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Ferrari lays into Mosley and the new teams adventure
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Ferrari lays into Mosley and the new teams adventure
Posted By: James Allen  |  23 Feb 2010   |  6:35 pm GMT  |  151 comments

Ferrari has launched an astonishing attack on Max Mosley, the FIA under his management and the whole new teams adventure, which has changed F1 pretty substantially in the last 12 months.

Picture 5
Last season we got increasingly used to feisty posts on the Ferrari site, which posted a record 300 million page impressions in 2009. Before Monaco there was a stinging put down of the aspirant new teams, implying that if they came in the series would be no better than GP3. Now they have gone a stage further.

The cars and freight will be sent for the first race in Bahrain next week and yet we do not know how many teams will be in the pit lane. Surveying the messy scene around the new teams as the first race looms on the horizon, with USF1 asking to miss races and Campos in disarray, Ferrari has used the mouthpiece of a column on the site called “Horse Whisperer” to share some opinions.

“This is the legacy of the holy war waged by the former FIA president. The cause in question was to allow smaller teams to get into Formula 1.

“This is the outcome: two teams will limp into the start of the championship, a third is being pushed into the ring by an invisible hand – you can be sure it is not the hand of Adam Smith – and, as for the fourth, well, you would do better to call on Missing Persons to locate it.”

The two “limping” teams are presumably Lotus and Virgin, who tested last week at Jerez with mixed results. Virgin clearly has a serious hydraulic problem, while Lotus managed to do quite a few laps, but both teams are likely to be two or three seconds off the back of the established teams. To call them “limping” seems quite harsh.

“In the meantime, we have lost two constructors along the way, in the shape of BMW and Toyota, while at Renault, there’s not much left other than the name. Was it all worth it?”

It is political and quite provocative in its message and its timing. Speaking to the team this afternoon, it is something they felt needed to be said now.

Judging from the response in the last week to the plight of USF1 ( 82% of JA on F1 readers – in a sample poll of over 5,000 – saying that USF1 should not be allowed to miss the first four races) the fans are not too happy about the way the situation has unfolded. The feeling I get is that the viewing public does not appear to share with Ferrari a great feeling of loss for the manufacturers in question, but it does agree with Ferrari that the lowering of standards is not in the best interests of F1.

“Of the thirteen teams who signed up, or were induced to sign up, for this year’s Championship, to date only eleven of them have heeded the call, turning up on track, some later than others, and while some have managed just a few hundred kilometres, others have done more, but at a much reduced pace, ” the column says. Note the use of the word “induced”, which refers partly to the way that five of the teams, including Ferrari, were signed up to the championship last June despite saying that they did not wish to.

“As for the twelfth team, Campos Meta, its shareholder and management structure has been transformed, according to rumours which have reached the Horse Whisperer through the paddock telegraph, with a sudden cash injection from a munificent white knight, well used to this sort of last minute rescue deal.

“The thirteenth team, US F1, appears to have gone into hiding in Charlotte, North Carolina, to the dismay of those like the Argentinian, Lopez, who thought he had found his way into the Formula 1 paddock, (albeit with help from chairwoman Kirchner, according to the rumours) and now has to start all over again.

“Amazingly, they still have the impudence to claim that everything is hunky-dory under the starry stripy sky.

“Next, we have the Serbian vultures,” it added, referring to the Stefan GP effort. “Firstly, they launched themselves into a quixotic legal battle with the FIA, then they picked the bones of Toyota on its death bed.

“Having got some people on board, around whom there was still a whiff of past scandals, they are now hovering around waiting to replace whoever is first to drop out of the game, possibly with backing from that very same knight in shining armour whom we mentioned earlier.”

Ferrari, like McLaren, cannot bear to see the grinning face of Mike Coughlan on the Stefan GP website. Coughlan was the man at the heart of the Spy Scandal two years ago and for Stefan to hire and parade him is surely unacceptable to both teams.

Today’s message takes team communications to an altogether different level. This is satire, political invective and stirring all rolled into one, it’s Private Eye meets F1 and it’s coming from the best known team in the sport.

I’m due to meet up with Mosley tomorrow in London, along with a small number of colleagues, so it will be very interesting to hear his response.

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151 Comments
  1. tom says:

    well i can’t help but think they were a little harsh on the new guys but stuff it, it’s about time teams expressed their genuine emotions about the whole thing.
    towards the end there Mosley had totally lost the plot and turned what should be professional business in to a personal vendetta, and i do think the sport has been permanantly damaged as a result.
    i hope Todt can streer them in the right direction, but the teams are going to have to take responsibility for their own futures.
    i think Toyota and BMW would be absent from the grid this year regardless.

    as for new teams missing races, well i don’t see the point in having them race unless they have proven that they are capable, it ‘s F1 for crying out loud, not a sunday cup.
    maybe it’s a bit harsh but i don’t think it’s too much to ask for teams to prove themselves in GP2 (or equivalent) before joining F1. i know a lot of the staff themselves are experienced but if the management can’t hack it in F1 why don’t they start lower down and work their way up?
    it’s greed like we’ve seen in football recently with rich folk just buying a team without really thinking about it. shades of Portsmouth FC some of these new teams.

    1. F1 Kitteh says:

      Exactly, if I recall correctly Toyota and BMW left AFTER Mosley agreed to step down, and FOTA decided NOT to go ahead with the breakaway. Were they so confident in their plans for the new series, they could have pressed ahead. As it stands, the evidence seem to suggest that they left because of performance of their core business, as Mosley have suggested, way ahead of time. Maybe Honda could make the argument that they were fed up by the politics and left, but certainly Toyota/BMW/Reanult..etc could not use that as an excuse. Can’t wait for the day when Lotus beats them up in a straight fight on the track.

      1. Zobra Wambleska says:

        You may be right about T/BMW/R leaving the sport anyway, but I seem to remember them being very involved in the breakaway effort of FOTA. That effort really came to an end when it became clear that Bernie and Max had done an end run on them by allowing for a larger field of cars for 2010 and then holding FOTAs feet to the fire, forcing them to sign the concord agreement on a do or die time play. These new teams were signed with very little due diligence in order to force this game into a sudden death overtime. Max may have won the battle, but I’m afraid he’s lost the war. It will take the FIA and F1 a long time to recover from this mess.

      2. F1 Kitteh says:

        I guess I’m a bit more optimistic. The manufacturers might have disappeared, but all that meant is the sticker on the side of the car is gone. The talent that worked for them will land elsewhere and use their experiences to bring the new boys up to speed. Red Bull used to be Stewart and Brawn was BAR remember?

      3. Antoine says:

        I’m sure that will Never happen,…

      4. F1 Kitteh says:

        Are you sure Luca ?

    2. Not yet World Champion says:

      It’s the usual melodramatic strutting from Ferrari but Mosley has brought much of this onto himself by his egocentric and tyrannical behaviour whilst at the FIA.He has quite a few enemies and many will take great delight at any discomfort which comes his way.

  2. Mr Spindles says:

    Shocked and appalled!! Don’t they normally “leak” their comments to certain journalists?

