Hot fun in Summertime
Budapest 2014
Hungarian Grand Prix
Briatore: “Mosley is reaping what he sowed”
News
Briatore: “Mosley is reaping what he sowed”
Posted By: James Allen  |  06 Jan 2010   |  6:44 pm GMT  |  78 comments

Flavio Briatore has been hitting the airwaves in a limited way over the last 24 hours, after his victory over the FIA in the Tribunale de Grande Instance in Paris, which overturned the lifetime ban imposed by the FIA World Motor Sport Council last September.

Picture 67
He spoke about his feelings on former FIA president Max Mosley’s role in his ban and he said point blank that he was not involved in the crash fixing scandal which rocked the sport last season.

In a telephone interview on Italian TV station RAI, he spoke more openly about Max Mosley than he has so far elsewhere,

“Will I come back to F1? At the moment I’m only interested in Formula Bambino (his first child, a boy, is due in three months),” he said.

“I’m much more tranquil now, the harm that the decision of the FIA did to me was great, the harm Mosley did very great indeed.”

Briatore added that he has no “thoughts of a vendetta” against Mosley, but said, “Now Mosley is reaping what he sowed. The decision (of the Paris court) has given me back my freedom and my dignity, things which Mosley took away from me in a vile way. Let’s enjoy this moment.”

He also appeared this morning on BBC Radio 4′s Today programme, where he was pressed to own up whether he was involved in the Singapore crash plot or not,

“I am not involved at all, if you take the FIA investigation. That’s all I’m allowed to say at this moment, ” he said, on two occasions.

“I have no desire to get back into Formula 1, I’m happy to have my dignity back. The last six months have been a very difficult period for me.”

The FIA still has the opportunity to appeal the court’s decision and is weighing up its options.

Featured News
MORE FROM JA ON F1...
Share This:
Posted by:
Category:
78 Comments
  1. Ishaak says:

    He may not be “Enjoying the moment” as much if the FIA are successful if they appeal.

    Anyway…what happens to Piquet? I can’t understand how the persom that committed the offence and having been proven guilty, can get away with it? Anyone make out the logic behind this?

    1. Flintelli says:

      I’m certainly mistified by it all. Piquet should have come out of this worse than anyone! It doesn’t help that Mclaren (though rightly guilty) were given a 100 million fine for having a 780 page ferrari document and emailed each other about it!

      Piquet put others lives at risk!

      1. Ishaak says:

        EXACTLY! So he should, rightly, be punished. Im sure you all agree!

    2. Michael Grievson says:

      I think Max offered immunity because he saw an opportunity to get Flav. Piquet wouldn’t have been so keen to dish out information if he knew he’d be punished.

      Its all politics :)

      1. Freespeech says:

        You mean Mosleyics :)

      2. Ishaak says:

        Yeah i understand that…but to quote Kubica, “Normally if you go to the police and you say you killed someone but you know someone else who killed three people, you will still go to jail.” The judgement not to impose any sanctions to Piquet doesn’t make sense.

    3. Freespeech says:

      He’s hardly got away with it scott free has he :?: If he had he’d have picked up a drive for 2010 as he has both money and more than a little talent (well more than a few on the grid at least).

      1. Ishaak says:

        I don’t agree with that. He had more experience of the car and yet Kobayashi, with very little experience proved his worth in two races and deservedly earned himself a drive!

    4. Jonathan Dye says:

      Piquet can get away with it because Mosley was only interested in taking down Flavio. Piquet was just a pawn in all of this. He should have been banned from motor sport for life but Mosley had his sights set on Flavio so everyone else was let off and all the blame but on Britatore’s shoulders.
      There seems to be no continuity in FIA rulings under Mosley.
      Mclaren cheat = $100million fine
      Renault cheat = 2 year suspended sentence (Flavio banned for life)
      Im not a Briatore fan but he has been singled out and targeted unfairly by Mosley, although Im not saying he is 100% innocent in all of this.

