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Pat Fry and Ferrari
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Pat Fry and Ferrari
Posted By: James Allen  |  21 Jun 2010   |  3:32 pm GMT  |  101 comments

It has been confirmed by Ferrari that Pat Fry, formerly one of the two chief designers at McLaren, is to join the team as assistant technical director.


He is latest in long line of engineers to move between Maranello and Woking. It is a well trodden path for engineers, especially for aerodynamicists. This year John Iley came to the UK, while Nicolas Tombazis has moved both ways.

Fry was in an alternating design role at McLaren with Tim Goss. This year’s car is Goss’, last year’s and the 2007 car were Fry’s. He was due therefore to be in charge of next year’s McLaren.

He left McLaren a few months ago and most observers in the paddock reckoned that he was heading for Toro Rosso to be reunited with Giorgio Ascanelli, his old mentor from Benetton days.

But it was also suggested recently that Fry was looking for a role within an F1 team which might offer him a slightly less intense life. He has been at the coal face for many years, as David Coulthard’s engineer back in the Hakkinen/Coulthard years and more recently shouldering the responsibility for design.

A move to Ferrari, especially in a position of responsibility, would likely be very intense, so it will be interesting to see how the ostensibly hands-on role evolves, particularly if he is required to attend races.

Ferrari is due to unveil it’s new technical package in Valencia this weekend. The idea is to add a lot more downforce to the car to try to compete with Red Bull and McLaren in particular. The team has got very sidetracked since the start of the season with developing a drag reducing rear wing and still hadn’t perfected it on the last iteration of the car.

We will analyse Ferrari’s new package in depth in the LG Technical Report here on the site later this week. Initial indications are that it features the in-vogue blown diffuser, pioneered by Red Bull, whereby the exhaust exits are placed low and feed a slot in the diffuser for additional rear downforce. McLaren and Mercedes are due to unveil one of those soon as well.

There is a brief, snatched bootleg video of the alleged car during a recent filming day at Fiorano on You Tube. Although testing is banned, filming days with limited running are permitted, as are straight line aero tests.

Ferrari needs some fresh ideas in the design department. It is a few years since they came up with an idea everyone else wanted to copy, like double diffusers, F Duct wings and the like.

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101 Comments
  1. Spyros says:

    Well, Ferrari currently uses those odd-looking alloys, that the rest of the paddock can’t use until 2011, since they’re homologated… not really as big a thing as the F Duct or double diffusers, though!

    1. Banjo says:

      I forgo about that, of course they do. Force India also use a similar design i believe. It’s actually an old trick, much like the blown diffuser – that other teams seem to have missed.

  2. Matt W says:

    James, can that video be real? I thought there was an in season testing ban, so how could Ferrari test the car?

    1. Banjo says:

      Some testing is allowed for ‘promotional purposes’. The fact they decided to do some filming the week they’re launching their biggest upgrade package of the season is probably a coincidence, of course!

    2. Rich M says:

      It was for a promotional video I believe which they’re allowed to do in-season. However, its a coincidence that they should need to do a promo video at the same time that they’ve made a big change to the car…

    3. Flintster says:

      You are correct there is a testing ban, however some promotional videos are allowed. The cars are fitted I believe with GP2 tyres so that the teams cannot gain much from running the car…. while I’m sure all kM’s help in some way!!!

      1. Frenchie says:

        From memory, there aren’t GP2 tyres but specific F1 tyres whose compound is too hard to be raced i.e. harder than the hardest Bridgestone tyre available on race weekends.

        In this instance, this is no more than installation laps. It will save them a bit of time in Free Practice 1 and give them the opportunity to check basic reliability.

    4. Zeus says:

      Coz they are Ferrari !

  3. Alex says:

    Might the video clip just be the Ferrari development drivers having their test run in the 08 car?

    1. Flintster says:

      Thats definately this years F10 – No question.

  4. James, could you review the in-season testing ban? Why is Ferrari allowed to test its car at Fiorano, as shown in the video? Is this not a violation of the testing rules?

    – Jeff

  5. Conor says:

    By any chance James would Pat Fry be the “Unnamed” McLaren employee that came up with the idea for the F-duct. Whitmarsh said the guy came up with the idea a couple of years ago but it took a year or two to persuade them to put it on the car.

