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Webber charges to Hungarian GP win, as Vettel is caught napping
Posted By: James Allen  |  01 Aug 2010   |  3:12 pm GMT  |  159 comments

Mark Webber put in a charging drive today to get control of the Hungarian Grand Prix after his team mate Sebastian Vettel was given a penalty and put himself back in the lead of the championship battle.

It was Red Bull’s 100th Grand Prix start and its 12th victory and it gave them the lead in the constructors’ championship.

It was Webber’s fourth win of the season and the sixth win of his career and it was all built on an astonishing middle stint on soft tyres after a sudden safety car for debris on the track.


With Lewis Hamilton retiring from the race with gearbox problems before half distance and Sebastian Vettel’s chances of victory taken away by a stewards’ decision to award him a drive through penalty for not maintaining the correct gap behind the safety car, the way was clear for Webber to take advantage, but he had to put in a series of qualifying laps to build a big enough lead over Alonso to be able to pit and rejoin in the lead.

It was very hard on Vettel, who lost a race win through a rules technicality, but against that the rules about maintaining gaps behind the safety car were refined after the incident in Japan when Vettel hit Webber behind the safety car in Fuji in 2007. He should know the rules, though and it leaves him frustrated.

It was a very strong day for GP2 graduates Vitaly Petrov and Nico Hulkenberg, who finished 5th and 6th and for Pedro de la Rosa who was 7th, team mate Kamui Kobayashi also again scored points from the back of the grid.

Budapest is the third longest run to the first corner and the dirty side of the grid is the least grippy of the season. Predictably, at the start, Vettel got away cleanly but Webber from P2 on the grid was swallowed up by Alonso.

Petrov jumped Rosberg and Hamilton for fifth place but Hamilton repassed him. Nevertheless Petrov was able to pull away impressively from Rosberg in the first stint, while Kubica was tucked up behind him, losing ground.

Button slipped from 11th on the grid to 14th at the start.

The pit stops were brought forward by a safety car on lap 16, due to a piece of debris on the track from the Force India of Tonio Liuzzi. There was a rush to the pits, Vettel led it, Alonso followed, while Massa dropped a position to Hamilton.

Kubica was released into the path of Sutil, but the Pole was able to rejoin. However he was given a drive through penalty for unsafe release.

Meanwhile in all the panic, Mercedes didn’t put the right rear wheel onto Rosberg’s car and it came loose, rolling down the pit lane. Both incidents were very dangerous and it is extremely fortunate that no-one was hurt.

Button pitted just before the safety car and gained four places by doing so.

Webber didn’t pit under the safety car and was faced with the task of opening a big enough lead after the restart to be able to pit and rejoin ahead of Alonso.

There was drama when the stewards decided that Vettel had not maintained the correct gap behind the safety car and he was given a drive through penalty, which dropped him to third place, behind Alonso. He quickly closed up on the Spaniard.

“I didn’t understand why I was penalised,” said Vettel. “It should have been a very easy race from the restart, but I was sleeping, maybe relying too much on the radio, but I lost the radio in the first stint. Usually the leader tries to drop back but when I saw a big gap from Mark and the safety car to myself. Pretty unlucky I would say because it would have been a walk in the park today.”

Meanwhile Webber pushed like mad, hoping that the tyres would not start giving diminishing returns. He built a 23 second lead and when he pitted on lap 43 he was able to rejoin almost a whole pit straight ahead of Alonso, in the lead by 6 seconds.

On new tyres he then drove away from Alonso and doubled his margin after just six laps.

“With the safety car, I had to go off strategy to try to pass Fernando,” said Webber. “But we were asking a lot of the option tyres. The front left was completely finished and it was difficult to get to the end of the stint. Seb had some difficulties and it was a bit of a gift for me, but I’ve not had many of them. It was tough luck for him.”

Vettel cruised up on the back of Alonso, but wasn’t able to mount an attack on him. Alonso also described Vettel’s penalty giving him an extra position as a ‘gift’.

Rubens Barrichello didn’t pit behind the safety car and stayed out for most of the race on the hard tyres, pitting only in the closing stages when he was in sixth place. He rejoined 11th behind Michael Schumacher and mounted an attack on him with the newer tyres.

Barrichello passed him on lap 67 on the pit straight, but Schumacher chopped him into the wall. Barrichello missed the end of the wall by inches and was furious with his former team mate’s dangerous driving.

It was Schumacher the former champion raging against the dying of the light and against a former team mate with whom he has so much history. Of all the incidents so far in this troubled comeback season, this was the most outrageous. Barrichello, on the eve of his 300th Grand Prix, said that it was the most dangerous move he had ever had pulled on him.

“It got a bit tight, ” admitted Schumacher.

The stewards felt it was worse than that and handed him a ten place grid penalty for the next race at Spa later this month.

HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX, Hungaroring, 70 Laps

1. Webber Red Bull-Renault 1h41:05.571
2. Alonso Ferrari + 17.821
3. Vettel Red Bull-Renault + 19.252
4. Massa Ferrari + 27.474
5. Petrov Renault + 1:13.100
6. Hulkenberg Williams-Cosworth + 1:16.700
7. De la Rosa Sauber-Ferrari + 1 lap
8. Button McLaren-Mercedes + 1 lap
9. Kobayashi Sauber-Ferrari + 1 lap
10. Barrichello Williams-Cosworth + 1 lap
11. Schumacher Mercedes + 1 lap
12. Buemi Toro Rosso-Ferrari + 1 lap
13. Liuzzi Force India-Mercedes + 1 lap
14. Kovalainen Lotus-Cosworth + 3 laps
15. Trulli Lotus-Cosworth + 3 laps
16. Glock Virgin-Cosworth + 3 laps
17. Senna HRT-Cosworth + 3 laps
18. Di Grassi Virgin-Cosworth + 4 laps
19. Yamamoto HRT-Cosworth + 4 laps

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159 Comments
  1. Paul Mc says:

    As a long time Schumi fan, after today I am no longer supporting Schumacher.

    A disgraceful pre-meditated move. He should be banned for Spa. A sad and desperate attempt to defend which pretty much sums up this year.

    Rubens is a good guy he didn’t deserve that.

    1. Chris says:

      A fair point, but as just said on the F1 Forum, does Vettel not do exactly the same thing off the start line usually? A case of Schumi being in the firing line simply because of his history?

      1. Andy says:

        At the start line the speeds are considerably lower. A completely different thing.

      2. Immi1974uk says:

        Not only are speeds slower but more room is given! This outrage would be for any driver making that move.

      3. VV says:

        So because another driver does something bad, that legitimatises what Schumacher did?

        Schumacher is in the firing line because his move was unnecessary, dangerous and a bad example to the younger drives who lionise him.

        The only (informed) people who defend Schumacher are Brawn and Haug. Everyone else who’s spoken on the subject has condemned it. Including the stewards, whose opinions count for slightly more than yours.

    2. Banjo says:

      Well said, he should have closed the gap before Rubens had a chance to move into it, rather than try and force him into a concrete wall. Rubens deserved his point today.

    3. senna says:

      how convenient.You take your decision when he is finished with f1. Why didn’t you choose to do that when he crashed with hill, or villeneuve, or when he parcked at la rascasse? You make your decission now when he is ready to retire for good.