      1. Martin says:

        The size of the McLaren fine was justified in terms of making it hurt financially. It was also influenced by McLaren initially stating it had conducted a thorough investigation, and was then shown not to have done so. With Renault-Singapore, it was a first offence.

    5. Matt says:

      its like Telonso getting away with the Mclaren rubbish.

  2. Henry Manney says:

    F1, the FIA and all the “ugly business” aside, it would certainly appear that Briatore has a personal life which is immeasurably happier than the life of Max Mosley.

    And at the end of the day, if your life isn’t happy, whatever
    else you might have done in the world doesn’t mean much.
    At least that’s my take after having lived since the days of
    Graham Hill’s racing career.

    1. Stephen Kellett JAF1 says:

      You are so right.

      If you don’t have your health, its very hard to be happy, even if you have fantastic relationships surrounding you.

      And if you aren’t happy then you need to do something about it (and the solution is not money – just pointing it out to those not old enough to have worked that out yet).

      Health comes first, everything else is secondary.

      Good health to you all.

  3. paxdog57 says:

    “Flavio and Max”, the pot calling the kettle black. It is time for F1 to turn the page on both. The action should be on the track not the courts.

  4. rpaco says:

    Flav not letting the facts get in the way of self promotion.
    Does he honestly think anyone believes he was not involved? He is carrying on as if he has been exonerated, which he definitely was not.

    The FIA still have to appeal and even if they loose he is still banned, as he will never be given an F1 licence

    He is apparently also considering suing the Piquets.

    1. Stephen Kellett JAF1 says:

      Yeah, the Today programme interview was horrible. I didn’t time it (not my style, besides I was in bed), but it felt like they gave him an extended interview – I guess it must have been a “slow news” day.

      I was quite surprised at just how badly he speaks, he seems to mumble everything he says. His grasp of English isn’t too good either (*) which also surprised me.

      Or put it another way, don’t bother going to the BBC website to “listen again” to the interview. You didn’t miss anything.

      * My grasp of Italian is pretty much down at the 1% level, but then again I’m not an international jet setter parading on a global stage.

    2. Matt says:

      haha. Well all know Flav believes his own dillusion of grandure. this is no different. in his mind he did nothing and wasnt there!

      What i find amusing about Flav is he is taking NO responsibility for the actions of people under him!
      When there was a crash at Clapham Junction bosses went to jail because they were at the top and they knew what was going on and did nothing. Being at the top comes responsibility (pi Pl insurances), you cant be at the top but have the responsility of a cleaner. get it Flav??

  5. ZR Leigh says:

    While i do not condone cheating in any way. I do think that a lifetime ban was too strong and that Max Mosley wanted to settle a score with Briatore.

    I’m pleased that the ban has been lifted but get the feeling that Briatore is no longer welcome in F1 as teams (and sponsors) don’t want to be associated with him.

  6. fernando says:

    FIA won’t appeal – that’s my guess. why? If they took actions on people whom they couldn’t to what can they do now? Just nothing (except licenses to all “big” people in teams). Even if they change penalty it would still be illeagal. But now it’s up to Jean Todt. By now it seams that Max Mosley is gone – hello Max Mosley

    1. Freespeech says:

      The FIA could simply change their rules if that’s what they wanted.
      Fairness and what’s right doesn’t come into it for them

  7. Med says:

    “Will I come back to F1? At the moment I’m only interested in Formula Bambino (his first child”

    Thank God there was more to that sentence, for a moment there I thought he’d given his kid one of them “celebrity” names.

    Didn’t he have a child with Heidi Klum though?

    1. KNF says:

      Yeah, he did, although I think the singer Seal is listed as the official father of Heidi Klum’s child…

      1. Steve says:

        Correct. Klum was pregnant by Briatore before she even meet Seal.