    Or maybe they don’t want to name the employee in fear of other teams trying to poach this “outside the box” designer.

    1. senna says:

      they say it is a junior member of the team the on that thought of the
      f-duct, so fry can’t be the one, unless they are lying.

      1. Prof Bolshaviks says:

        McLaren never told lie, not never ever. ;-)

    2. iceman says:

      It can’t have been Pat Fry – if it was his idea he would have put it on his own 2009 car, not waited for Tim Goss to put it on his this year.

      1. Ben Miller says:

        I heard that the F-duct concept came about 3 years ago. With Mclaren concentrating on KERS last year I guess it was decided not to be a critical development area.

  6. malcolm.strachan says:

    Excellent use of a Media Day! ;-)

  7. kbdavies says:

    Obviously, there goes McLaren’s 2011 car design to Ferrari. There is probably nothing new in there as F-Duct banned next year,and Blown Diffuser would have reached its design zenith by the end of the year anyway. The only info i see of a benefit to Ferrari is probably KERS packaging/design (if Ferrari are developing their own unit).
    Will the responsibility for the 2011 car now fall on Tim Goss? I presume he must be busy trying to improve this years car, with Pat focusing on next years design – which would have been at an advanced stage by now.How will it now work?
    Furthermore, I thought testing was banned? That does not look like a shakedown in a straight line to me.

    1. Rich M says:

      By the time Fry gets there, the 2011 Ferrari will be designed and built. Obviously it means McLaren’s secrets go with him, but then engineers go back and forth all the time, so I’m pretty sure there arent that many secrets left anyway

  8. Ben says:

    How are Ferrari allowed to be testing the F10.5 at Fiorino? I though only straight line testing was allowed in season!
    Didnt Ferrsri come up with mounting their engine at 3.5 degrees this year meaning a huge diffuser. Seem to remeber that worked very well in Bahrain…

  9. **Paul** says:

    “It is a few years since they came up with an idea everyone else wanted to copy, like double diffusers, F Duct wings and the like.”

    I thought they’d taken a step back to avoid such things as they used to get branded as cheats for using such devices?

  10. Matt says:

    How are Ferrari allowed to be testing?

    1. Matt says:

      A ‘filing day’ – remember that next time there is an outcry from Maranello about the rules being pushed.

  11. Sigmund says:

    And testing banned? tut tut tut.

  12. Davin Sturdivant says:

    Wait, testing? I thought that no testing that allowed this season…

  13. Phil Bishop says:

    how is testing possible?
    was it a “promotional event” and they just happened to bolt on some new bits.

    If so doesn’t that go against the grain of the testing ban and do other teams do the same?

    1. Knuckles says:

      Lotus are doing it right now: http://www.worldcarfans.com/110062026917/f1-faces-at-motogp-while-lotus-and-ferrari-test

      Others have done it before. Nothing to see here.

  14. GeoffEdwards says:

    When was this, I thought all testing except straight line testing was banned, or is that just for everyone except Ferrari?

  15. Banjo says:

    Your last point speaks volumes to me. It has been a long time since Ferrari was the trend setter. It is traditionally the teams who take the inishative with design that fight for the championships. Demonstrated by Brawn last season with the double diffuser, Red Bull and McLaren this year with the Blown Diffuser and F-duct respectfully.

  16. Phil says:

    James, did anyone ever find out who it was at Mclaren that came up with the F-duct idea? Or is it still clouded in mystery. Mclaren seemed unwilling to name who it was.

    And, now I wonder if it was Fry.

  17. Mike Misgerett says:

    Do we know for sure that it’s Alonso at the wheel?
    And anyway, would this testing be legal?

  18. Monji says:

    Hi James,

    Can an engineer leave a team and join another the following day with immediate effect or is there some sorts of rules that forces them to wait a certain time? My second question is, “Track testing is banned, how come Alonso’s testing on Maranello track?”

    Thankx JA

    1. James Allen says:

      Because it was a filming day

      1. senna says:

        they have to be carefull, otherwise teams will start filming everyday.