      1. Paul Mc says:

        Nothing convenient about it. I’ve supported Michael through the good and the bad. Today was a different story. You cannot compare the low speed crashes with hill and villeneuve or with a parking incident. He could have easily killed Rubens today. I’m still stunned by it. It wasn’t a championship fight with a rival it was for a solitary point. Terrible

      2. Paul Kirk says:

        I agree it looked very risky and dangerous. But (even though I’m not a Sandshoefixer fan), I’m wondering if because he was so focused on his mirror, and not looking ahead, he might have misjudged how close to the wall he was getting. You’ll notice that he very suddenly vered left, once the two cars were side by side, which hints that he suddenly realised how close they were to the wall. To be honest, (as Shui says), I cannot see any racing driver doing what Shui appeared to do to Baracello on purpose, it was just so incredibly dangerous, so I’m prepared to accept that it was a misjudgment.
        PK.

    4. AlexD says:

      Strange that you decide to stop supporting him now….is he really different? I was supporting Schumacher when he was driving for Ferrari…and I need to say that he is done nothing different today vs what he have done so many times back in history….

      1. Bert says:

        Exactly, he was just as dirty 10 years ago as he is now. It’s a trait of who Schumacher is.

        The flawed hero.

  2. Jonny Kiehlmann says:

    James, what do you think the chances are of Mercedes and/or Renault picking up a (non-suspended) race ban?

    Their pitlane incidents were incredibly dangerous. It’s amazing no one was hurt, and worse, it’s the result of the same problem many many teams have been repeatedly penalised for throughout the year. An example should be made.

    1. senna says:

      money is what the fia want.

      1. Marktwopenny says:

        I think a Renault guy was distracted by rolling wheel that went off Rosberg’s car. That’s how they can justify themseleves.

    2. Nesto says:

      I’m disappointed by the small fines. Renault were banned because of Alonso’s tire coming off ON the racetrack and NO ONE was hit by it. But that of course was another knee jerk reaction by the FIA after Surtees and Massa. This time there was actual contact by the wheel, a pit crew member and the cars. Hamilton should have been fined earlier this year when he and Vettel almost collided and Hamilton went sideways at the William’s pit coincidentally. Imagine if he didn’t get it back ??

      Inside the pit area is a very dangerous place and punishments should be heavy here. Its fast and frantic but safety needs to be paramount.

      1. James Allen says:

        Some good points here

      2. Nesto says:

        Almost forgot, that disastrous chain of events should be more than enough reason to close the pits when the Safety Car comes out, its a mad dash and everyone tries to take advantage. I really dislike the lottery effect of a SC release because theres been a big accident or theres debris on the track. I don’t see why that should catapult someone up the order or possibly ruin one’s race. And what was a HRT doing near the front of the pack??? Wave him through for pete’s sake!!

      3. Nika Wattinen says:

        Agreed… And what happened to the safety car waving back-markers through? The restart must be hell for the new teams, having to let the pack through, but trying to pick up the cars that they are racing…

      4. Rich C says:

        It could instantly be made safer. Just cut out 1 person off each wheel. It does not take 3 ppl to change a wheel. Other series do it with fewer, why not F1?

  3. Nathan Graham says:

    That middle stint by webber was astonishing, definitely gets my drive of the day. Whether it would’ve been enough to beat vettel who knows. As far a Schumacher’s move on Barrichello, that was despicable. The brazillian was clearly along side him when he forced him toward the wall. Good job to Rubens for having the guts and the skill to make the move stick.

    1. KlBD says:

      Indeed…a lesser man than Rubens would’ve cracked under that kind of pressure!

  4. Jeff says:

    Great drive by Mark. Sort of like when he got pole in Malaysia by doing something different. Of course it should have only got him second. Vettel had it in the bag, but found another way to lose.
    Bring on Spa, I think Red Bull will struggle at Monza though. This must be testing Vettels mental strength.

    1. Bert says:

      Redbull will be stronger at Monza this year, compared to last, but yes you are correct. It will be the toughest track for the car this season.

      The main thing though is that this year the car is strong in slow corners. So instead of two weaknesses at Monza like last year, they will only have one. Power and straight line speed. F duct won’t help them much.

      McLaren will be quickest car through Blanchimont in Spa and will be quickest in Monza. The next two races will be interesting.

      Shame about the 4 week break though. My biggest concern will be a procession, in which we ask.. “we waited 4 weeks for that???”

      1. Faisal says:

        Procession is pretty much possible. Although Spa is a great circuit itself, the racing here hasn’t been of any great quality if compared to Montreal,Suzuka and Interlagos.

    2. Immi1974uk says:

      I totally agree Jeff.

      However – JA, I don’t understand the tone of your article with regards Vetel. It makes it sound like Vetel had the race basically stolen from him by a ‘technicality’ and the stewards.

      The rule for keeping close is there for a good reason is it not? It could be argued that him breaking this rule cost Alonso a chance at beating Webber even if it wouldn’t have changed his result.

      This was not a grey area that the stewards exploited to give an unfair penalty. He broke a clear rule, that he definitely should know and the penalty for that is also well known.

      It frustrates me that Vetel continues to get away with acting like a petulant child when he makes a mistake. I know that he is young but surely at some stage someone has to call him on his behaviour towards his team and his team mate when he mucks up.

      I don’t see it when the media constantly says he will be a brilliant Driver’s WC this year. I personally hope it doesn’t happen as I think he needs some growing time. Currently he seems to lack reality and personal responsibility on the track for his actions. Those sort of traits end up making World Champions who drive into people to complete there goal. He seems to be on track for this which would be a great shame because he could be so much more.

      1. James Allen says:

        Not at all, he should have known the rules and he accepted that after the race. But I think a casual viewer would think that it was quite a heavy penalty for something which seems quite minor.

  5. Peter Clarke says:

    Great win for Webber, amazing middle section of the race, deserving victory for making your own luck. Good to see that karma catches up with some people. Was concerned about the reasoning behind not getting him to pit under safety car, but it all fell his way. Now the leader in the championship, will he now become the number one driver at Red Bull. it is playing out to be an interesting season. Go Mark

    1. Galapago555 says:

      Yep, fully agree but… are teams allowed to have a #1 and a #2 driver? I thought that team orders were banned ;-)

      By the way, I have heard Jenson strongly whinning about his car’s performance. I am waiting to read lots of comments from British fans saying he is a “petulant child” who is “throwing the toys” just because things are not the way he wants, and reminding that this kind of comments are not to be made publicly… sorry, I was wrong, he is NOT a Spaniard!!

      1. drums says:

        I cannot agree more with you, Galapago555. And with Senna here below, except with the banning supposition. I saw today an extract of the Alonso’s chasing by some B. journos after Germany GP and I felt Spanish shame, that is, shame on behalf of others. And, they say S. journos are ‘the’ rubbish!

      2. Andy says:

        Did he complain about his fellow drivers, ordering his team to make sure they get penalties, whine about stewards manipulating the race against him?

        There is whining, and then there is whining….