  3. Mike from Medellin, Colombia says:

    James, I love some of the language used in this article.

    Very funny.

    Some of it probably does not translate well from Italian, but there are some very witty quips that must come directly from the flamboyant LDM. Serbian Vultures, Hand of Adam Smith, Horse Whisperer!!

    It’s quite refreshing that they don’t follow the normal bland corporate line of the others. I remember their put down of Williams last summer very well.

    I think that Max Mosley is fantastic entertainment and like him of loathe him, there is no doubting that he has one of the sharpest brains in F1.

    I can’t wait to read your meeting notes tomorrow!

    1. Murray says:

      Perhaps the Horse Whisperer doesn’t realise that he’s slurring Ferrari, who won the 1956 championship with cars that they got, vulture-like, after Lancia’s bankruptcy? I wonder what they were calling Ross Brawn last year in private.

  4. Al (21prods) says:

    James, for your own safety, don’t forget to take a helmet and a pack of valiums for your meeting with Mosley, I simply cannot imagine him saying anything in a quiet way after Ferrari’s comments (rage is what I can imagine).

    Mosley’s outing from the presidency of FIA was for me the best news of year 2009 in motorsport. Even if they are a bit too harsh, Ferrari makes a point which neither Mosley nor the FIA can overturn, these new teams are not healthy enough for a discipline which tries to be seen as the pinnacle of motorsport.

    And yes, I can also imagine Ecclestone behind Campos and StefanGP, the question is what for. Getting access to FOTA in order to apply the divide and win policy? Who knows?

    Regards,

  5. Greig says:

    The “limping” comments aimed at Lotus and Virgin are extremely disrespectful. Testing hasn’t gone brilliantly but they do seem to be well organised. Given time I think they’ll come good.

    Different story regarding Campos and USF1 though. With what we’ve heard, they are (or were) anything but organised. I can see Ferrari’s point with these two. Were they chosen because they would have been more mallable than the likes of Lola and Prodrive?

  6. Steve W says:

    When Ferrari first mocked the quality of the new teams last year, I thought they were being unfair. However the way things have unfolded over the last couple of months, I am now starting to see their point. Whilst it is great to see new teams coming in, to see some already looking to skip races does not do the sports reputation any good. The return of drivers with big sponsorship getting seats ahead of those with more talent and experience is a pity too.

    Max Mosley may have been right to encourage new teams to enter the sport to protect it from manufacturer teams pulling out, but you have to wonder whether he got the selection criteria right. Surely there were other teams, like Prodrive, that would have been better placed to succeed in F1?

  7. JF says:

    I for one like the idea of privateers entering the sport, teams have to start somewhere, as even Ferrari and Mclaren did decades ago. Would have preferred a more open tech formula to see if the new blood could bring some outside/fresh innovation. I do agree with the sentiment if not degree of the Ferrari blog however. Teams should have been more properly examined, particularly USF1 which I suspect (like others) was a marketing ploy to gain US exposure. Can’t fathom why Prodrive which has some real credibility wasn’t accepted.

  8. Marc says:

    I agreed with Ferrari’s stance about this topic around the time of the applications last summer and I still agree with it now. In fact, my opinion has been strengthened by recent events, reports and rumours.

    From the outside, it has always looked as if the FIA was mismanaging the process: it was initiated far too late, as evidenced by the delays and constraints that the new entrants have suffered; it appeared to lack sufficient due diligence, as evidenced by the financial problems of two of the entrants; and allowing four new teams smacks of quantity over quality.

    Even with the loss of one factory team and the change of ownership of another, I would much prefer to see a few high quality teams than a bulging pitlane of mixed quality, including one team in particular that wants to have a go at racing on a convenient part-time basis. This belief that F1 needs to have its numbers bolstered in any way possible is just wrong.

    Most of the recent problems involving the new entrants could have been predicted and, arguably, mitigated by better management and decisions from the FIA.

  9. CharlieH says:

    Fascinating stuff, it really does make me wonder what will be left of F1 at the end of this season? It’s going to be a dramatic year at the very least!

  10. Morris Mao says:

    Please send my regards to him, Mr.Mosley.

    We would never be surprised to see different voices.

    I do not think Mosley should be critised when BMW, Toyota, Honda left.

    But how FIA could take care of them? it is really an interesting topic.

  11. Jodum5 says:

    I respect Ferrari’s point of view. But I’m astonished at the level of unprofessionalism in their post. It sounds like an unfunny 15 year old wrote it. They could’ve done a much better, wittier job getting their point across.

    1. Peter Brito says:

      they’re Italian; thats how they speak – not an insult at all… This was obviously translated directly from Italian to English…

      1. Jodum5 says:

        That’s the best excuse for them? They’re a global company, with a global staff. They did an atrocious job with that post. They come incredibly petty and inarticulate. I’m embarrassed for them.

  12. stuart says:

    I can only agree Mosley lost the plot… I mean how come David Richards’ failed to get one of the new team slots given his track record in F1. as well as lining up the funding for buying Aston Martin. Or maybe that was the reason? I’m pretty sure he wouldn’t be in the same situation as Campos or USF1 right now.

  13. Khan says:

    Harsh but facts. I think it undermines the marques like ferrari competing against new teams who drop the parts on track without any contact. F1 need manufacturers with a few indipendant teams, it would have been great if we had bmw, toyota and honda lining up on grid and others like vw, aston martin and others persuaded to join in. Fia should have worked this way.

  14. Matthew Sheader says:

    Is it just me or does this seem a little caustic from Ferrari??

    I certainly aggree that the new teams should not be able to have a pick and choose mentality to the season. In my mind you either turn up on day one or miss the year. F1 is the pinnacle of motorsport and it would de-value F! to alow teams to miss races. If USF1 don’t like it they can start a GP2 team.

    Ferrari also have a dig at Lotus and Virgin for being off the pace. I really don’t like that attitude and I think it should be shunned in F1.

  15. Stephen Rose says:

    If Ferrari was one of your extended family members they’d be the rich uncle who pops up at family functions half cut, convinces your gran to sign over the entire family estate to him because he’s ‘special’, bullies the younger siblings while harking on about ‘the good old days’, whilst incoherently ranting about how amazing they are and how awful everything and everyone else is.

    1. Uncle Stephen, is that you? How are you? Gran’s doing ok in the home

    2. Murray says:

      Yeah, we’ve got a senior politician like that in opposition here in Australia. Even one of his party colleagues described him as the “mad uncle”.

      1. rpaco says:

        You are luck mate, we have one running the country, :-) well what’s left of it after selling most of it down the river into EEC slavery and allowing most of the rest to be bought out by foreign corporations.

    3. " for sure " says:

      Brilliant. Spot on. I have always loathed Ferrari for exactly the characteristics that they are exhibiting now. They believe they own F1. None of these teams set out to fail. Huge sums have been expended in their efforts to make the grid, and all Ferrari can do is crow and ridicule. I pray their 2010 season is a disaster.

    4. Henry says:

      I do entirely agree that Ferrari have excessive strut and swagger in their behavior, also a heavy dose of inconsistency and double standards. However I do agree that the FIA has completely mismanaged the whole entry of new teams, of course they would be a second or two slower than the established ones, but I think we all expected them to show up to Bahrain with four wheels and a driver on the grid!