      2. Tim says:

        …SO………:)

      3. Robert McKay says:

        There’s regulations for the filming days too is there not…

      4. arush says:

        a particular no. of days are given by the FIA to every team for filming purposes…but james aren’t the teams supposed to use different tyres?

    2. Stuart Fenton says:

      Normally they would have gardening leave in big corporates.Say someone left virgin airways to go to B.A, a clause in their contract would stop then working at any competitors from anywhere from 6 months to 2 years. Surprised that this isn’t the case in F1!

      1. Monji says:

        Thanks for the reply :-), appreciate

      2. Mouse_Nightshirt says:

        As far as I know, most F1 people have 6 months of “gardening leave”.

      3. Neil says:

        Almost.

        You can’t have a clause that says “no working for a competitor” because that’s illegal – it’s an anti-competitive practice.

        What you have is a notice period of eg 6 months. “Gardening leave” is simply the company holding you to your notice period, but telling you not to come into the office. And – because it’s notice – you get paid ;-)

        If course, any contract can be ripped up if *all* sides agree, which is why there can be mutual agreements to void notice periods.

        Neil.

        PS Lots of contracts – in lots of industries – have the “no working for a competitor” clause even though the HR department knows it won’t stand up in court. They rely on people not trying to push it.

      4. Frenchie says:

        I second Neil’s point. These clauses are standard practice for contracts. Legal departments like to have it in there despite in the unlikely event it stands in court (anticipating any legislation changes).

  19. Chris-W says:

    Re the F10 testing – sorry if I’m confused, but is this alleged to be in-season testing by Ferrari?

  20. Henry says:

    I know that this outing of the car was apparently only a filming and promotional running; but how was this legal within the current regulations banning in-season testing, is jean todt coming in useful as an ex-ferrari boss?! but seriously, how was this allowed, surely even if they are restricted in what they can do, it is helpful on some kind of tests?

    1. Neil says:

      How about not seeing conspiricy in every possible event? ;-)

      All the teams get a fixed number of promo/filming days. The cars run fixed aero and use GP2 tyres so as to minimise the “test” element. This was agreed by FOTA a while back.

      All the teams do this – how else do you think you get eg Santander adverts on the telly?

      Neil.

  21. Andrew says:

    I know there are limitations on testing, but they do they only apply to the car currently in use? Could, in theory, an F1 team do unlimited testing on a car they never intended to use, or on a car that would not be in use until next year?

  22. Vivek says:

    Hi James,

    Are ferrari allowed to test their car privately? Isn’t in-season testing banned?? Also Sir any details about Mclaren’s big upgrades??

  23. Hisham Akhtar says:

    Wait…I thought in-season testing was banned?

  24. Steve Clark says:

    I reads somewhere that the Ferrari test was a ‘filming’ day. I interpreted that as a making a commercial for a sponsor. Seems like Mr Alonso is really on it for the benefit of cameras that I cannot see other than the bootleg one. I wonder if other teams will soon be having filming days.

    1. Knuckles says:

      Other teams have been having filming days too. Tight now Lotus are running their new chassis at the Classic Team Lotus Festival. It’s just that Ferrari’s promo days are making headlines. It’s all in the FOTA agreements.

  25. zooki says:

    “Ferrari needs some fresh ideas in the design department. It is a few years since they came up with an idea everyone else wanted to copy, like double diffusers, F Duct wings and the like.”
    I agree to a point, but feel that this seige
    against Ferrari on this blog is getting tiring,
    first it was Alonso’s howler then successive
    anti-LDM and SD articles now the technical
    team is getting it. Ferrari are still a top team, they
    would have won successive WDChamps less than two
    years ago,were it not
    for a pit-stop bungle (singapore) that arguably gifted
    Hamilton his lucky title win, if anyone is
    In need of fresh ideas its British-based
    Williams, it would be refreshing to read
    a few articles that take pot shots at Williams’
    heirachy and its current station in f1

    1. Marcus says:

      Ferrari fan?
      I don’t think James takes “pot shots” at anyone, it was simply an accurate observation. Yes, Williams needs to improve as well, but this post was about an engineer moving from McLaren to Ferrari, so that is the angle. I’m sure if he was going to Williams (or any other team) JA would have discussed that appropriately too.
      Ferrari are hiring this guy for a reason…and it’s not because their cars are too fast…
      Don’t take it so personally.