      3. Galapago555 says:

        Who are you thinking of when you say “ordering his team to make sure they get penalties”??? Btw, I remember this vary same track, three years ago… you must be talking ’bout Lewis!!

      4. Zobra Wambleska says:

        Galapago, I don’t know why you feel it necessary to continually play this anti British race card. Seems to me you’re the one throwing the toys.

    2. senna says:

      with the british media doing the witch hunt at the post race interview at the german gp. James what are your thoughts on that. I imagine you were there. And i imagine you will moderate my comment by not showing it.

      1. James Allen says:

        It was what you’d expect from the media pack we have in F1. It wasn’t a witch hunt

      2. rafa says:

        Sorry james to contradict you on this one, but I think that a lot of the questions in that interview were over the top, really over the top. It’s just my feeling but if that had happened with any other driver there wouldn’t have been such outrageous darts thrown at them, barring of course Schumacher.

      3. James Allen says:

        I don’t agree. I know the journos in question and they have nothing against Alonso personally or because he’s not British, they just go for a story. If any other driver had been in Alonso’s position he would have got those questions.

      4. James H says:

        As James has said – the media want stories and nothing else – Alonso has proven that he is a rather good source of them albeit for the worng reasons.

      5. drums says:

        Has it? Depending on the judge.

  6. Nando says:

    Didn’t understand Vettel backing off to give him room to set the fastest lap, there wasn’t much chance of him passing Alonso in the closing laps obviously but he gave himself no chance of passing just to satisfy his ego.

    1. Sam B says:

      Well it’s the Hungaroring where overtaking is practically impossible (one attempt did stick, but that could nearly have been a Williams pounded onto the wall—Schumacher’s crazy). So yeah, I guess he did back off to set the FL as a consolation, but he didn’t sacrifice a chance to pass in the process, because the chance wasn’t there at all.

      1. Gary says:

        I never saw him even try to get into position for one … NOT the right driver to get to have ‘red 5′

        And why does Vettel not know the rules? It beggars belief that someone at that level wouldn’t – what a stupid way to lose a race (but at least his team did, although you wouldn’t know it from the way he said “we didn’t win”)

      2. David says:

        Vettel only uses we when he loses, like we had a bad start today, we made an error behind teh safety car. Contrast this when he says I drove teh car perfectly to get pole, I raced very well to win today. Two words come to mind; spoilt and brat.

  7. Erik ( Brazil ) says:

    Schumacher lost my last grain of respect with that move, risk killing someone to defend 10th place?

    1. Thomas, Canada says:

      Agreed. Schumacher wrongly got away with similar moves in his heyday – remember Hakkinen at Spa, Alonso at Silverstone, we could go one for a while with this list. Now it looks like desperation.

      The move on Rubens was outrageous. A few more inches and the accident would have been massive and possibly deadly – God knows what it would have been like if a car was coming out the pits at the same time.

      Schumacher should get a race ban for extreme dangerous driving.

      1. Flintster says:

        Nice one Schumacher – taken the heat off Ferrari – keep it up….ha

      2. Gemma says:

        risk a life for Any place…..

  8. Steed says:

    Rubens asked on BBC for the public to vote on whether he or Schumi was right in their respective analysis of the overtake. Can you facilitate? For me Rubens was always the good guy – no different this time . .

    1. Henry says:

      It is also being investigated by the stewards, I predict a grip penalty at the next race? hopefully not some useless fine to the man who was the highest paid sportsman in the world for a few years!

  9. JimmiC says:

    Mega race, very exciting, Mick Dastardly striking again just like the old days, and chaos in the pit lane.

    For all the scrutiny that will surround Schuey and Vettel’s penalty (loved his reaction – giving it the ‘tommy tanker’ fist down the pit) I think the greatest analysis and investigation needs to go to the pit lane fiasco – cars driving into each other and nearly wiping out a pit crew and tyres flying about.

    I’d be curious to see what penalty Michael will get. Kobayashi made an admin error and got a five place penalty, Schumacher risked sending Rubens to the moon… perhaps a grid penalty for two races instead of just the one?

  10. Roger Korn says:

    Schumacher’s move on Barrichello was the most vicious move I’ve ever seen. Sure, Schui didn’t want to give up that final point, or his reputation as a fierce competitor, but the risk-reward calculation was stupid. And I’ve been a Schumacher fan ever since his karting days!

  11. Steve says:

    Could Vettle have been more ungracious in the post race interviews? What a pratt. Someone at RB needs to take him aside and tell him to pull his head in before he looses all his non-German fan.

    1. Sam B says:

      Could’ve been worse. He could’ve clogged someone at the waiting room, which he looked capable of doing at some point. At least he found it in himself to congratulate Mark.

      James, he said he lost the radio communication. This might be a silly question, but does that sort of thing happen a lot? Seeing him hurdle the curb like that to make a pit stop, I wouldn’t be surprised if the impact affected the radio line.

      1. Mark M says:

        Yes radios in single seaters with carbon tubs do have regular probelems , but the point is Vettel having said that his readio failed earlier should have relied on his own eyes.
        He could have seen that Webber was well ahead and his excuse tat he thought there would be another lap of the safety car was amateurish.
        Any driver from Junior days knows that you need to keep up with the car in front for safety car restart.

        Fastest driver slowest learner

      2. Trent says:

        Was the radio really broken? We heard it later in the race!

      3. James Allen says:

        And we heard it when he asked why he had a penalty

    2. Gemma says:

      He looked like a sulking child! He addmitted himself that he was ‘sleeping’, so he only has himself to blame!

      1. geth says:

        Maybe FIA need a new rule – no sleeping in a F1 car.

      2. Daniel B says:

        LOL that my friend is excellent.

    3. ScooterMcGee says:

      I found it interesting that Vettel’s engineer felt he needed to come over the radio and tell Vettel to behave himself when he got out of the car…

  12. Monji says:

    Lewis Hamilton, is by far the best driver on the field in my opinion, after what I’ve seen today, he managed to stay close to Fernando in a MUCH quicker car and could have salvage 3nd if he was still in the race, every other driver around him has a better car but he’s still 2nd in the championship and his teammate is where any other good driver should be.

    He’s really blessed.

  13. lw343 says:

    watching this in my living room with my best mate here in australia i can say i havent felt as tense since germany ’09. Fantastic drive from Mark, well deserved. I’m on cloud nine to be honest.

    1. taylormichaelj says:

      Hear, hear – go Mark you good thing!!

      I watched the whole race standing up in front of the telly – couldn’t sit down!

      When he wins its like winning a grand final – any boss who sacks his worker for not turning up today…………….

      Great drive – I’ve been getting up in the middle of the night to watch Grand Prix ever since Alan Jones won, so it sure is sweet to see an Aussie up there at the tippy top.

      Very happy today – bring on the championship mate – you can do it!!!!!!

  14. Banjo says:

    Didn’t Kobayashi start from the back of the grid, after he got a grid penalty for driving through the red light in the pits yesterday ? Either way, his drive was fantastic – from the back to 9th – sensational. A lot of good candidates for driver of the day today.

    I think we all know who’s going to get ‘most dangerous move’ of the day though.

    1. Gemma says:

      I agree it would be interesting to see Kobayashi in a decent seat?!