      But their personal vendetta against Moseley is irritating. It is unprofessional behavior which is unsightly, unnecessary and can’t do any good. those who love Ferrari will continue to do so, but hose who don’t have a perfect example of why their behavior is sometimes despicable.

  16. Guy says:

    It seems we see ever more unpleasant manners from Ferrari. So much of what is reported here is just plain unpleasant – regardless of the facts. Yes it’s entertaining reading – but I can’t help but feel they are sinking to lower levels themselves with this sort of behavior. Not a pretty sight, or to be proud of. Nice looking new car – but the rhetoric leaves something to be desired.
    Maybe just happy to be top of the pile, but ungracious when things have not gone their own way.
    Yes it’s not good to think that some “teams” have failed to get their act together – but it had all become too much of a closed club so a few eggs have to break on the way to add some new blood to the sport which has become to dependent upon manufacturers – who ultimately have to be more commercially interested in promotion than they are in the sport it seems.
    While Lotus and Virgin are looking a little shaky to start who can deny that they look like they might end up being credible teams and – hey the cars look pretty don’t they?
    Ferrari being one of the few real racing teams lets the side down with this kind of behavior I think. Time they got over the calling out Mosley gave them and behaved with more dignity.

  17. Heffalump says:

    So there’s still someone around listening to what ol’ Max has got to say? Oh, that’s weird.

  18. mike from medellin says:

    mosley remindes me to george w bush.

    1. Alex says:

      How so? They are at completely opposite sides of the IQ latter.

    2. Alex says:

      Good comparison.

  19. Dom says:

    only one thing to say about all this….

    LOL

  20. jw1980 says:

    James,

    what is the bigger picture here? What are Ferrari trying to achieve? In my opnion there is no doubt that BMW and Toyota were going to pullout this year regardless of what happened. It’s a good job we have, in Lotus and Virgin, credible new entrants. Every team needs to start somewhere. How many points did Toyota score in their first season? Just two. There’s a strong possibility that both Lotus and Virgin will surpass that this season even if the previous points scoring system is used.
    Cast your minds back to the early 90s. Ferrari failed to win a single race in 91,92 and 93. Even they have had their lean spells. A quick glance at the 92 season reveals that on average they were 2-3 seconds per lap behind the pacesetters Williams. They have not always been dominant.
    Are Ferrari still smarting because they have lost Schumacher because third cars could not have been introduced? Is this what they are angling at? We don’t want DTM in F1 when two manaufacturers compete against each other with limited variety and team orders.

    1. Laurence H says:

      That’s a great point about the early 90s. If you don’t have humility and remember your own past failings, then arrogance is the natural result. Then you wonder why people don’t like you and want to see you fail. I hope the front wing falls off a Ferrari this week.

    2. Martin Smith says:

      Absolutely right!

  21. James Punt says:

    For once I am in total agreement with Ferrari. It was pretty clear that Mosleys FIA wanted the manufactures out and smaller, weaker, more malleable teams to take their place. The selection process for new teams stank to high heaven.

    I have no doubt that Mosley will spin the story along the lines of ‘I knew that the manufacturer teams would leave the sport once things got tough. Thankfully we now have a full grid which was all down to my vision.’

    Sadly what we have got is perhaps four new teams, but probably less, none of which will bring anything to the show and simply spread sponsor income a little thinner.

    Maybe Lotus will develop into a serious midfield team in time, but my money is on the other three not being around for very long. A complete shambles and it makes F1 look weak. Well done Max, another stunning triumph.

    1. Jonny Kiehlmann says:

      To be fair, it was clear that manufacturer teams would leave the sport once things got tough – this has been made clear.

      The big point that is glossed over here is that USF1 and Campos signed up when there was a probability of a capped budget. As Ferrari and BMW, that manufacturer, like Renault and Toyota, who signed a document committing to the next three or five years in F1 at the time, forced the budget cap to go, it’s not really entirely the fault of the new teams that they can no longer compete.

      Campos’ difficultieis have largely been because Ferrari was blocking their sale for a while. I can’t help seeing this as huge hypocrsiy.

  22. Azos says:

    Well, you cant argue with them.

    F1 is the supposed pinnacle of motor sport, the very top of what technical talent, driver ability and a bucket load of money can achieve, founded on a history of excellence.

    Instead, technical advances are stopped, historic tracks relegated to little more than just another race neutered and altered away from what made them great, and caps imposed such that its not what a team could reach, but rather what they are allowed to reach held back by ties that allow a bunch of mediocre cowboys to claim a place in the racing elite.

    Formula One is a highly expensive, hard sport, which brings with it spectacle and glamour that other sports cannot compete with. Rather than efforts to support those teams who are unlikely to make it to the first grid, let alone make it to the finish is plain stupidity, rather than supporting, encouraging and persuading the large manufactures to stay in the sport.

    Fortunately, this year see’s a drivers line up unmatched in resent seasons, lets just hope the new teams don’t spoil the party by leaking oil all over the track and crashing to often.

    This could be a golden age for Formula One, but instead I fear I may be forced to watch it fade to nothing more than a shadow of the promise it could have been.

    1. Brace says:

      You make very good points here.

  23. AlexD says:

    First and foremost I am interested whether Todt was informed that Ferrari is going to issue a statement like this. I could play to his benefit too – people will not miss a point. What Ferrari said was not a critique of FIA per se, but it is a strong statement against Mosley.

    I will not comment on Virgin and Lotus. The made it and I can only hope that they will do better as the season develops.

    But they are 100% right when it comes to lowering the level of the sport – F1 is going the right direction…or was not going the right direction.

    US1 had a lot of time to make their project successful, but apparently wrong people are leading it….and talking about Stefan….well. Would you hire a thief and a liar and a traitor? How can you look into the eyes of Ferrari and McLaren guys after a move like this?

  24. xnexus says:

    Harsh, but true. Even if getting the new teams in was desirable, the selection critera was a complete joke. Prodrive and Lola left on the sidelines in favour of Campos and USF1?

    1. mike from medellin ,el chivato says:

      i agree with you. But f1 has always been like that. Some teams make it some don’t. So two out of four, is not far from what happened in the 80′s.

  25. Alex says:

    What does Ferrari hope to accomplish by taking a stab at almost everyone? They are entitled to an opinion and they may have a point or two about Max, USF1 and Campos.

    But to try and discredit Lotus and Virgin, two new teams who have really done a great job at preparing for the upcoming season with limited time and resources is nothing short of unprofessional, childish and arrogant.

    I can’t help but see a resemblance with the time J. Villeneuve was mouthing off about how J.Button would need to prove himself before he gets any respect. Over the course of the season JV looked like the rookie while JB consistently outperformed him. I bet JV still regrets his words.

    Of course, it would take a miracle for either Lotus or Virgin to beat Ferrari in any one race this year, but they at least deserve some respect for making it to Bahrain. A gap of 2, even 3sec./lap to the leaders is highly respectable from a team in its first year.