      1. Lockster says:

        “Ferrari Fan?” :)

      2. Frenchie says:

        Williams fan in disguise methinks. :D

    2. Stevie P says:

      I’m not sure about “pot shots” – for example, I don’t hear other teams complaining about the new ones with the ferocity that Ferrari seem to do – but you’re entitled to your opinion Zooki and you’re right Williams are struggling and have done for a while.

    3. Stevie P says:

      Everyone seems to mention Singapore in relation to Massa missing out on the ’08 WDC, but for me, his engine failure in Hungary with 3 laps to go, when comfortably in the lead was equally as important.

    4. Jean-Christophe says:

      Yes. And on the other hand, with max gone now and the way stewars take decisions now, he would not have been stripped of a well diserved victory in spa.
      Lucky title win? Since then I haven’t seen much of Massa’s Brilliance. McLaren went too conservative in Brazil but still figured they would pass glock anyway. He still had to keep his composure when Vettel passed him and there is no luck with that!

  26. F1 Kitteh says:

    The bar code was a nice idea, too bad they had to take that off lol.

  27. Bill Day says:

    “Ferrari needs some fresh ideas in the design department. It is a few years since they came up with an idea everyone else wanted to copy, like double diffusers, F Duct wings and the like.”

    But cutting-edge design didn’t really typify the Schumacher years, did it? I’ve always read that in those days their cars typically had no glaring weaknesses, but also didn’t take great risks, design wise.

    (Also unlimited testing and budgets, team orders + lapdog #2 drivers, and creative cheating…..)

  28. Becken says:

    Hi, James – I have a post in my blog showing the changes in the F10b´s exhaust in pictures:

    http://bit.ly/aguyYj

    I hope it is usefull…

      1. Tim says:

        The profile of he turning vain is different also….the white one directly below the mirror.

    1. BA says:

      the link is not working :(

  29. AmandaG says:

    22) TRACK AND WIND TUNNEL TESTING
    22.1 a) Track testing shall be considered any track running time undertaken by a competitor entered in the Championship with the exception of:
    i) promotional or demonstration events carried out using tyres provided specifically for this purpose by the appointed supplier;

    That is the rule in question and it doesn’t state anywhere that they cant bolt on the new parts at any point. Totally legit as Alonso was doing other promotional stuff that day. Remember Ferrari dont make advets for roadcars, F1 is their advert. So combining a day of promotion for the roadcars and giving a run in an F1 car is pretty much an advert for Ferrari, especially as it is due to appear on their website.

    I must say, I was very surprised when I heard about Pat Fry. How much truth is in it, only time will tell However, from what I’ve read, Ferrari refused to comment. To me a refusal to comment suggests more truth than rumour. If there were nothing to it then Ferrari could have easily said it wasn’t true.

  30. Taimur says:

    People each team has a limited number of filming days available for the shooting of promotional videos. I’m not sure if there’s any restriction on the specification of the car the team can run, but they have to use special demonstration run bridgestone tyres. The fact that the team can just get useful mileage on new components is pretty important and Ferrari is taking advantage of this since they have struggled with reliability. As a Ferrari fan and for Ferrari’s sake as well, I hope the updates do push Ferrari to the front because we desperately need it!

  31. sixtenths says:

    James,

    People seem convinced Teams can just bolt on a Blown Diffuser a la Red Bull, but, given the tight packaging, compromises and complexity of Aero solutions, e.g. the F Duct that nobody else can simply copy, can they add this idea relatively simply, or will it mess up other areas and prove as tricky as the F Duct to copy ?

    What has happened to the mysterious Q3 speed RBR were pulling out and the accusations of ride height adjustments ? Teams were planing on copying systems they thought could replicate it, but got warned off, now it seems less talked about ?

    1. James Allen says:

      McLaren caught them up. There are some very clever things on the Red Bull, but McLaren has really taken the fight to them and we will see what Ferrari has up its sleeve this weekend.

  32. Bru72 says:

    Ferrari are the best, go Ferrari!

  33. Vivek Krishna A says:

    Sorry James, but this blog seems of late to be on a Ferrari witch hunt. There has been successive articles targeting Ferrari and its management.