  15. Kenny says:

    well done Mark!!! great result!!!

  16. Bluey from Oz says:

    Go you good thing !!!!! well done to Mark. Australia is very proud of you – well worth staying up till 1am in the morning to watch you race (and to type this). Fantastic second sector of the race that won it. Gee that second had chasis is a winner ;-))

    As for Seb, the lights on the Safety Car are not there for decoration – if he had lost radio communications (?), why was he not watching the Safety Car ? and sticking to the back of MW ?

    And as for Schumacher – that was the most dangerous and unsportsman-like conduct that i have seen. Rubens, apart from a change of jocks after the race, needs to let rip with the crap that he has put up with from Schumacher over the years. Then let the public decide !

  17. Teaflax says:

    One good thing about Schumacher’s move: it clearly shows (yet again) what a mercenary and unsporting driver he is. With his incredible stats, it seems that many people slowly forget after each individual incident that this is exactly how he’s always been.

    The worst part is how many people seem to like him *because* of this kind of behavior. That the willingness to do whatever it takes to win, no matter what rules or basic tenets of good sportsmanship say, is an admirable quality.

    A minimum of a one-race suspension, I would say.

  18. Grey says:

    Great drive by Webber, he made the most of his opportunity and brought home the win. Vettel manages to lose the race. Again. Compare the post race – Webber gracious, admits he got lucky; Vettel’s performance on the podium was pathetic.

    Shumacher’s move on Barichello shows the leopard never changes his spots. Very lucky not to cause a nasty accident.

  19. Ben Miller says:

    James,

    What’s your opinion on the RB6 in terms of where it ranks against other dominant F1 cars of the past? You commented yesterday that it was near enough perfect during qualifying.

    Although its fragile at times, it is on or near the money at every type of circuit. When their car is not thought to be suited to certain tracks they are still in with a shout of winning, but at tracks like we saw today their performance advantage is insane. Comparing it to the Brawn last year who had a DDD, they have a bigger advantage than they enjoyed and thats with the competition all having similar components. If Red Bull don’t win a title with this car, would Horner’s position be under threat?

    1. James Allen says:

      They have thrown everything at winning the title this year. The technical team has been very stable there over the last few years and there is a lot of creativity in the team

      1. JimmiC says:

        Do they have the resources to also develop for next year as well, or are they putting everything into this car?

      2. AlexD says:

        James, based on your experience, will we ever know 110% why RB6 is so quick? I mean in 5-10 years from now?

        One thing I do not understand, how can you gain 1.5 sec in just one week? Maybe this track did suit them…maybe they have build the car in a way that the set up can be adjusted so differently to give such gains?

        I do not know whether anybody has any clue what makes this car so fast…

      3. Irish con says:

        I think at tracks like Canada Bahrain and Germany last week they had to trim their downforce levels to be half competitive on the straights due to the fact they don’t have any straight line speed and this week was all about who has the most downforce and straight line speed doesn’t matter a tap. Not sure yet who will be fastest at spa. Red bull will obviously be mega in sector 2 there but Ferrari and mclaren may be able to race them up the hill on the first lap. Monza will be a struggle for them Id say tho

  20. Parthi says:

    Great to see Mark finally catch a bit of luck, especially on his 150th start!

  21. Olivier says:

    … wow, that was the scariest move I’ve ever seen! Even better than the infamous Alonso-Schumacher move. Rubens sure has some balls!

    Good to see Schumi back on the edge. This is what F1 should be all about: Heart stopping moments (with happy endings).

  22. Ayron says:

    Another interesting race with a lot going on. Now that Schumacher isn’t a contender or some mythical hero, hopefully he will be held properly accountable for his dangerous move on Rubens.

    Well done Webber and Red Bull for finding a way to get him ahead of Alonso. Shame that Vettel stuffed the restart, I hope he didn’t suffer apenalty trying to create some extra gap for Webber’s run – he will be extra unhappy if that’s the case. Horner has denied this already and radio chat would probably give it away if so.

    Poor race for Mercedes with Rosberg’s tyre and Schumacher’s lunacy. hopefully they can get it together for the last stretch of races and make a genuine play at being a top team.

    Great result for Petrov and a poor race for Kubica who was already struggling a little before his team caused him to crash. They should be a more mature team than that and Kubica maybe lacked a little maturity in the face of his teammate’s performance this weekend.

    Good to see the back end of the field all finish this race. Hopefully they will start to turn their reliability into performance and close the gap to the established teams.

    1. velvet_demon says:

      Care to explain when Kubica shows lack of maturity?

      1. Ayron says:

        Agreed, a bit hard on Kubica. The coverage I watched suggested he was not particularly happy with the way qualifying went – particularly being out-performed by Petrov.

        Wasn’t sure about the full extent of the damage situation to his car either till today. I am, so far extremely impressed with him as a driver and competitor and hope that Renault can give him the machinery for him to maximise that talent on the track

  23. Brian says:

    Commanding performance from Mark. Shows he has the mental strength Vettel seems to lack

    1. James H says:

      Difference bewteen a man and a boy. Vettel will get there but has some maturing to do.

      1. Nesto says:

        Exactly. I think people forget how young Vettel is… not to mention Hamilton and Alonso of these last few years when they berate their attitudes and cockiness. Its those same traits thats gotten them where they are today. Not all the drivers are the same and I prefer a passionate driver as opposed to say Raikkonen. Hes entertaining in his own way but I prefer a fiery nature to coolness and -ness LOL

  24. KidrA says:

    Like I’ve said before this season, Schumacher was fast and dangerous, now he’s slow and more dangerous. Without the help from FIA and teamorders there’s no way for Schuamcher to shine again. I wonder what motivates him, I hope he didn’t come back just someone to get hurt.
    Think when someone would have come from the pits at the same time? There would have been really huge accident cause of the speed difference of the cars and Rubens could have not seen his 300th GP. Luckily it didn’t happen.

  25. Jez Playense says:

    Schumacher looking increasingly desperate, and achieving nothing. Apart from confirming everything we all knew. Go Rubens!

  26. Thomas, Canada says:

    What’s the deal with the trophies this year? Both the trophy today and last week in Germany are God awful replica’s of the race sponsors logo, which is crass in the extreme.

    Was there not some sort of rule that the trophy couldn’t look like the sponsors logo? Call me old fashioned, but I like the British and also the Australian trophies.

  27. terryshep says:

    It looks as though this is a championship to be decided by how many points you lose rather than how many you win.

    BTW James, do you think Michael Schumacher knows any Dylan Thomas? Pity if your literary allusion is wasted on him.

    1. James Allen says:

      That is a very good point

  28. d.h. says:

    A quality race which bordered on keystone cops at times, wheels bouncing down the lane, lollipop man not doing his job, manic safety car pitstops, vettel again clutching defeat from the jaws of victory!

    And Michael schumacher, the man was ruthless, now he is a complete disaster waiting to happen. Rubens was very lucky.

  29. Brent McMaster says:

    They should pull Schumachers licence he is obviously senile. Hill, Villenueve, Monaco were all disgusting, but this endangered life. I want to see hard punishment.