    Shame on Ferrari for picking on the little guys.

    1. mike from medellin ,el chivato says:

      3 sec a lap, it could be more.

  26. Flintelli says:

    Ahh fair play Ferrari. Got to hand it to them they are right!

    Does make me chuckle how the Ferrari brand/website has changed over the last few years….. under Todt they would not have been so politically obvious!!!

    Nice work Scuderia….

    1. todt was so boring says:

      i hope it’s a change in style for thr hole f1, because this politically correct bs, is hurting the sport even more than the lack of overtaking.

    2. Zobra Wambleska says:

      Perhaps not so obvious, but just as political.

  27. Sven says:

    Well, this looks like being a message for Bernie Ecclestone and FOM mainly.
    The Concorde agreement is up for renewal in 2013 and this is probably only the first of many coming expressions of dissatisfaction by Ferrari and how much they need to persuaded to stay in F1 after 2012. But Bernie is used to dig deep in his pockets to win Ferrari over on his side so I guess the pain will not be unbearable.

    1. Meeklo says:

      Or perhaps Ferrari isn’t getting any money out of the 2009 concord and is why their being mouthy.

  28. I don’t know if it’s just a culture thing, or a translation thing, however the Ferrari post seems overly emotive and juvenile, and it really dilutes the message that they are trying to get across. One wonders if it is real, or if someone has hacked their site. I don’t expect the the oldest team in Formula 1 to publicly release something when it seems like it has been written by an angry 12 year old. They make some fair points, but how are you mean to take them seriously with sentences like this, “Next, we have the Serbian vultures”, which is a completely inflammatory statement.

    1. todt show us you are better than mosley says:

      don’t forget, the childish behavior was started with mosley, with the nazi hookers, and the rest keeping the guy in power. How can you respect the fia after that?
      They have to regain his status by doing things the right way, and we haven’t seen anything yet.

    2. Crom says:

      It’s hilarious

  29. Bayan says:

    I can’t help agreeing with Ferrari here (although it does seem like they were a bit harsch). There should be a process setup to graduate teams into F1, not just allow somebody to buy any team that has defaulted from F1.

    FIA should also have a more strict process of reviewing potential buyers/new entrants and weed out any potential USF1′s. It seems like even though F1 has become more of a business, the powers that run F1 still treat it like a club in this regard. Some of the new teams seem to be in it because of making money and don’t care too much about the racing.

    Myself as an F1 fan, i hate to watch cars so slow that they are lapped 4, 5, 6… times in a race or drivers so inexperienced that they disrupt a normal race due to incidents.

    I hope Todt does some good.

    1. todt show us you are better than mosley says:

      and what about safety? nobody talks about it now.3 secs off the pace, cars falling apart on the track. This politicians like mosley are worthless individuals, that just talk, and do things, because they have to do something to justify their salaries.

  30. Pierre says:

    The way Ferrari says all this is arrogant and harsh, we can feel it’s still very passionated from Montezemolo’s point of view, that he’s still not accepted last year fight with Mosley, but I think Ferrari is not far from the truth.
    Do you plan to speak with Todt soon, James?

      1. Pierre says:

        Let us know asap!

        What I personnaly do not understand from the beginning with new teams regardless who they are, is how Mosley and some of them, considering the current economic turnover which started two years ago, the fact that companies massively cut marketing budgets and now look twice and deeply at what they spend and how, believed they would be able to get the money from sponsors to run a team, wether 30 millions budget cap or not. I’m involved into the marketing arena from the last 16 years, what I only seen is companies who delay, cut or cancel budgets, even huge companies and worldwide groups which are profitable! So this is non sens to me, and they must have been blind and be out of the reality to believe it.
        Virgin has the budget because it’s Virgin group. Same for Lotus (same for Torro Rosso and Red Bull!). But considering it’s now became hard even for established and/or potential winning teams to get sponsors (look at Sauber which on the paper has a car with good potential so should create interest, look at Renault even if they got poor results these last years and the team has only got Renault’s name, look at Brawn last year (small sponsorships (Canon for one race only in Singapoor for example) and clearly said he sold the team to preserve its future)), how could an independant new team, starting from zero, could convince companies to give millions? Millions for what return? Having its name 3 seconds slower than the rest of the field for one year, and the promise of a possible fight with established teams in three years? I very hardly believe a reasonable manager would currently accept that.
        Thinking of a budget cap was and is a legitimate idea, forcing current big teams to reduce budget was and is a legitimate idea (not so easy to do), but pushing new actors in this economic climate is an other thing which was and is madness.

      2. Freespeech says:

        I disagree, it’s not the FIA’s business how the teams run THEIR business’s.
        The FIA should be nothing more than referees

      3. Pierre says:

        Freespeech, can’t reply to your post so reply to mine!
        I completely agree with you that teams have to run their business by themselves and FIA is and has to remain referees. But job of the referees is also to look at the playground and its environment, if it’s playable. I think it’s also part of their responsability.
        F1 playground is not only tracks, but also the money you need to play it, because it’s huge amount to run a team. So pushing for new teams with the current economic climate could not deliver something else than the current situation (new teams without money to play the game).

    1. napoleon says:

      arrogant is the word best describes todt.

    2. Pierre says:

      Freespeech, can’t reply to your post so reply to mine!
      I completely agree with you that teams have to run their business by themselves and FIA is and has to remain referees. But job of the referees is also to look at the playground and its environment, if it’s playable. I think it’s also part of their responsability.
      F1 playground is not only tracks, but also the money you need to play it, because it’s huge amounts to run a team. Pushing for new teams with the current economic climate (which may indicate FIA underestimated it) could not deliver something else than the current situation (new teams without money to play the game).

  31. Meeklo says:

    LucaDiMontezemolo’s vendetta is almost as bad as Mosley’s.

    1. Zobra Wambleska says:

      When the dogs are after you, you’d better be prepared to fight.

    2. balestre ,mosley ,bush, chaney... says:

      i don’t agree. remember he wanted the classic tracks back, and the fota was looking for ways to improve racing, making the survey to see the fan’s opinions.
      He is not a politician, but the fia forced him to act, because they were hurting the sport.
      He is not perfect, and has his own agenda, but he is much better than mosley.

    3. F1ART says:

      Exactly, Max lost the plot and now Luca, massive ego’s and totally out of touch with the real world.
      Bet Bernie (white knight) isn’t too happy about this outburst, but he did use them all as pawns to keep control and so it’s now come back to bite him in the ass!!!
      Hope you’ve got some awkward questions for Max James?

  32. Howard Hughes says:

    Whatever you think of its fairness or otherwise vis a vis the new teams, it’s a bravura piece of writing….quite sublime really – both artfully and forensically expressed with a degree of skill far surpassing anything one would expect from Private Eye or similar…

    I quite like that political correctness is being cast aside for once. We should have more of this!

    1. machista says:

      Latin character for you, sarcastic but with an aftertaste of truth, and pointless, but what the hell

    2. Crom says:

      I agree, it raises the stakes and heightens the drama and tension ahead of the season opener – I think it’s great. We need more expression of passion in F1.