  8. Gilraen says:

    Well, mr. Briatore should wait a little longer before blowing his bassoon.
    The court has dismissed the FIA process and procedure in their ruling against him, but the FIA is not done yet and neither has the court ruling exonerated Mr. Briatore and/or Symonds.
    IF he’s involved in having Nelson jr. to crash, he should be out of F1. If not, how unlikely that may seem, he should be able to hold any job in F1 he likes.

    Unfortunately, F1 is on the boards, blogs, news again for the very wrong reasons.

    For anyone who was still in doubt about the sanity of reasons Kimi had to leave F1? Just read this weeks headlines.

  9. Brian says:

    “Will I come back to F1? At the moment I’m only interested in Formula Bambino (his first child, a boy, is due in three months),” he said.

    Didn’t he knock up Heidi Klum a couple of years back? You know, just before he fired Button ’cause Button was “too much of a playboy”?

    1. James Allen says:

      No, that was the singer, Seal

  10. Mouse_Nightshirt says:

    “Mosley is reaping what he sowed”? What exactly does Flav mean? Mosley isn’t reaping anything. He’s retired and enjoying a cup of tea no doubt. Mosley no longer has anything to answer for; the only one who is suffering from all this is Flav.

    But let’s not let any semblance of truth ruin Flav’s parade!

    1. Brace says:

      You remind me of F1 people.

  11. Robert says:

    They won’t get any teams to agree to the licencing system, teams didn’t agree to have a budget capping system where the FIA wanted to see their fiscal records to administer it. I doubt that private companies are going to want to put in a position where an international sporting federation governs who they can and cannot employ. How would they enforce it properly anyway? Will they have licences for particular titles and positions? Will even people like the transporter drivers need a licence? And what if briatore was employed as a consultant? Would someone in that position need a licence? And what if he was titleless and just an employee.. More speedy, lack of thought press releases by the fia it will never work.

  12. Matthew Dawson says:

    He has a son now? I feel sorry for Bambino…

    1. Barry says:

      Yes let’s pity the poor child for growing up with multi-millionaire parents who will give him the best of everything!

      None of this stuff has anything to do with Flav’s abilit to parent a child. Think of all the dodgy situatons he’s got outof etc, invaluable advice to pass on.

    2. Freespeech says:

      That’s not nice, surprised your comment was published, we should never bring people children into things like this :(

  13. Tom - Australia says:

    I really wish these vile people would just be condemed to the F1 history books and we could all move on to happier times.

    F1 should not be about rich (usually fat) old men.

    1. Matt says:

      Bernie is quite Slim i’ll have you know.

  14. manatcna says:

    At the end of the day, the FIA have shot themselves in their collective feet.

    1. Freespeech says:

      No. Mosley shot them in the foot.

  15. hugo says:

    James,is there any real chance that any team will hire him for 2010?

    1. Freespeech says:

      He may well buy his own team

    2. Andrew Hill says:

      That’s the key point.

      Regardless of the courts decision it would be very unlikely for a team to hire either Flavio or Nelson Jnr.

      Can you imagine Nelson getting coorporate sponsorship?

      Anyway, fans would probably lynch him before he ever set foot in the paddock again.

  16. Gary Smith says:

    Whether the lifetime ban is overturned or not is largely irrelevant to my mind. Surely if they FIA don’t want Mr. Briatore involved in F1, or any other motorsport, they’ll simply change the rules in such a way to exclude him e.g. the issuing of licenses to high-level personnel.

    Anyway, am I the only one who thinks Briatore is being a little premature with his celebrations? Afterall, the court only ruled that his lifetime ban was illegal, it’s not as if he’s been completely exonerated of any wrong doing and all his talk about considering legal action against the Piquet’s and drivers he previously managed is surely nonsense. Perhaps this case was Briatore testing the water with the legal system in preparation for a full on assault on the FIA to prove his innocence in a court of law?