  30. J. Potocki says:

    I must say that the first part of the race was on the dull side, but then with the incidents in the pits and the subsequent safety car it turned into a half decent race.
    Again Vettel showed what spoiled winy little brat he is. You could see what Alsonso and Webber think of him by the expressions on their faces as he was going on and on not only at the post race interview but when they were getting ready to go to the podium.
    Don’t like him (Vettel) and after today’s demonstration of bad sportsmanship it’s turning into hate. I hope Webber crushes him in the remaining races.
    I also hope that the FIA come down hard on that arrogant Schumacher.

  31. Ral says:

    I think Kobayashi qualified 18th, but with the 5-place grid penalty he started from 23d. He had an amazing first lap and actually Sauber in general seem to have really be performing quite well in the pit and on strategies.

    Good performance from Petrov and Hulkenberg and it’s a good day points-wise for Williams as well. Interesting race, unlike some at the Hungaroring in the past.

  32. leukocyte says:

    A bit of good luck for Webber but a thoroughly deserved win. Vettel has been a serial offender behind the safety car in the past and it’s hard to be sympathetic despite the cost of his penalty today.

  33. drums says:

    James, a propos of Vettel’s penalty you wrote “It was very hard on Vettel, who lost a race win through a rules technicality”. Yet Vettel was retaining all cars but Webber’s behind SC and therefore giving advantage to his team mate. Did Vettel acted voluntarely in doing this? He shall know better. But the important rule breaking was there to be punished. That Webber had a highest race pace than the rest of the pack does not attenuate the fact that when he went into the track after changing tyres eventually he had just three seconds advantage on the follower, no matter who were it.

    1. Ayrton says:

      I was also wondering if Vettel acted voluntarily on this. Clearly Webber benefited from the room Vettel was creating… Either way, it was Vettel’s mistake to make the gap to big and as much as anyone can criticize him for his demeanor after the race, at least he should get some credit for acknowledging it had been his fault, unlike other characters that are always complaining about how it was everybody else’s fault but them when things don’t go their way…

    2. Nando says:

      I wonder how soon he was informed about a possible penalty? He didn’t try and go slow and hold up Alonso after the restart which is what you would expect if he’d deliberately backed the field up to help Webber. But he wasn’t going all-out until the investigation signal was given which would suggest he wasn’t warned about a possible penalty before that.
      The penalty did seem a while in coming must of been 5 laps maybe, guess they were looking at the pit-lane incidents first.

  34. Roger Carballo AKA Archtrion says:

    Let me say this….. Vettel’s penalty can’t be equal to Hamilton’s safety car overtaking penalty…. There’s a world in terms of what is the severity of the rule infringement between those two.

    1. Paul says:

      couldnt agree more and also vettel was not directly behind the safety car.

      1. Nesto says:

        He should have been blackflagged as in GP2. the FIA and stewards sicken me when they seemingly can’t punish him the proper way. I don’t believe he was even summoned to the stewards afterwards right ? I wonder if his “confused by blinking lights and beeping” statement would have flown with them but apparently they didn’t care enough to ask.

        Lets see, lose P2 to Alonso because of need to change front wing or wait… use the SC as a pick? Problem solved!

  35. Heffalump says:

    Schumacher’s defending was way too hard, there is no doubt about that.
    But before everyone puts down their damning verdict: did Mark Webber leave Sebastian Vettel that much more room in Istanbul?

    1. geth says:

      LOL, Mark did run straight forward – that is a big difference.

    2. Nesto says:

      LOL they were in the middle of the track when they collided and that was cuz Vettel tried pushing Webbo and he stood his ground. Completely Vettel’s fault there.

      That said, I’ve disliked Webber a lot the last few years for his constant pushing other driver’s to the wall when hes about to be overtaken at the end of the start/finish straight.

    3. Grey says:

      Webber held his racing line, Vettel turned into him. Schumacher can be seen to check his mirror and then deliberately move over. Vettel was more like Schumacher in this comparison…

  36. Thalasa says:

    Regarding Schumacher’s murder attempt on Barrichello, we could say something very politically incorrect if we think of what the later carries on his helmet.
    I hope he gets a heavy penalty for that. He is just dirty. No longer a champion.

    Very happy about Webber he deserves it. Vettel should stop doing the No 1 signal whenever he gets on pole. Keep it for when you win, kid.

    Does anyone think Hamilton stretched his car’s performance too far? Is it that he is too good for his car, or is Button under performing?

  37. amit says:

    Hello James,

    Vettel seems to be making a habbit of deliberately kicking the axe, seven pole positions and just one win. I feel it is things like these that ultimately take a toll on drivers confidence and eventually effect his driving. What’s the point of being much faster than your team mate if you cannot beat him on Sunday.

    Webber’s ” not bad for a no. 2 driver…” comment seems even more bizzare considering how he comes out shining, in worst of conditions and hoe it is always the other way round for Vettel. He (Vettel) must be exasperated by now, every time he is about to take the lead/mantel something goes wrong for him. One can only hope he won’t let it affect him. certainly did well at the post race conference. By the way why was Mark webber acting like a class monitor, shrugging at the way Alonso and Vettle sat (leg on the laps, even if it is not proper etiquette, its none of his business. Or maybe i am just overreacting :)

    Finally, whats wrong with Michael Schumacher, he was rubbing dirt in the face of his critics untill he pulled that move on Barichello. That’s totaly unacceptable, it was way too dangerous, i think he’s gonna receive a lot of stick for it. On the other hand if he’d let Ruben’s through, he’d have still made his point, Rubens was almost three seconds a lap faster than him, still took him almost four laps to make a pass. As always, would love your take on the issue. Thanks

    1. James Allen says:

      I agree on Vettel, but remember he’s only 23.

  38. Sunburntgringo says:

    I think it is interesting that the emotional and maybe hotheaded drivers today were both German. What does that say? Schumi needs something strong to happen to him and Vettel needs his ego readjusted. If Schumi is not reprimanded, that brings the sport into ill repute more than team orders ever will.

  39. chuck says:

    Is Vettel retarded? Seriously? If he didn’t have average driving abilities I don’t believe he has the mental capacity to do anything else. Perhaps it’s just me, but he always sounds and acts like he just has no clue.

    1. James Allen says:

      On the contrary, he is one of the most intelligent drivers in F1

      1. James H says:

        He needs to mature rapidly if he’s to convert his talent into titles.

      2. Gemma says:

        I agree but as James said he is only 23, and people used to say similar things about Massa and Jenson and they soon matured. Hopefully it will just take one frustrating 2010 season to starighten his head, a bit like it did to Lewis after a difficult ’09 season for him?!

      3. Gary says:

        I just can’t picture a driver who waggles his hands about in such a childish way when he makes stupid mistakes as World Champion … he’s incredibly quick on a clear track, yes, and can pull out amazing qualifying laps at the last moment … but is he the best racer? He has to grow up first, I think.

  40. Nando says:

    What about one of the Hispania’s backing up Hamilton at the restart, Alonso was about as far ahead of the Hispania as Webber was. Didn’t they used to let the lapped cars pass the safety car so they didn’t get in the way?