      It’s the very opposite of the repetitively dull corporate comments we’ve become accustomed to.

    3. " for sure " says:

      ……….a bravura piece of writing? Really? Clearly I need to get out more and expand my literary horizons. Anyone got an old copy of the Sun hanging around?

  33. Jonathan says:

    I really can’t understand why Ferrari would publish such remarks. Surely it would be better to just keep schtum? There must be so much deep bitterness for this rhetoric to come out of the Prancing Horse.

    I found it rather embarrassing to read to be honest.

  34. Bec says:

    Sour grapes from Montezemolo’s yes men. If it wasn’t for Montezemolo and Briatore the new teams that signed up for the budget cap would be a lot less likely to be in the position they find themselves in now, and the teams that left citing the global recession, Toyota, BMW and most of Renault would still be in F1.

    Max was right, Luca and his close pal Briatore were very wrong.

    1. machista says:

      sour grapes? Max delivered what FOTA (Montezemolo) predicted last year, lousy teams with no racing pedigree and no funds. Sounds like sweet revenge to me.

  35. Lopek says:

    I think Ferrari are right on the money with their statements.

    The start of the season is going to be completely dominated by talk of new teams being mobile chicanes, teams not being there at all, and the potential return of the cheats with Stefan.

    We should all be talking about a great battle at the front, a British superteam, Alonso at Ferrari, the return of Schumi, etc.

    If Mosley’s plan was to weaken the power of the big teams I guess he has achieved his goal – although he has also weakened F1 as a whole, and the FIA. So status quo, with added mobile chicanes.

  36. Andy says:

    Condescending, pompous and arrogant. Same as their similar comments a few weeks (months?) ago. I support free-speech, so I’m glad that they feel able to make these comments in the post-Mosley era, but they devalue the Ferrari brand in making those comments.

    F1 is the pinnacle of motorsport competition. As such it should be open to anybody (though I accept that the entry list has to be limied due to the pits facilities, etc). Allowing “minnows” to enter strengthens F1, it doesn’t weaken it. If those minnows struggle, it serves as a demonstration of the high standard of the other “established” competitors. If the minnows achieve increasing success then it keeps F1 fresh and ensures that we see the best (the very best) competing in F1.

    On this particualr issue, Max got it right. Whether the selection process produced the right choice of teams is another matter.

    Frankly, I shan’t mourn the loss of the manufacturers. I want to see teams with spirit and personality. I don’t associate those adjectives(?) with manufacturer teams.

    Oi, Ferrari, fight your battles on-track, not on your cheap little web site!

    1. Tim Lamkin says:

      …hum….”the post-Mosley era, but they devalue the Ferrari brand in making those comments”…so MM did not devalue F1 and only Ferrari did by speaking the truth….

    2. machista says:

      The pinnacle of motorsport open to anybody? seriously? Can I have an entry in 2011? and some pitbabes too?

    3. Peter Brito says:

      I agree that formula 1 did get a little too corporate and its interesting to see new teams with grit in the championship…
      But the season hasn’t even started; we dont know how much slower these teams are going to be, and if they’re too slow? It reflects badly on F1 as the pinnacle of Motorsport.

      F1 should belong to the fans; the screening process should be made transparent; and we need to see the FIA, FOM and FOTA work together to bring it to the fans.
      So much potential this sport, and I am an avid fan – but they need to stop shooting themselves in the foot!

  37. AJH says:

    I love F1.I love Ferrari. This is a result of trying to cut costs, you cut the costs and it seems like football you will get anybody running the show taking it into places and dark corners -what happens when they dont get the return they expected? – F1 is about innovation and in motor racing the only way this will happen is with money and experience, the sport should be pushing the envelope – making cars that are greener, using KERS etc. You need the might of the big car company’s to help this along, dont get me wrong I don’t agree with the budgets of 200 million but Carlos tevez cost City 47m. New teams ? Forcs India does alright with help from McLaren and Mercedes without all the photocopying that Mike Coughlan did.

  38. Richard Bell says:

    I’ve never been a Ferrari fan, but as an Alonso fan I was attempting to warm to them until now, when again I’m reminded why I dislike them so much.
    They continue to belittle Lotus and VirginF1 as if they’re not worthy of joining F1. The 2 teams have put themselves together in a matter of months so they’re hardly going to be front runners just yet. Anyway, is it really bad they’re replacing a manufacturer like Toyota, who spent $4 billion to achieve 3 fastest laps and 3 pole positions?
    I’m sorry, this may sound harsh to some, but when Ferrari slate the smaller teams who’re raising their own funds to compete, while Ferrari themselves took £100 million off Max/Bernie (not to mention getting the rights to veto new rules) are a complete disgrace to the sport.

    1. Denis says:

      Not to mention the continuing backing by a tobacco company…

      1. machista says:

        JPS? West? Mild seven? British American Tobacco, owners of BAR? Marlboro?

      2. M. Fitri says:

        Yeah.. Somehow, Agreed with that…

  39. Jeremiah says:

    Lou must have gotten up in the morning feeling bad after having too much macaroni and wine for dinner.
    Every time this happens he issues a proclamation on the website

    1. machista says:

      still healthier than a takeaway curry chips and bitter though, clearer mind come next morning

  40. Stu says:

    I’m sorry but I can’t stand for this sort of thing – at what point is it acceptable for a professional racing team to make these sort of comments on a public website. It is one thing for us to do it, as we (I mean the readership) do not have a hand in the sport at the shopfloor level, but I do not feel it is the place of a established team to be making a statement of this sort.

    I would like to suggest what does Ferrari have against the new teams? Surely they can’t be scared/worried about them as they have rightly pointed out they are off the pace. F1 needed new blood after major manufacturers decided the sport was too expensive for them during the times of recession. Would Ferrari prefer to be running around a track with say 16 cars?

    Also having teams off the pace in F1 is not exactly something new, the sport was full of them in the late 80s and early 90s – most of them far less professionally run (altho USf1 seem to be rivaling them on this) – and as I seem to remember Ferrari weren’t exactly doing too well themselves at that time.

    Anyway, never liked the team…

    1. Greig says:

      I think it might have something to do with Ferrari wanting to boost the grid by pushing for the (then) current teams to be allowed to run a third car…

    2. machista says:

      There is the pride of competing against good professional teams,sometimes winning sometimes loosing. Remove Ferrari, redbull, mercedes, Bring in TomGP, DickGP and HarryGP. Would McLaren be as proud of their victories?

      1. Stu says:

        While I do agree with what your saying, I feel that Ferrari are going about making their point in totally the wrong way. Smacks of a childhood, playground mentality.

        And as I say, there have been plenty of periods in F1 when there weren’t many manufacturer backed/owned teams and I don’t think the professionalism of F1 suffered as a result. Everyone has to start to somewhere – Williams weren’t exactly a big team when they started but look what they became in the mid 80s and early to mid 90s.

    3. Alex says:

      Well, they didn’t seem to mind running around a track with only 6 cars, including 2 of their own.