    I am particularly disappointed with the the comments that have been made over the past week on various articles related to Ferrari.

    I honestly hope you would come with something better rather than turning this nice site into another “Ferrari-Bashing” paradise.

    1. James Allen says:

      Sorry but this is out of order. This is not a “Ferrari bashing site”. Read back over the last year and a half and you will find balance. If people choose to make comments positive or negative about a team then as long as they observe the decorum ruies they are shown. The editorial line is not Ferrari bashing by any means.

      1. MikeR says:

        Editorial balance is exactly that and requires the bad to be analysed and reported along with the good.
        This site (including its many knowledgeable contributors) is one of the best at this and it is equally valid (and expected by its audience) for it to analyse why a team appears to be under-performing as it is to understand where another has an advantage.
        Keep up the great work.

      2. Stefanos says:

        I agree that it is not James’ responsibility for the comments being posted here. It is, however, rather surpsising how many people are so eager and primed to post anti-Ferrari comments and pursue consiracy theory witch hunts on every given opportunity. Allegedly, 60% of F1 fans support Ferrari. It seems most of them are not readers of this blog? :)

    2. Frenchie says:

      You must be fairly new to this site. We all know James is Webber biased. :-)

      James is the kind of guys that has earnt significant respect from the F1 community at large, from being first as a succesful TV commentator (ever heard Legard?) then a relevant blogger.

      Unlike most F1 blogs, his covers topics not necessarily relayed by Autosport.com and has a worldwide following. He is certainly highly rated amongst us in Oz (and the half dozen petrolheads in the office).

      His blog post go into lots of details, and his points are justified.

      Finally, just look at the panel of F1 people he’s been able to put together for the 1st July: it includes a Ferrari team member (alongside McLaren, Lotus, MercedesGP and Force India). If this is not the proof of fair F1 news coverage, I don’t know what is.

      If you dig a little bit on past entries, you’ll see most JAonF1 readers also like his balanced views, which is why most of us stick around. ITV-F1 forum was too much of a Hamilton vs. Alonso fest.

  34. Jon says:

    Ferrari doesn’t necessarily need innovative parts like F duct, or double diffuser, which aren’t even innovative. They are just calculated risks hoping that the FIA will allow them to use them. Sort of like grabbing a football players jersey in the box, and hoping not to get caught. If you are caught, you look the fool, if you aren’t caught it’s genius. There is alot of politics behind what FIA allows, and what they don’t as well. But maybe that is changing under Todt’s reign. There is a fine line, between innovation and sidestepping the rules, under a technicality.

    What Ferrari needs is a better core concept. A better grasp on the rules as a whole, so that their solution to everything isn’t to copy everyone else. That’s what teams behind the eight ball have to do. Ferrari have been doing this the last 18 months. This years car is already a Redbull clone, and now they are adding the exhaust system. But it is never as good to copy, as it is to invent as you will understand the thoughts and philosphy behind it alot better.

    Redbull’s pull rod suspension isn’t innovative either. It’s been used before in F1. Very few ideas are new, it’s just whether or not they will work in current regs, combined with will they be allowed to use them by FIA. It’s a risk, because no team wants to put their resources into developing something, only for it to be banned after a few races. So there is always an element of gamble. It is important for the sports credibility for the FIA to be seen as impartial in these situations.

    However.. the better the core concept, the less you have to gamble. We can now look back and say that Brawn’s car last year was a one trick pony. Without the double diffusers, it was only a good car, and since others added their’s they have continously slipped backwards.

    There was also alot of talk about finishing work on this years car to concentrate on next years car. Alot of the teams that do, it doesn’t even seem to help them. A good core concept is better then a few extra months in development.

    1. Liam says:

      Yup, I agree with all of this… nice post.

    2. iceman says:

      Your football shirt-pulling analogy doesn’t hold up. The fact is McLaren _did_ get “caught” using their F-duct. By the first race everyone had a pretty clear idea of what it was. But that didn’t matter because, unlike shirt-pulling, it wasn’t against the rules.
      A better analogy would be the first football player who realised that the rules allowed you to head the ball into the goal instead of kicking it.