  41. Sam B says:

    James, is it realistic the FIA will issue a one-race suspension for Schumacher’s move on Barrichello? A fine or a five-grid penalty doesn’t seem harsh enough. And it’s not the first totally unsporting move he pulled this season.

  42. PaulL says:

    I thought that was one of the most outstanding overtakes of the season – we have seen some good ones too.

    Well done Rubens, you’re a wonderful contributor.

  43. Baktru says:

    Interesting race. Not at all what I had expected from a race at Hungaroring with the fastest cars starting at the front.

    My plusses:

    - Webber: He had a fenomenal race there, doing everything right. At some point in the race I thought Alonso actually stood a chance, but nope. Webber beat them all today with a very good drive.

    - Barrichello: Overtaking the Schum on a track where overtaking is impossible, and in what way. Barri may not be the youngest but he is definitely a real racing driver.

    - Kobayashi: Made it into the points from 23rd, that alone deserves a ‘+’

    My minuses:

    - Schumacher: What on earth was that? Schum has always been known to be ruthless but his block on Barrichello was beyond words. I’ve never been a fan of Schum and today only reinforced my ideas on that.

    - Mercedes: What happened with that wheel on Rosberg’s car? Yes, it must have been a stressy situation in the pits at the time but that should really not happen. On par with Massa leaving the pits with the fuel hose still attached.

    - Renault: When they released Kubica. The potential for a major accident was there, luckily it didn’t happen.

    Positive honourable mention: Vettel showed truly human reactions when he didn’t understand why he had a drive-through at first, and later his disappointment in the press interviews. The human side shone through and it was a good thing. And yes, I noted some other comments disagree. So be it.

    Negative honourable mention: The Hungaroring. When people say it is ‘impossible’ to overtake there, that SHOULD be a negative thing. Point in case? Barrichello was 3.5 seconds faster than Schum when he caught up with him and he could only overtake many laps later in a very dangerous maneuver. Vettel was clearly faster than Alonso and didn’t even try, after all, what’s the point in trying to overtake on Hungaroring… Clearly, I still don’t like this track.

    In the end though, the race was interesting thanks to the SC triggered by Liuzzi. Without that? I’m pretty sure it would have been an easy RB 1-2 after the pitstops.

  44. EM says:

    There’s got to be a case for Sebastian Vettel to be the most disappointing driver of the season so far.

    He’s had the class car of the field for most of the season and is naturally faster than Mark Webber but has shown a severe lack of race craft all season long.

    From his coming together with Webber in Turkey to his botched starts in Britian and Germany he channels his aggression in the wrong way. Today you could see him annoyed and out of shape.

    If he kept his head better he’d be in a commanding lead by now.

    1. Sam B says:

      At least, we’re in for some racing hopefully until the end of the season.

      The title is still very much for the taking. It’s looking closer this year than it did at this point last year. Ferrari looks to be on the way up, and McLaren still has enough time to make a turnaround.

      Ultimately, it looks like we’re in for a battle between the two Red Bulls. Webber clearly has the momentum and experience. Vettel has three weeks to pull himself together. If his performance last year is anything to go by, he’ll be more focused in the last seven races. Already, he’s qualifying stronger. He just needs to keep up his mental strength to convert poles to wins.

      Man, three weeks to Spa is damn long.

  45. PaulL says:

    What’s been interesting this year has been the consistency of performance difference between the teammates compared to say 2007 when Raikkonen/Massa and Hamilton/Alonso flip-flopped quite often race-to-race.

  46. mo kahn says:

    It was clear case of Vettel helping Webber build a good three to four seconds on restart… which was extremely sporting of him. Redbull was clearly class of the field. But the driver who was class of the field was Alonso. Having a faster car (a second faster per lap) behind him he still managed to salvage second… My question is where was Massa compared to Alonso? Fourth !! courtesy Hamilton’s machine faliure? And I wonder why Massa and Rubens are such cry babies? Mind you these two are from the same country that gave us Ayrton Senna, Nelson Piquet (Sr), Fitipaldi and the ones who we adored. These cry baby antics are such a killjoy in a sport of men.

    True Rubens was done dangerously wrong with Schuey, but how you respond to it counts, which was the same when he went on whinning about how button was faster than him last year while with Brawn and how Honda was undrivable the year preceeding that. Similar to Massa’s latin soap opera in Germany.

    I like the way Alonso, Hamilton, Kubica, Schuey (though he goes overboard on occassions, like he did today) and Kimi (bring him back for F1′s sake) Fight.

    SPA & MONZA: Where the brave dare… bring it on.. will miss Kimi Raikkonnen… he is the king of Spa.

    Enjoy

    1. Paul says:

      Very with you on missing the king of Spa

  47. drums says:

    Webber drove incredibly today. RBS are in a league of their own, but Webber added snow to the cake by preserving his soft tyres soo well! Vettel couldn’t overtake Alonso, which says a lot of both drivers. I’m not criticising Seb for this, regarding he is younger, arguable more impulsive, and was for sure raging after being penalysed. Yet the real danger came from Schuemi today. Schuemi at his worst. I was frozen when I saw him, on TV slow motion, looking into the right side rear mirror in order to calculate the closing for Rubens. IMHO this man looses a sense whilst racing. A pilot can be rough, but not foolish. He remembered me De Jong’s look at Xabi Alonso’s body whilst fixing up the infamous kick into the chest.

  48. Lewis Jones says:

    I think what was interesting is that Sebastian first seemed to blamed his team (radio problems?!?) and then his team-mate for driving away quickly as the Safety Car pulled in before grudgingly admitting that he might have been the one at fault. Being quick to blame others does not a World Champion make. Perhaps Red Bull should put their support behind Mark to see off the challenge from Fernando (and, hopefully, McLaren) in 2010.

  49. mo kahn says:

    Few tweets going around about Shuey:

    Schumacher has a car bumper sticker that reads “If you can read this then I haven’t put you in the wall yet”

    Schumacher penalised 10 spots on the grid for attempted murder

    Schumacher on the radio today: “Why is Rubens passing me? Tell him to stop!”. Brawn: “He’s not on our team Michael…..”

    Michael Schumacher texts Felipe Massa the phrase “Number two driver” every half an hour.

    LOVE THE LAST ONE :)

  50. Loti says:

    Sorry,I don’t have the energy to read through all the comments but I would just like to say that that was another race fixed by race control and the safety car.

  51. Alex says:

    There is a pattern here re: Vettel. He is extremely fast on qualifying and when he has no traffic, but in race conditions he simply loses it when he is being pressured by other drivers. He appears to lack the mental toughness and the cool that would be necessary to become a champion. I don’t think this year will be his and would put my money on Webber. It is a shame that Hamilton had that breakdown, as he does have the necessary talent to be pressuring Webber for the points race. Alonzo may blip here and there, but he is driving more and more as a spoilt child. He is not untalented, but he needs to get over his sense of entitlement. Massa seems to have fallen into the role of second driver which actually fits him well. He is also not champion material, but he makes a hell of a second driver for a top team (all in all a sweet deal, given that he drives a Ferrarri and gets a hell of a paycheck).

    1. drums says:

      Alonso, not Alonzo. Always blipping.