  41. jack tors says:

    While I agree with the implications..which arent implied at all, this does nothing more than perpetuate the child like behavior of Montezemolo and Mosley over the FOTA/FIA squabble. This shows Ferrari in a suprisingly Mclarenesque arrogance. Do all things F1 revolve around Ferrari? sadly…yes.

    1. machista says:

      No things don’t revolve around Ferrari, but when silly decisions are made disregarding due procedure they are not PC, they say what tey think, openly and loudly. A lot of sarcasm but you got the point accross, didn’t you?

  42. Jameson says:

    I wonder if these venomous rants show up every three and half weeks or so…

    Ferrari need to keep their mouths shut and let their car and drivers do the talking at Bahrain. It seems as though they have a great car this year, so I don’t know why they feel the need to belittle the new guys.

    1. machista says:

      Not a rant at the new guys man. It’s a dig at MM and erratic FIA policies, they aim for the head (todd) not the legs. They state how they see the sport as of today and point at FIA as the guilty party.

  43. Martin P says:

    It’s one strong individual within Ferrari, just as Mosley was in the FIA. But your analysis of not caring about manufacturers but definitely caring about the standards in F1 are bob on as far as I’m concerned.

    More interestingly though… why is Max holding court?…. I’m sure he’ll have very clear views on the new entrants etc., but surely it can’t help Todt (or the new F1 Commissioner) for Max to be saying anything to anyone anymore.

  44. Michael says:

    Ferrari says Mosley’s tactics drove the manufacturers out of F1. You can just as easily say that their departures show that Max was right, that F1′s dependence on the manufacturers was foolish because they do not really care about racing, just about selling cars. When F1 is not doing that in a way taht justifies the expenses, they get out. Which they did. So maybe the new teams are filled with racers (as Ferrari is) who care about the sport, not about pleasing shareholders. And maybe that should be encouraged, not made fun of.

    1. machista says:

      good point though.
      it will take the new tems a few years to become competitive. What if in the meantime redbull renault and williams decide to fold? McLaren racing Ferrari and a bunch of slow privateers? F1 needs stable regulations, stable teams and car manufacturers in the game or all is lost…

  45. artowar says:

    Sen-bloody-sational. I love it.

  46. Gareth says:

    But the manufactures have gone!!!!! and if no new teams came in then we wouldbe down to 5 teams. Ferrari havealways wanted 3 car teams, but then do we really want 3 mclarens,3 ferraris and 3 red bulls.
    At the same time i agree with Ferrari about USF1 and Campos. These teams are a disorganised mess, with Campos i estimate 12-14 seconds slower than everybody else in Bahrain and USF1 looks beyond a joke.
    To refer toLotus and Virgin being at snails pace, i think is insulting. Fair doos they are going o be slow, but brand new chassis and at least they are testing. What would really be humilating for Ferrari, what if one of these teams bet them in Bahrain?

  47. Dave P says:

    I am not surprised by these comments… in fact I wondered what had happened… why they had gone silent…

    On balance I agree with them AND their sentiment for the following reasons:

    1. This is F1 the pinnacle – you might say the premier league of motor racing. There are plenty of lower leagues that if you want to dabble in this you should ‘cut your teeth’ in, understand what is needed, build an infrastructure around AND THEN progress into F1. Jumping in as a new team with no experience as a complete team degrades F1
    2. When other manufacturers have joined in the past, rather than just ‘jump in’ they have professionally taken a year of preparation, testing etc.. and still found it difficult.. take Toyota and BMW as an example.
    3. How is any new team going to be able to do a satisfactory job when they need to be working on next years car in May – they can’t even get their current car working properly by then

    Ferrari is only saying what the other teams are thinking… and a lot of fans.

    I think that at the very least, these new teams should have taken a year of testing first, then if after that they are still standing – and haven’t shut shop or sold out, then they could enter the next year. Doing it the way it has been done is bad for all concerned.. especially the new teams

  48. Patrick Caselli says:

    Actual translation from Italian;

    We lost Michael!! Wah, wah, waaaahhhhh!!!!

  49. John Glynn says:

    Long as people keep giving that clown column inches, Mosley will leave the building. I vote for a universal pact never to mention him again. And Bernie supporting a team that hires Coughlan is beyond the pale. So much fore regime change! Ultimately, all this is an unneeded downer just before the start of a really great season in prospect.

  50. John Glynn says:

    Long as people keep giving that clown column inches, Mosley will never leave the building. I vote for a universal pact never to mention him again. And Bernie supporting a team that hires Coughlan is beyond the pale. So much for regime change! All of this is an unneeded downer just before the start of a really great season in prospect.

  51. Martin Smith says:

    I don’t quite know whether to applaud the fact that someone in modern F1 has thrown away their PR-speak dictionary for a day, or to be shocked that this diatribe has come from Ferrari, one of the most mealy-mouthed corporate entities in sport for the last dozen or more years!

  52. Steve says:

    It’s not what one expects in F1 but it’s great fun to read. I do agree that the due diligence was not very thorough – thanks for that Max. It’s going to be a very interesting year.

    Oh, and James, thank you very much for your insights. Great blog.

  53. Martin Smith says:

    It’s just occurred to me that Ferrari’s dismissive comments about the new teams are entirely in keeping with the sainted Enzo’s famously contemptuous description of the British privateer teams of the 1950s and 1960s as “garagisti”…

  54. Peter Jones says:

    It was a bit harsh from Ferrari and puzzling given that they’re received so much preferential treatment over the years from the Bernie & the FIA, but I think Luca di Montezemolo is still upset at the loss of power regarding FOTA. Bernie and the FIA now have the upper hand and he’s none too happy.

  55. Ginger says:

    Is this the great team that asked Luca Bad to drive their car? Is this the great team that gave up half way though the season and only kept some dignity due to the brilliance of Kimi?

    Is this the team that asked the race leader to pull over to let thru MSC?

    I could go on.

    New F1 teams take time to evolve and Ferrari need them as there would be nobody to beat!

    As for MM he spoke about the budget cap long before the manufacturers pulled out. If you view that interview now, it was on the BBC site, he made a lot of sense and what he predicted came true. A modern day Nostradamus!

    It’s a shame that cars are going to be lapped early in the race but they will improve with time.

  56. Alexx says:

    I think that the FOTA manufactures wanted more rights from the FIA and a bigger slice of the TV money from Bernie!

    M&B thought no-way, and pushed out the manufacturers buy creating rule instability.

    The uncertainty of the future at that time during the economic climate scared them off, while the whole time luring new teams of a promise of a cheap and lean F1. Teams of little commitment and history promised a helping hand of engines and even a possible rule benefit!

    A pipe dream! F1 has and always will be a super expensive sport, because cutting edge technology in any form is expensive! Military, Aero & Space, IT Industries are examples of the costs of technologies.

    My belief is that by limiting the budgets, technologies and research of future ideas can be denied or slowed down!

    Its was the commercial/political ‘Max and Bernie Show’ at full steam!, just that Toyota,BMW,USF1 and others paid for it!