  17. russ parkin says:

    he has won the battle he wanted actually. he has damaged max mosely and in a real court proved max used a fia court to settle a personal vendetta. and now max is not in the fia he cannot do anything about it. im sure the ruling will allow him to sue max next. flav will never run or be part of a team but do you think he cares ultra rich at 60?

  18. Ronster Rash says:

    This French court decision may be the dawning of a new age of reason in FIA-F1 relations – and I pre-date this to Jean Todt’s appointment as FIA President. (Assuming he was influential behind the scenes in things like the long term Silverstone deal and other matters attributed to him recently.)

    This and the end of Max Mosley’s rule and control of the FIA decisionmaking process including his maniacal manipulation mandated by silence and fear of recrimination by FIA Senators; wielding his big stick in pursuit of personal vendetta’s against people like Ron Dennis and Flavio Briatore who have dared to stand up to him and question his proclamations, policy direction and excessive penalties imposed.

    I hope so anyway, I hope Max’s sphere of influence has shrunk considerably despite the fact that he maintains a backroom position within the FIA. I hope Jean Todt will be his own man, continue his “arms-length” fair and reasonable approach to F1 while quelling fiery conflict as it arises rather than fanning the flames or even lighting the touchpaper himself…

    Let it be so.

  19. PaulL says:

    I’d be interested in your opinion James on all this.

    It seems that almost every follower of F1 feels that Briatore is only working the legal system to his advantage throughout all this, and that his false denial over crashgate only serves to preserve his corporate interests.
    I like Briatore as a personality but I cannot accept him claiming justice in this instance. I believe Piquet devised the idea for the crash, but I believe Briatore knew and gave him the green light and in the interests of justice he should be thrown out and that be an official decree of guilt. This sentence only serves to complicate things for F1′s image – because as James says, now no retribution (to either Piquet, Renault, Briatore, or Symonds) has been handed out. Needs resolution.

  20. Tom Gower says:

    He is doing exactly what I would do if I were him, saying he has no interest in returning. He will now hope the FIA will drop any thought of an appeal leaving Flav free to re-enter F1 in the next few months.

  21. Spyros says:

    Is anyone else wondering what FIA’s stance would have been these days if Ari Vatanen was running things?

    Just a thought…

  22. Stu says:

    This just highlights the need for a fair hearing to be carried out in the first place. Despite what Flav did the FIA witch hunt was anything but fair.

    Maybe the FIA need to introduce a “fit and proper person test” like the premier league have. Although that doesn’t always work it’s better than nothing.

  23. MartinWR says:

    Here we go again. All the silly nonsense about a Mosley vendetta is coming out of the woodwork as usual. Fact is the FIA and Max Mosley fell over backwards time and again to give the pair in question the benefit of the doubt over cheating allegations. Finally when Renault staged one of the worst acts of cheating in the history of pro sport and the FIA finally had evidence they could act on, they dealt with the matter in the only way available to them. Some vendetta.

  24. Steve says:

    The fact is that Flavio outright claims that the FIA investigation found that he was not involved.

    This is both untrue and is designed to try and get people onto Max Mosley’s back!

    ““I am not involved at all, if you take the FIA investigation. That’s all I’m allowed to say at this moment, ” he said, on two occasions.”

    Personally, I would like to see Flavio hauled up in front of a Singapore court, whether brought by a civil action by the FIA, or alternatively a criminal investigation into race fixing and attempted manslaughter (I know this is slightly exaggerating it, but just suppose someone had been injured/killed by ordering a driver to crash deliberately!!)

  25. bg f1 fan says:

    Who is the good side here??

    -Piquets escaped punishment, but were involved all the way. Nobody feels sorry for them as they told(snitched) the secret only after Piquet Jnr was sacked for his trully unsatisfying performance. Now no team would hire a bad pilot and a revengeful father.

    -Flavio was the man behind the whole thing. He gave the “go” to everyone contrary to what he says. Surely no one will back him up in his fall.