    2. Paul says:

      What a load of nonsense about vettel you need to watch the race well he was just unlucky and didnt you read james post come on!

      1. Zobra Wambleska says:

        Not paying attention to what’s going on can’t be classified as unlucky. Maybe he’s unlucky to have attention deficit disorder?

  52. Nikhil says:

    After watching the entire race I believe that Vettel lost the race cause of team orders. Had there been no team orders vettel would never have left such a big gap between him and webber even for the argument of warming up tyres. He would have tugged to webbers rear constantly cause the last thing he would want is being beaten by his team mate. Cause Vettel started to up his pace in order to built a gap between him and Alonso once steward intervened.Till then he never made an attempt to close gap of 6 to7 sec to Webber i.e assuming he mistimed safety car exit.Immediately after stewards decesion he set fastest lap. RedBull gambeled for Webber getting ahead of Alonso at the expense of Vettle which they will regret after they lose the WDC championship to Alonso cause their drivers are taking points of each other which will in turn benefit Alonso.

    1. Noel says:

      I disagree for a couple of reasons.

      Firstly all driver comms are now monitored and in the wake of AlonsoIsFasterThanYouGate if RBR tried to manipulate the result we probably would’ve heard it by now and the press would be in a lather.

      Secondly, there’s just no way Seb would help out his team mate to salvage a bag a points even if the team told him to. He just wouldn’t, especially given that Mark is now driving Seb’s old chassis.

      Finally, as a general rule if the root cause of a suspicious situation is a choice between conspiracy and incompetence, it’s usually incompetence. Even in F1.

  53. Mike says:

    Schumacher’s defence was dangerous and he has rightly been penalised for it. So how come Vettel has got away with similar manoeuvres at the start of races this season? Surely there is a risk of an even greater accident at the start of the race or is it just ignored because it is the start of the race?

    Secondly, Senna premeditated a collision with Prost to win a world championship and yet is held in extremely high regard for his win at all costs attitude. Schumacher has also had this kind of attitude throughout his career and is seemingly hated for it. I don’t really understand F1 fans’ logic in this? Could someone please explain? Or is it simply a case of the Senna days being remembered through rose tinted specs.

    1. BobF1 says:

      I remember how Senna drove. Almost ran Prost into a concrete wall at 190 mph. His win at all costs attitude was a complete turn off, as is Schumacher’s attitude. In the states, Dale Earnhardt was that way in stock cars.

      Although I appreciate the talent all three had, I lost a lot of respect for all of them because they were dirty drivers. In all three cases, they didn’t have to drive like that, they had the talent to be champions without dangerous and unsportsmanlike stunts.

  54. Rob Ford says:

    A much better race today with all of the variables coming in to play, to make it more than a mere procession. A great race from Mark Webber who does appear to be a hard working down to earth Aussie who is now really fired up to deliver the best result possible given the prevailing circumstances. The change in the points system this year is also making it a much closer game for the drivers championship in 2010.

  55. Adam says:

    We missed what could have been an epic battle between Webber and Vettel. Webber having completed his superb stint on soft tyres would have just joined ahead of Vettel, who would have quickly closed the gap between himself and Webber.

    1. JR says:

      Vettel wasn’t even able to attempt a move on Alonso who was more than one second slower, so do you really think we missed an epic battle with Webber?

  56. k2san says:

    Enjoyable race… far better than expected! Great drive from a lot of people. But one thing I jut don’t understand. Vettel could drive over a second faster per lap vs Alonso and still I did not see one attempt to go for second. I really wonder if the situation was reversed if Alonso would be driving the same way; or if Hamilton would be in such a car if this would happen. There’s been a lot of talk in the past about the difficulties to overtake but this was for me very strange. It looks to me that Vettel just hasn’t got “it” yet and therefore for me doen’t quitte deserve a title this year.

  57. Oliver N says:

    Marginally off topic, but it winds me up when you hear phrases like ‘Red Bull’s 100th Grand Prix’ The team has been in existence in F1 since 1997 as Stewart, then Jaguar and now Red Bull, in that time, it has had the same factory base, and many of the core personnel have remained with the team throughout. The current success has been as a result of all of that evolution, indeed you could make an argument that it has been building on its days in FF2000 with Coulthard about 20 years ago. Just because the Austrian fizzy drink guy started picking up the tab 100 races ago doesn’t mean that previous history was erased.

    If you follow English football you will be familiar with the notion that Sky put about that top flight football started with the premiership, instead of over 100 years ago with the foundation of the football league.

  58. Grabyrdy says:

    Isn’t it curious how the “safety” car tends to provoke situations which are ten times more dangerous than whatever brought it into use ?

    I know it woke the race up, but was is really necessary today ? Don’t you think that they bring it out for any old reason, and it has more to do with tarting up the race than “safety” ?

    Does someone really have to get hurt from some of these 15 cars in the pit-lane at the same time tripping over each other for this
    to be reconsidered ?

    1. Paul says:

      well noted been thinking about this as well thin the pits should be closed during safety car periods as no need to re-fuel.

    2. Nesto says:

      I do have to say, the drivers seem to be able to react to debris on the track pretty well and sometimes accidents happen off track that don’t seem necessary to bring out a SC.

      Everyone is concerned about safety but the cars’ “safety cells” seems pretty damn reliable as evidenced by Kubica in Canada ’07 and Webber in Valencia ’10.

      Wouldn’t it be great if they just allowed them to race and used a yellow in the area ?? Similar to blue flags, I think they should just let the drivers race. The Prototypes in Le Mans seem able to handle slower traffic and it definitely spices things up. Then the front runner’s wouldn’t get a free pass to pull away from the rest of the field and start lapping everyone.

  59. Spenny says:

    I was intrigued by Vettel. While it is hard to overtake, he showed that his car was very quick. He did get overexcited and instead of pressuring Alonso into a mistake, an uncharacteristic relatively slow and steady but exceedingly accurate drive seemed to push Vettel into a sequence of mistakes. The question on Vettel’s race craft remains.

    I’m not sure whether Red Bull made a big mistake in not telling him his penalty was deserved, even if accidental. The rules on keeping together were to deal with drivers interfering with the re-start, and with Vettel not keeping pace, Alonso (and the fans) was deprived of the opportunity to attack both Webber and Vettel on the restart, even if it was an unlikely chance of the Red Bulls tripping over each other or Vettel being affected by Webber’s slipsteam. His reaction after the race was yet again that he simply could not understand why he should have got a penalty. If that is the case, he has got a big problem, or Red Bull should be advising him properly as it makes him look silly.

  60. Tim says:

    I don’t agree this season will be decided by who “loses the most points” completely. It’s a harsh way to look at it, even thoough it holds some truth.

    F1 is so strict – the rules, the regulations on components and especially tyres, the pressure on teams and drivers, the closeness of the car performance, the lack of overtaking due to reliance on aerodynamic grip… not to mention the gar. I’m not saying it hasn’t alwasy been a tough game, but gee it’s getting tougher in my opinion.

    I’s a wonder that these cars finish races at all.

    Who ever wins this champship will be well deserving. I’ll be disappointed if it’s a McLaren as they’ve been very lucky IMO to have come away with so many podiums, but at the same time, consistency is everything, even if you’re not winning every race.