  57. Roger says:

    I am fed up to the teeth of reading about Ferrari, Alonso and all the other baggage that seems to surround the team. They operate on an open cheque-book business model and this is reflected in their arrogant stance to the rest of the field. I really hope it all comes back and bites them in the bum, when the greatly feted Alonso is unable to even keep up with Massa, let alone the McLarens and Red Bulls who will probably be away well in front. I even hope Schumacher partakes in a few “no frills” escapades when overtaking the red cars.

  58. Paige says:

    As an American, I’ve got a big problem with Ferrari’s tone in this passage.

    “The thirteenth team, US F1, appears to have gone into hiding in Charlotte, North Carolina, to the dismay of those like the Argentinian, Lopez, who thought he had found his way into the Formula 1 paddock, (albeit with help from chairwoman Kirchner, according to the rumours) and now has to start all over again.

    Amazingly, they still have the impudence to claim that everything is hunky-dory under the starry stripy sky.”

    It’s one thing to criticize the FIA’s actions involving the new teams, or to take pot shots at a new team. It’s another to put down a country- not to mention its best customer in terms of car sales.

    I’m not at all a fan of Ferrari, but comments like these make me want to really hate them.

    1. Jonny Kiehlmann says:

      I don’t think they’re actively criticising the US there – just USF1.

    2. AlexD says:

      You are overreacting, mate. Ferrari does not say anything about the country, but the team USF1 and I would say more – USF1 is bring a lot more shame to your country by doing what they are doing – showing that the team that represents a country can’t even build a car and have dignity to pay employees.

  59. Midnight Toper says:

    I’ve just been onto the Stefan GP website. There’s a nice high res photo of Coughlan (grinning) and co. along with a rather untidy desk featuring CV’s (with mugshots), technical drawings and computer screens.

    Seems like a very open policy for a prospective F1 company, or are old habits just hard to break?

  60. Pierre says:

    If Campos and USF1 do not make it, will it have any impact on Cosworth? Does anyone know?

  61. Nick Stewart says:

    Ferrari may well be firmly embedded in F1′s heritage and boast of a passionate and fanatical following the world over but——–
    This vitriol has no place in F1 and is to my mind as devious and damaging to the sport as any spy scandal or staged accident. F1 will always be better when the big manufacturers are not pulling the strings. It was Ferrari amongst others who have spent their way to success and subsequently turned it from a sport to a business. To put down the brave efforts of the new entrants is petulant and unsportsmanlike in the extreme. Lotus has a great sporting heritage too, I feel so angry for them! All power to the new boys, do the talking on the track, be patient and lets hope Ferrari end up with egg on face.

  62. ranavalona says:

    James, I do hope that your meeting tomorrow is not going to turn out to be Mosley’s announcement of his appointment as the new F1 Commissioner!!

  63. jose arellano says:

    very harsh on virgin and lotus, but exactly nailed on campos and usf1

    how hard to the fia could be to ask for a bank account with some money in it BEFORE giving a entry

  64. John O'Neill says:

    I have total respect for Ferrari for saying what they think – it is refreshing in these times when press releases have gone as far as to use phrases like “our nearest rival” instead of naming a team.

    However, I don’t think Virgin and Lotus should be criticised so harshly. They’ve at least built a car and team from scratch, which is probably going to get them to within at least four seconds of the leaders. Established teams have struggled with that some years.

    And it creates excitement because they’ll make mistakes, they’ll have mechanical failures, they’ll get in the way whilst being lapped – all those things that used to happen before F1 became so professional that you’d have a whole race without a single retirement. Then one day they might get that freak result, that everyone applauds.

    But teams missing the first four races, who still haven’t even built a car? If that’s allowed it seems a huge step backward for F1.

  65. kevin says:

    I think Ferrari are just bitter that they wern’t allowed to run 3 cars and lost the schu to mercedes.

  66. Pablo says:

    The comments put out by Ferrari do nothing but make themselves look bad. I can’t help but wonder what the desired outcome of an article like this would hope to achieve. The language itself is both embarrassing and and offensive to the traditional spirit of the sport. In my humble opinion, you could expect this from an individual from any team in the heat of the moment…but this is coming from the organization itself at their own pace….shame on them. Instead of letting it out on the track, they’ve decided to sling mud from the comfort of their computer desks.
    “Holy War”, “vultures”, c’mon…it sounds like a tabloid wrote this, not a top class racing team.

    While concept of voicing their opinion on the status of F1 today is warranted, the manner in which they did it is purely unprofessional.

  67. StefMeister says:

    There is elements of the Ferrari comments that are correct, however why do they feel the need to continue to repeat the same tired crap?

    Ferrari layed into the new teams hours after they were announced, They laid into them at a time when they all looked in a stronger position than they do now & they are laying into the new teams that have already produced a car & got some testing, something that in my opinion deserves some credit considering the lack of time Lotus in particular have had.

    Luca Di Montezemolo has been against the new teams since before they were selected because he wanted teams to run 3rd cars & I think that since that idea was refused he’s just been ranting about that, the new teams & the FIA at every opportunity. I’d say he also blames the FIA on them losing Schumacher because he more than likely would have been in any 3rd car Ferrari ran.

  68. PaulL says:

    I’m happy that Ferrari spoke out. I, as an F1 fan of 15 years, am disappointed about the lowering of standards and the manner it was forced upon the teams.

    James, I (for one) also agree with Ferrari about the loss of BMW, Toyota, and most of Renault.

  69. Peckers96 says:

    Unless this is some form of signalling that Ferrari are using to garner some behind-the-scenes support or positioning, I don’t think these comments will endear Ferrari, or Luca, to many fans.

    Max Mosley is many things, but he is not stupid. I wonder whether he ever truly believed that four new teams would make the grid in Bahrain or, as in a negotiation, he asked for four teams knowing that he’d be happy with two?

  70. DK says:

    While I see the facts from this fiery attack on MM and the new teams, I think they have gone too far and too harsh on some of the more serious new teams.

    I guess LDM still feel very sore about loosing MS to Merc. If the selection of new teams would have been tighter, he may have succeeded in getting the 3rd car on the grid and retain MS to race.

    I also think Ferrari is talking big now because the test results has somewhat indicated they are in front. I just wish there will some occasions this season the red cars are overtaken by the “limping” ones.

  71. SHIPARCH says:

    Very funny and very true, could not agree more with Ferrari. Although I think in the long run Virgin and specially Lotus get better as they gain experience, Campos and USF1 will end up not running this year or just dropping out in 2011. An entry should have been given to ProDrive/Aston Martin.

  72. Darren says:

    I agree the limping comment is very distressful. Ferrari remind me of a punch drunk boxers giving it large once last time believing they are the best. Well Ferrari watch out for the knockout blow from Mike “THE BULL DOG” Gascoyne.

    If you don’t like the sand pit you can take your toys elsewhere

  73. Trent says:

    The entry of the new teams does not appear to have been handled fairly or honestly.

    But Ferrari are taking it too far to suggest that teams like Lotus and Virgin are making a mockery of the sport. In 1992, Ferrari themselves were at times 3-4 seconds off the pace in qualifying. It’s only in recent years that the field has been so evenly matched.

    10 teams is not enough, and I think Ferrari might find that most F1 fans favour the expanded grid. It’s not easy to start a new team, so let’s give these guys a chance to get a foothold.