    -Max on his side, resembled more an angry german soldier of the first parts of the 20th century, than a impartial judge serving the interests of the sport.(especially in the latest terms of his FIA presidency). Nobody seems to feel bad about him leaving, even more so in the presence of the much more friendly and balanced Jean Todd.

    Successful New Year to everyone and hopefully the next season we see more racing and less politics.

    1. John F says:

      This would have been a good and thoughtful comment – until you decided to use the “german” attribute in your argumentation. What’s your point? Why not compare him to an angry British soldier (not that this makes any more sense)?

  26. Howard F says:

    Yet again the FIA has shot itself in the foot – both of them actually. Flavio escaped his ban on a technicality, even the court failed to make a statement exhonorating him from the actual offence. He may well be wise to enjoy his time at home – the sport would be far better off without him. That said the original punishment had more to do with ‘Sad Mad Max’ getting his own back on a person he saw as a rebel voice in F1 rather than punishing a team for cheating. I notice Pat Symonds has maintaned a dignified silence in all this….. a superb engineer, maybe he’ll be back. With all the new teams, think he will James??

    1. James Allen says:

      Not sure about Pat. He did, after all, fully admit guilt, so it would be brave for a team to hire him. But he is such a valuable asset to a team technically.

      1. John F says:

        The problem for Pat is that the longer he stays away from F1, the less his value as technical asset becomes.

      2. Howard F says:

        I would tend to agree, but with the stabilised rules for the next few years and lack of development on engines and gearboxes, both his engineering and managerial expertise will be invaluable to the new teams

  27. lip_iceman says:

    So over this. All he wanted was his football activities to go on unhindered. None of the three involved directly in crashgate will be back in F1.

    I mean, the driver: who options nascar truck over F1?

  28. Barry says:

    I love how Flav takes all the blame for crashgate when the main culprit has immunity. If someone told you to jump off a cliff would you do it? The only thing that is ridiculous in all of this is the fact that Piquet wasn’t the one who got the life ban. Afterall he was the one at the wheel, he was the one who supposedly crashed on purpose, he was the one who endangered marshals and fans and all the rest of it.

    Flavio might have told him to do it (was it ever really proved beyond doubt?) but that doesn’t make him responsible for it. Piquet is not a child, he makes his own decisions and the fact is he chose to crash when he could have said no. The reasons why he did it are irrelevant, he crashed on purpose to fix the result of a race.

    Piquet is the cheat, he shouldn’t be allowed to race in any FIA sanctioned event ever again.

    1. Matt says:

      Mate, have you ever work for a demanding BOSS? who has told you to do something you know wrong but it will better the company?? (whether it is break the speed limit carry more stuff – lie to a client etc)
      i am assume NO!
      To blame someone who a whistle blower is hilariously niave on your part.
      Piquet is 24. a kid. Flav in his 60 and old man who is the TOP of the COMPANY. the one who signs the cheques and the one who has total responsibility for the company – like Pi and Pl and Proff insurance etc!!!

      Your train of thought leads me to believe you wouldnt want criminal imformants because they have done something wrong – even though they can give you far greater evidence against some one far more corrupt!

      Sorry your living in some perfect utopia which is not real life.

      Alonso should also be done for the Mclaren thing and this!!!

      1. Barry says:

        Just because you are turning in someone else does not absolve you from your own actions. Your reasoning suggests you are in favour of the “blame someone else for your own actions” defence, you mention criminal informants but most of them are minor criminals. Piquet on the other hand did something that was deemed bad enough to give another person a lifetime ban.

        With your train of thought as you put it, a person could commit any crime and blame in on pressure from someone else, as long as you come forward first and say the other guy made you do it nothing will happen to you? Now that is hilarious.

  29. RON says:

    The FIA, under Max Mosely, had the credibility of the Mafia…

    F1 has become increasingly ill over the years – very few people believe ther results and WDCs are at all geniune…

    The who sport become a controlled form of advertising in the last few years… with no geniune racing.