    It’s a war of attrition in every aspect, and the best team/driver will win.

  61. taylormichaelj says:

    Well, as an aussie fan of F1 it is always sweet to watch a race that Mark Webber wins.

    Bad luck for Vettel, and to his credit, he took it pretty well in the end – he will mature – and he will win.
    As we know well in F1, anything can happen and Mark was able to capitalise.
    He was under a lot of pressure to build the gap on those tyres and he did really well – a deserving victory that we enjoyed very much – congrats Mark!

    Personally I think we witnessed the final, shameful demise of Michael Schumacher today. He will never be able to live down what he did today.

    In stark contrast, a great, great milestone will be celebrated at Spa when Rubens lines up for his 300th race.

    Congratulations Rubens on a magnificent achievement, you are a true hero and champion in the sport of motor racing!

  62. Nadeem says:

    What a great drive reminds me of when Shuey had to do a 3 stopper an pull out a second a lap. Stand up and be proud Australia

  63. peegee says:

    Lets connect Hungary and Germany:

    Hungary: the rule Vettel broke by lagging way a long way behind the car in front (his team mate), was put in place to stop teams manipulating the race result by having one car hold the field back, while allowing the other driver/car to gain a large advantage at restart. Team orders manipulating the race result in other words. Outcome: Immediate drive through penalty, and loss of race position, from (probable) 1st to 3rd.

    Germany: as everybody saw, Ferrari employ team orders to manipulate the race result, allowing one driver to get an advantage. Outcome: a modest fine, no loss of position. no drive through penalty.

    surely FIA need to equalise this inequality? Demote Alonso TWO positions I say. One to put him back where he was, another as punishment, and restore the public’s faith they are watching a genuine race.

    1. narikin says:

      Agree.

      BOTH rules were put there to prevent teams manipulating the race outcome. BOTH incidents broke the rules, regardless if you agree with them or not.

      Vettel/RBR broke the safety car rule, and paid a suitable penalty.

      Alonso/Ferrari broke the team order rule, and paid nothing in terms of position or points.

      I too hope FIA corrects this, and hands Alonso/ Ferrari a penalty in points, not just money.

  64. BMG says:

    Gee I neally went to bed after the first 5 laps.Best race of the year I was on the edge of my seat from lap 15 to 43. James will Hamilton get a 5 grid penalty for changing his gear box for the next race?

    1. James Allen says:

      Not if he retired from the race

  65. DJW says:

    I know the safety car is necessary and spices things up, but I can’t help feeling a bit sorry for Vettel. He had a blinding start, was comfortably in the lead and the race was his. Then through no fault of his own, the safety car comes out and wipes it all away. I know that it was his fault he was caught napping, and that was a bit daft, but even so, he wouldn’t have been in that situation in the first place. I know the safety car disadvantages different people at different times, Ferrari at Valencia for instance, but it does seem that there should be some sort of fair way of compensating people. Maybe a point for every place lost? Don’t get me wrong by the way, I like Webber better than Vettel and am glad that he won, just a little sorry for Vettel on this occasion!

  66. Fausto Cunha says:

    Actually i kind expected more mistakes from teams this year at the pit stops. With the no refuelling and the fast stops, also many cars stops on the same lap specially when the safety car is out, it´s very tricky .

    I think the penalty for Mercedes should been more arsh. That situation was very dangerous, with the wheel coming off like that and jumping arround the pits.

    It´s a shame that a car got to be arround 3 seconds faster than the car in front to be able to challenge the position.Barrichello was arround 3 seconds faster than Shumacher and it was still very dificult to overtake him. Alonso and Vettel fight could have been epic.

    Hungary always bring some drama and that has been the best part of the weekend:

    The safety car.
    Lewis DNF( very sad for that)
    The accident caused by renault in the pits.
    The jumping arround wheel.
    Vettel´s taking a nap.
    Shumacher´s being himself.

    Great race by Mark, he probably thinked that he was again on the wrong place when the safety-car came out but he made it work and the soft tyre performed beautifully.

    Actually that was my expectation for the race, watching who would have the guts to take the soft for a long stint since the harder would take some laps to warm up but the safety car enabled that for us.

  67. mtb says:

    I offer my sympathy to those drivers in inferior machinery who lost out to Button as a consequence of the safety car deployment. The eighth place that he ended up with seriously flattered his performance.
    We keep hearing how Prost-like Button is – will this twaddle now end? With the exception of 1991, where a variety of factors were at play, when did Prost put in a performance as woeful as that displayed by Button at the Hungaroring? This was typical of what Button managed in the second half of 2009. Back then, his acolytes and many journalists claimed that he was in ‘cruise-and-collect’ m ode. The same excuse can surely not be postulated this year.
    It is time for this cerebral driver to figure out where and why he is slower than his team-mate, and do something about it. This, of course, assumes that he has the ability to out-perform his team-mate.
    At the Hungaroring we once again saw that Hamilton drives the car, whereas Button is driven by the car.

  68. Trent says:

    Any ideas what Webber and Charlie Whiting we looking at in the cockpit in parc ferme?

  69. humblebee says:

    webber is a gentleman driver. finally he got what he deserves. respect. outstanding performance, bravo!

    vettel is just a little kid, no class, spoiled and needs anger management advice. absolutely not a professional.

    schumi is over the expiry date. he should change the sport. he is dangerous and should be invited to tea and biscuits with ecclestone bevore he leaves.

  70. Olivier says:

    … napping?!

    I thought Vettel was being a teamplayer by giving Webber a head start (to be in front of Alonso after his pitstop), NOT?!

    1. James Allen says:

      Not. He was caught napping

    2. briany says:

      have you not noticed how desperately Vettel wants to win? When he loses it eats him up and his ultimate rival for the championship is Webber. It’s seems self-evident he would NEVER aid Webber.

  71. srking says:

    Hi James,

    On the subject of pitting under the Safety Car, why not simply say that the race order is neutralised?

    In le Tour de France, a crash in the last 3km of a stage means that nobody loses time; this is done to prevent excessive risks being taken when the riders are travelling at high speeds.

    Similarly, why not say that the order of cars choosing to pit under the SC is set when the SC is deployed. This way, there is still the tactical decision of choosing whether or not to pit, without the need to take excessive risks in a busy pitlane. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this suggestion.

    Thanks for the blog,
    Steven

    1. James Allen says:

      I like the tactical opportunities of the safety car. Just need to simplify the rules

  72. Steven King says:

    There would still be the tactical decision of whether or not to pit, it’s just the order of cars entering the pitlane that would be fixed. I guess there’s then a difficulty in recombining cars exiting the pitlane with cars that chose not to pit, which complicates matters quite a lot…perhaps this idea requires a bit more thought.

    On another note, I think it would be sensible for cars lapped by the leader to drop to the back of the queue behind the SC. The old system of lapped cars overtaking didn’t really work; it either took forever for them to catch the end of the queue, or they only got a little bit ahead, and would then require re-lapping.

    I guess the Safety Cars rules are among the toughest to get “right” in F1. They’re always going to interfere with the race somehow, it’s just working out how to make them interfere in the fairest way.

    Cheers,
    Steven

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