      I also disagree with the idea that the Brawn was a “one-trick pony”. Williams and Toyota had the same trick and they had nowhere near the speed of the Brawn. Every part of that car was super-refined at the start of the season because (reputedly) it was the most expensive F1 car in history.

  35. Steven says:

    They can run the car at “promotional events”. Maybe Ferrari should alow the new teams free use of its track so they can get faster and not impede their drivers. haha

    As usual Ferrari needs to break the rules in order to get better. Yet, McLaren doesnt need any ilegal testing to improve.

  36. Bill Nuttall says:

    I don’t mean this in a bitchy way, but didn’t Pat Fry design the worst McLaren in twenty years? Seems a little strange that Ferrari would want to hire a guy with the 2009 car on his CV.

    1. BeenDun says:

      He designed the 2007 car, which Alonso and Hamilton put to good use. Almost took the WDC. The reality is while McLaren have always been at the sharp end of the blade they have only managed to actually win a championship once in the 00′s. So, stealing Mclaren design talent may not be the panacea that Ferrari seeks.

    2. Ben says:

      He also designed the 2007 McLaren which was probably the best car of the field that year. I know that a lot of people will say that was designed with the help of a Ferrari dossier but if that was the case it shows that Pat Fry is adept at making Ferrari designs work well.

    3. iceman says:

      Good point… jumped or pushed? ;)

  37. Flintster says:

    I thought it was common knowledge that promotional videos are allowed….!!! This is not Ferrari bending the rules as some suggest, this is open to them all. The F1 cars have to fit GP2 tyres – so they can not gain anything from a ‘filming day’ that maybe seen as a small test. I’m sure it helps Ferrari to know thought that all the new bits are bolted on correctly….

    1. Just A Bloke (Martin) says:

      I am sure that even with GP2 tyres you can get comparative data when trying different parts. you could certainly do reliability running.

      Rather than bitch about it why not let the teams stay on after a GP on the Monday to test. The big cost of shipping the team and kit is covered, work with the circuit organisers and you might even be able to get some revenue by letting spectators in to cover costs for marshalls, and the like. Obviously would not work with back to back races or street courses but I bet you could eight or ten days of testing done for a reasonable cost. Killing two birds with one stone you could always specify that half the mileage was done by rookie drivers giving them some mileage as well,.. :)

  38. Top says:

    what’s your problem, cant you read? It’s crystal clear, “filming days with limited running are permitted”. Oh and by the way, it is not a Ferrari thing, other teams do it and also did it last year.

  39. Harvey Yates says:

    Does this mean that Pat will leave McLaren with immediate effect because of the agreed cooling off period?

    Such moves are normally caused by being pushed as well as pulled. Last year’s car was a bit of a dog, at least in the early stages, but McLaren started 2010 in the best of the rest group and has since moved up to challenging for first, something it didn’t really manage in 2009.

    And the next question is: whose designer will Whitmarsh pinch? I wonder if a few CVs are making their way to his desk as I type. Might submit mine.

    This will hurt McL but it is something they could, with a bit of intelligent recruiting or in-house promotion, gain from in the medium term.

    And a good point from Zooki, although not the bit about pot-shots. What’s happened to Williams this season? The Cosworth is powerful and loses nothing in comparison with the established engine manufacturers. So why is such a great team struggling? Sad, so sad, to see.

    Frank and Patrick are, with Ron Dennis wandering off and seemingly confused, the real old stagers of F1.

    1. Tim says:

      Williams …is not doing good because the constant bitching (by the two/three) at the top have finally caught up with them….can you imagine how demoralizing it would be to work with them.

      Some point you have got to find a bit of good in your job/career-chosen profession….FW has always said poor ..poor me always behind in resources…he is not that far back in resources. Not ML or Ferrari…but not even mid pack for that.

      1. Harvey Yates says:

        I can see your point and I would suggest there are few who believe that the Williams camp is an unending source of positive comment. There are fewer still who would fly with an airline that followed their man management ethos.

        However, it was always thus and so you would have to explain why they, together with McLaren, dominated the sport for ten seasons.

        If anything, Patrick Head seems as relaxed as I’ve ever seen him, sometimes even smiling. Perhaps that’s why their performance has dropped off: he’s stopped biting people.