    It was hardly surprising that more then 97% of the people wanted a breakaway series from the FIA…

    A full investigation in to the failures of the FIA should be launched ASAP…

    I believe Briatore over Max by a factor of a millon…

  30. krad says:

    I do feel this victory is a mute point. After all it didnt clear his name it just said the punishment was outside the FIA’s remit.

    Now the FIA will just put in a requirement for the respective people to hold a license. To obtain them you will need to pass test x,y, and z.

    Do you think they will come up criteria FLAV will be able to pass??

    End result the same.

  31. Kedar says:

    Hi James,
    The autosport website claims that Briatorie may be back to manage drivers except Kovaleinen and Di Grassi. Does this mean he will manage Alonso? I remember he was his manager prior to Alonso moving to Mclaren. Who is Alonso’s current manager?

      1. Matt says:

        is not Bruno? or does Bruno do Webber etc??

  32. Freespeech says:

    This whole mess is Max Mosley’s doing, than heavens he’s no longer involved with F1 (or does he have a hot line to his puppet) :?:

    1. Martin Collyer says:

      No doubt you will soon see JA’s next post discussing this very point!!

  33. alex m says:

    Thanks for including the photo of Flav with Mrs B, very subtle James, for some reason it reminds me of Mrs Merton and the rather splendid Paul and Debbie Daniels interview.

    “Now Mrs Briatore, what was it that first attracted you to the Multi Millionaire Mr Briatore ?”

  34. Mike from Medellin, Colombia says:

    I am disgusted by Flavio deduction that procedural failings by the FIA are to be interpreted as he being innocent of cheating.

    There must be an immense amount of anger amongst fans…much in the same way that there is anger amongst the public when an obvious criminal is not found guilty due to technicalities.

    I hope that no sponsor would be willing to touch Flavio with a stick from now on.

    Come one Max….come out of retirement and finish the job on this unsavoury character!!

    1. Dale says:

      The law is the law, without it it’d be a worse place for us all.
      Max Molsey thought as the FIA President he could make his own law, he was wrong he can’t as the French court has deemed.
      Mosley should be brought to the FIA and charged with bringing the FIA into disrepute.

  35. JF says:

    The FIA needs to just get on with business, let this go, and stop the mudslinging. I would just make licenses mandatory for all race team staff as is apparently being discussed and then not issue one to Briatore. Besides, who would hire him now anyway.

    1. Ted the Mechanic says:

      Yea but what criteria or terms of reference would they apply to the investigation into a person’s character to determine whether they issue a licence or not?

      Would it be merely a subjective decision based on whoever the FIA nominates for the task? or would they be pulling police records, credit checks, company directorships, etc, etc?

      Has the potential for the FIA to get a reputation for fascist practices with Big Brother overtones.

      A sensitive subject in some quarters…

  36. Would love to know who the witness ‘X’ is and what role he/she played in all this

    1. Martin says:

      The internet amateur analysts favour Alan Permane, particularly as Bob Bell was made the acting boss following Briatore’s departure.

    2. Dale says:

      Could it have been ‘Alonso’?

  37. carlm21 says:

    keep sweaty arm pits banned.

  38. manatcna says:

    We’ll probably never know who witness X was/is, and after all, does it really matter?

  39. FAster says:

    Yea it’s exactly the same isn’t it.. [mod]

  40. FAster says:

    No it’s not Bruno hence why he said Luis Garcia you peanut

  41. Bill says:

    if the courts overturned Flav/Pat’s “convictions” as not valid, couldn’t they nullify Piquet’s immunity too? If one part of the case was null, why not the other?

LEAVE A COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Top Tags
SEARCH News
JA ON F1 In association with...
Download the chequered flag podcast today
Download the chequered flag podcast today
MTS
Industry-Leading Testing and Sensing Solutions
Multi award winning Formula One photographer
Multi award winning Formula One photographer