  74. ARVI says:

    “leave the rules for 5 years (even if they are poor) and let teams and privateers have a 5 year programme”
    STOP CHANGING THE ****ING RULES EVERY ****ING SEASON. That way, cars can evolve, rather than having to be redesigned every bloody year. And if a team is running low on funds, it can use last year’s car and improve it over the course of the season.
    THAT’S how to reduce costs in F1.

  75. Ridwan says:

    I just wanna LOL for this:

    … munificent white knight, well used to this sort of last minute rescue deal.

    and for this too:

    … from that very same knight in shining armour …..

    I love this kinda propaganda. Very good work Ferrari !

  76. Tony says:

    Limping teams, we would do well to remember that even Renault had a torrid entry to f1 with cars belching flames when they stopped and it didn’t take long for them to come good. Most of the great names in f1 had the advantage of running cars in Grand Prix racing built by someone else which is not available to the new teams, even Ferrari as Enzo ran Alfa’s pre-War.

  77. Mighty Quin says:

    Harsh but fair!

    Also harsh on Stefan GP and ProDrive that Campos and USF1 are dying a slow lingering death rather than pulling out now while there would still be time for another team to take their place – as surely once the season starts they can’t just allow a new team to join in.

    Hang on … this is the FIA … what am I thinking … of course it could happen!

  78. Rich C says:

    I’m surprised at Ferrarri’s constantly running their mouth during this ‘off season’. I thought they had more class than that.
    Obviously not.

  79. KerbRider says:

    Best thing ive ever seen come out of Ferrari!

  80. Peter Brito says:

    I can understand Ferrari’s frustrations; even though as a fan I dont agree with them.
    Having this kind of press brings down the value of F1; especially as it remains one of the most expensive platforms for advertising available in the world today.
    Ferrari want to know that if theyr’re spending this amount of money on F1 that, they get a return on their investment. At the moment; the spiral of bad press in recent years isn’t helping things at all.

  81. Nitin says:

    harsh yes, but very well done…I love their English :). LOL is what I can say. Honestly by the looks of the whole thing I doubt if Virgin nor any of the new guys would race the whole year except for Lotus (As its backed by Malaysian govt), I don’t see anyone there who has the money to sustain for more than 2 yrs. Just my 2 cents, lets wait & watch for the season to end.

  82. FandangoF1 says:

    It seems to me that Ferrari are becoming the Grumpy old grandad of F1. Yes I personally am unhappy with the USF1 and Campos situation but the way that Ferrari are going about making their opinions known shows a lack of respect to the F1 fans of the world. We are big enough and ugly enough to make our own minds up about what is happening with F1 teams, by speaking out the way they are it looks like they are getting bitter, twisted and a bit too long in the tooth. Surely the biggest and best answer Ferrari should give is performance on the track.

    Ferrari, Actions speak so much more louder than words! Get back to the actions and shut up with the words.

    All the best

    FandangoF1

    1. AlexD says:

      Do not worry about Ferrari’s performance. There are not so many teams that are showing such determination, love for the sport. You like F1 because of two reasons: either you love Ferrari or you love a team that loves to beat Ferrari.

      1. FandangoF1 says:

        The thing is, I used to adore Ferrari. However, since these “outbursts” I have grown to dislike them possibly even detesting their arrogance. I’m now championing the underdogs untill Ferrari just get on with it and stop running their mouths.

        It makes me wonder what Enzo would think, i’ve loved F1 for many a year and don’t remember him belittling new entrants the way the current top brass at Ferrari do. He had more grace, style and substence than the current head honcho’s.

        All the best

        FandangoF1

  83. Fausto Cunha says:

    It´s the ferrari style!

  84. Matt says:

    Funny.

    Personally I think Bernie and Max had no choice but to bring the new teams in, with Honda going and I’m sure it known much earlier than we found out that Toyota, BMW and essentially Renault where all on the way out too it would have been a PR and marketing nightmare showing up to the first race with only half the field, or which only two where manufacuters.

    Force India, Toro Rosso and Sauber are all only their by good grace too and particuarly Force India and Sauber could go very quickly I think.

    So there is no doubt new teams had to be be brought in, Ferrari can’t argue with that I don’t think.

    But, it’s the choice of enteries that blows me away. Get a US team in, fine straight commercial reality that you want to tap that market but how could it have turned out so poorly?

    Virgin is just marketing without I doubt the soul RBR brings.

    And where is ProDrive?

    1. Matt says:

      I can’t wait to read the ‘horse whisperer’ the day after one of the pay drivers from whatever comes out of USF1 and Campos takes a Ferrari or Mclren off the track as they lap it for the 5th time in 40 laps.

  85. Peter says:

    I don`t like the language Ferrari used but they are mainly right. I still do not understand how coud F1 go in a direction that is opposit to the mainstream automotive trends? Carrying 100 kg extra fuel whereas its all about weight savings in the real world, getting rid of KERS afte huge investments, freezing engine development instead of encouraging developments for less fuel consumption etc etc. Now we have continually changing teams and owners sometimes with money who knows from what sources instead of well established global automotive brands.

  86. Interesting lexicon used – any clues as to who the author is? Seems more Stephen Fry meets Ian Hislop ;-)

    I don’t particularly care for Ferrari normally, but I agree with the sentiments expressed here. Well said by them – whoever the scribe is!

  87. Sam says:

    Hmm I have a mixed feeling about this. Ferrari does have a point. We should be watching BMW Toyota with strong financial backing, not getting lap instead of those teams doing a GP2 in f1.

    But, there is a strong display of capitalism in it.

    They hired the best driver, they paid another champion to stay off the track, they tried to keep 7 times world champion off the track by making him busy with road car development etc..

    And NOW they almost sound like bullying to the F1 business start ups.

  88. Joe Biggs says:

    I cant believe I’m saying this but for once I agree with Ferrari :O

    The field has been so competitive the last two years and I can remember when I use to watch teams well off the pace and a few seconds a drift of the front runners.

    Unfortunately we are going to see this all over again and to make it worse the Lotus brand destroyed.

    Such a shame and the one team that should be in Formula 1….Prodrive just having to sit and watch :(

  89. Olivier says:

    aah … I am enjoying this level of transparancy :) So much better than the “for sure” corporate talk.

    It is a little harsh on Lotus & Virgin though. Ferrari should not forget that they produced a dog of a car last year. Despite having unlimited resources and years of expertise in F1. And doesn’t the saying go that one should never awaken Mike, the sleeping bulldog? ;)

    However, they are spot on the Serbian vultures, Campos and USF1. The image of Bernie as the little knight in shining armour is just hilarious :D thank you Ferrari!

  90. rpaco says:

    Well I reckon it’s both very funny and excellent gamesmanship. Though it does remind me of a hilarious an old black and white film “School for Scoundrels” where one is taught how to win by fair or foul means, Ian Carmichael, Alistair Sim et al.

    They have attacked Mosley directly and given a casual off-handed side swipe at the new teams.
    Great stuff, let’s see some retaliation. Bernie will be rubbing his hands a the free publicity!

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