        Williams were/are one of the all time greats. Pat and Frank are the longest serving team managers by far. They’ve done a lot for F1, although it sometimes seemed as if it was by accident. The Williams Judd was a great car. Mansell showed that bhp wasn’t everything.

        I’ve some great memories of the Williams cars. They’ve had some of the best drivers, albeit then fired them. Alan Jones was a giant in the days of ground effect. And the ’87 British GP showed that you only need two cars to make a great race.

      2. iceman says:

        “If anything, Patrick Head seems as relaxed as I’ve ever seen him, sometimes even smiling. Perhaps that’s why their performance has dropped off: he’s stopped biting people.”

        That’s an interesting observation, I think you might have something there. Perhaps they’ve got a bit too mellow.

        McLaren also seem to have become a more mellow outfit in the last couple of years so I wonder if they’ll suffer the same fate!

  40. Marybeth says:

    Pat Fry. That doesn’t sound Latin to me. Ferrari just fired all non-Latins & said that they didn’t want any more…?

  41. Bash says:

    DDD and Pull rod suspension is not innovative, unless you call regulation interpretation innovation – but these concepts are not new.

    F-duct is very clever, and innovative, particularly because its a combination of “moveable” aero within the regulations.

    Ferrari’s wheel design is very clever.

    The “nose bumps” adopted from last years Red Bull (by everybody) are smart, and show engineering leadership.

    Ferrari need to up their game – but adopting the best ideas of others is nothing new, especially when the baseline car is as good as the ferrari… lets see if all they have changed is the rear end; I have a feeling it is going to be a front-to-rear improvement.

  42. Nando says:

    He didn’t do a very good job with the 2009 car, and the 2007 car supposedly used ferrari data.

  43. Guilherme says:

    Hello James. Regarding this new diffuser, maybe this has alread been discussed here on the forum, but didn’t the Mclaren MP4-18 tried the very same concept? What happened to this car and why did it failed? The info on the internet is very scarce.

  44. Taimur says:

    Its been confirmed. Pat Fry is Ferrari’s new assistant technical director. Here’s the link,

    http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/84669

  45. Damian Johnson says:

    Hi James, Has any senior Ferrari designer ever moved to another team and specifically McLaren or is this usually a one way traffic to Ferrari? I ask because this is the easiest way to poach winning design ideas successfully without incurring a spygate scandal.

    1. James Allen says:

      Tombazis went from Ferrari to McLaren and then back again

  46. AlexD says:

    I think Ferrari is not breaking any regulations with this test. This is what I have read on ESPN:

    “Although there is currently an in-season testing ban in Formula One, all teams are allowed to complete limited promotional running during which cars are videoed and photographed for sponsors.”

    They predict that Ferrari will gain 0.7 sec per lap…let’s see. If this is going to be true and consistent, we might have an even better championship, because Alonso will be fighting with Red Bulls and McLarens.

  47. charles fox says:

    Pretty sure on the filming day thing, they’re allowed like 3 or 4 a year. but have to use Bridgestone demonstration tyres (the rock hard crappy ones). I’m fairly sure though that theres some limit on cornering speeds over cert in radius ranges of corners, limited to like 60 or 100mkh average speed or something. They used one of those at Fiarano or Mugello last year with Badoer and i’m sure the speed limit was a little serious an issue to stop it being a major issue.

    however this could be some cop out using GP2 or other tyres instead to avoid the normal rules as such, or using an F60 with components to say its not a current car or something.

  48. David Jerromes says:

    It seems to me that many replies to your story are from people who don’t read it in the first place…., the amount of those querying ‘why’ Ferrari is able to test in-season is answered in your article…

    Great piece, most interesting.

    No silly questions from me, just solid appreciation!

  49. Tombstone says:

    Here’s hoping McLaren have a ‘promotional day’ scheduled to take place shortly before Silverstone.

  50. bhav says:

    i think pat fry need to leave ferrari ever since he came felip massa always losing and getting worse the whole team is a shamble no great progress has been made since pat fry arrive bring the old guy back.it like having mclaren reject at ferrari.

  51. bhav says:

    ferrari is the best we need to stay at pole position from the word go

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